Trade in your item
Get a $3.82
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

War in the Age of Intelligent Machines Paperback – December 26, 1991

ISBN-13: 978-0942299755 ISBN-10: 0942299752 Edition: 2nd Ptg.

7 New from $26.00 22 Used from $25.86
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$26.00 $25.86

Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student



NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Save up to 90% on Textbooks
Rent textbooks, buy textbooks, or get up to 80% back when you sell us your books. Shop Now

Product Details

  • Paperback: 280 pages
  • Publisher: Zone; 2nd Ptg. edition (December 26, 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0942299752
  • ISBN-13: 978-0942299755
  • Product Dimensions: 0.7 x 6 x 8.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #211,402 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By William Michael Brown on June 18, 1998
Format: Paperback
De Landa strikes me as a popularizer, but what he lacks in theoretical rigor he more than makes up for with discipline, serious intent, and sheer vision. Best antidote in print to the kind of mostly ignorant, ahistorical cyberphilia that dominates too much of "Wired" and other ongoing public discussions of our technological future. If you like this, you must not miss "A Thousand Years of Nonlinear History", which advances his methods and insight to a much wider, even more significant level.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Lee D. Carlson HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on June 14, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Picture the following scenario: two countries, call them A and B have declared war on each other for reasons of their own (usually of course without moral justification). A begins the conflict by sending over to B's territory hundreds of thousands of entities that look like houseflies. Equipped with wings and tiny sensing devices, these entities swarm all over Country B and perform surveillance by communicating with each other and with A's central command. This is followed by a massive cyber attack on B, wherein its computing facilities and networks are flooded with intelligent network agents that work their way through B's networks and stymie their ability to route useful information. Once B's networks have been effectively made useless, A sends over thousands of ground-based and air-based robots, all of which are carrying ordinance and can identify enemy targets and destroy them as they see fit. These machines are able to communicate with other and coordinate attack plans, and they use both explosive power and cognitive disrupters to mentally confuse B's military infrastructure. At no time in this conflict was there any human in country A involved, except perhaps as a spectator. In fact, even the strategies and attack plans, as well as the decision to go to war against B in the first place, were the responsibility of intelligent machines. Country B, not having the same technological capabilities as A, is effectively decimated within a matter of days, if not hours.

This hypothetical and future-pointing scenario of the use of intelligent machines in warfare is one possible one that is not too far away from present capabilities.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 16, 1997
Format: Hardcover
This is an amazing piece of work that brings together many diverse fields of study into a remarkable, comprehensive view of humanity's technological and industrial development. highly reccommended for anyone interested in humanity's relationship to the things it makes, and everyone else. A little technical/academic at times, but overall a brilliant work
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Nathan S on February 8, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
How would a robot write a history of its own kind? This question kick starts De Landa's most famous book, detailing the history of the "war-machine" through the eyes of Deleuzian philosophy. I can't say I totally get Deleuze, but his project excites me in those rare moments I can parse it. De Landa does a great job of bringing Deleuze's philosophy into the real world and showing us how many of Deleuze's concepts can be made to do work in the disciplines of history and the social sciences. I can't really make any claims about how important this book is, or even how important De Landa and Deleuze are, but I love this book, it makes philosophy fun, kind of like watching a really great action movie, where ideas are the heroes. Happy to have it on my shelf.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?