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War in the Gulf, 1990-91: The Iraq-Kuwait Conflict and its Implications Hardcover – September 27, 1997

4 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

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Hardcover, September 27, 1997
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Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

The swift onset of the Persian Gulf War took many observers (and many television viewers) by surprise. It had, historians Khadduri and Ghareeb note, been a long time coming, however. Kuwait had been artificially severed from Iraq at the end of British colonial rule in 1921, and Iraq had long been seeking access to Kuwaiti ports on the Gulf that, had it been granted, might have forestalled war. Carefully tracing the history of the 1990-91 conflict, the authors suggest that Saddam Hussein's invasion of Kuwait followed a certain logic, but not an inevitable one, and that the Allied powers perhaps should have waited for a peaceful Iraqi withdrawal. Theirs is a controversial reading of history, but one that merits an audience. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

The swift onset of the Persian Gulf War took many observers (and many television viewers) by surprise. It had, historians Khadduri and Ghareeb note, been a long time coming, however. Kuwait had been artificially severed from Iraq at the end of British colonial rule in 1921, and Iraq had long been seeking access to Kuwaiti ports on the Gulf that, had it been granted, might have forestalled war. Carefully tracing the history of the 1990-91 conflict, the authors suggest that Saddam Hussein's invasion of Kuwait followed a certain logic, but not an inevitable one, and that the Allied powers perhaps should have waited for a peaceful Iraqi withdrawal. Theirs is a controversial reading of history, but one that merits an audience. --Amazon.Com Review
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 299 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford Univ. Press (September 27, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0788164244
  • ISBN-13: 978-0788164248
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.1 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #9,729,413 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Format: Paperback
The book paints a full picture of the historical dispute between Iraq and Kuwait, which basically started in 1899 when the Kuwaiti royal family made secret deals with the British. It carefully goes over the personalities involved and how they tried to shape the situation. The reading can get slow at times if the reader is unaccustomed to the various spellings of Arabic names and locations, i.e. Husayn = Hussein, Makkah = Mecca. However, the information provided gives a clear insight to the logic of the Iraqi invasion of 1990 and subsequent Operation Desert Storm in 1991. Whether or not one agrees with the conclusions of the authors, it definitely is a wealth of information on the subject. This is a must read for all interested in Mid East politics.
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