Warburg in Rome and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $28.00
  • Save: $10.98 (39%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Warburg in Rome has been added to your Cart
Condition: Used: Good
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

Warburg in Rome Hardcover – July 1, 2014

68 customer reviews

See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$17.02
$9.44 $2.53

"Kitchens of the Great Midwest" by J. Ryan Stradal
Each chapter tells the story of a single dish and character, at once capturing the zeitgeist of the Midwest, the rise of foodie culture, and delving into the ways food creates community and a sense of identity. See more
$17.02 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 3 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Warburg in Rome + Christ Actually: The Son of God for the Secular Age
Price for both: $34.36

Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

*Starred Review* Carroll, winner of the National Book Award for An American Requiem (1996) and the PEN/Galbraith Award for House of War (2006), both nonfiction, has also written numerous novels in multiple genres. Here he combines fact and fiction in a historical thriller. Carroll makes clear in an author’s note that, while the “main characters and their story” are fictional, everything else in the book, centering on the treatment of Italian Jews during and after WWII, and including a Vatican plot called the “ratline,” which secretly relocated Nazi war criminals to Argentina, is based on fact. This author’s note, which appears at the end of the novel, might have been better placed at the beginning, since what Carroll describes is so horrifying (as in details on a children’s concentration camp) as to seem fictional. The man who encounters this tangle of evil is David Warburg, sent to Rome by the U.S. War Refugee Board at the end of WWII to help bring aid to the European Jews arriving in Rome. Warburg has two guides to the inferno of postwar Rome: a woman Red Cross worker and a young American priest. Their efforts are met, first with bureaucratic roadblocks, and later with full-out betrayal. Carroll’s depictions of the chaos in Rome, along with his insights into the Vatican ratline, are unforgettable. Recommend this utterly engaging thriller to fans of Joseph Kanon’s The Good German (2001) and James R. Benn’s Death’s Door (2012). --Connie Fletcher

Review

"Carroll, winner of the National Book Award for An American Requiem (1996) and the PEN/Galbraith Award for House of War (2006), both nonfiction, has also written numerous novels in multiple genres. Here he combines fact and fiction in a historical thriller. Carroll makes clear in an author’s note that, while the “main characters and their story” are fictional, everything else in the book, centering on the treatment of Italian Jews during and after WWII, and including a Vatican plot called the “ratline,” which secretly relocated Nazi war criminals to Argentina, is based on fact. This author’s note, which appears at the end of the novel, might have been better placed at the beginning, since what Carroll describes is so horrifying (as in details on a children’s concentration camp) as to seem fictional. The man who encounters this tangle of evil is David Warburg, sent to Rome by the U.S. War Refugee Board at the end of WWII to help bring aid to the European Jews arriving in Rome. Warburg has two guides to the inferno of postwar Rome: a woman Red Cross worker and a young American priest. Their efforts are met, first with bureaucratic roadblocks, and later with full-out betrayal. Carroll’s depictions of the chaos in Rome, along with his insights into the Vatican ratline, are unforgettable. Recommend this utterly engaging thriller to fans of Joseph Kanon’s The Good German (2001) and James R. Benn’s Death’s Door (2012)."--Booklist, STARRED review
"James Carroll has written a novel with the breathtaking pace of a thriller and the gravitas of a genuine moral center--as if John LeCarre and Graham Greene collaborated to produce Warburg in Rome"—Mary Gordon, author of Pearl and The Love of My Youth

"Carroll, who explored the history of Catholic anti-Semitism in the nonfiction account Constantine’s Sword, returns to this theme with a suspenseful historical drama set in Rome at the end of WWII and centering on Vatican complicity in the flight of Nazi fugitives to Argentina. David Warburg, a U.S. Treasury Department lawyer, is sent to the city to organize the War Refugee Board, a front for aiding Jewish refugees and helping to create their hoped-for homeland in Palestine. While in Rome, Warburg meets ruthless OSS counterintelligence head Col. Peter Mates, who is opposing Soviet domination of Central Europe through covert means. Warburg and Mates draw Father Kevin Deane, an American priest, and Marguerite d’Erasmo, a French-Italian Red Cross worker, into their plans, not realizing that both have hidden allegiances and motives. As Carroll cleverly weaves these characters among an assortment of liars, schemers, and charlatans, one character sums it all up: “None of us here is innocent.” While high-placed Catholic officials aid escaped war criminals, other factions seek revenge for wartime brutality, and still others begin the bloody struggle for a Jewish homeland in Palestine. And at the heart of all the treachery, murder, and tragedy is the Eternal City."--Publishers Weekly

"A well-paced thriller from longtime Vatican watcher Carroll (Crusade, 2004, etc.) set in post–World War II Rome, with the Catholic Church athwart a tangle of scandalous politics and incriminating deeds.
"Sanctuary, Sister, is for the guilty. We may not like it, but there it is." So remarks an American monsignor, Kevin Deane, who’s working to provide relief to Italian Jews, even as others in the Vatican are seeking to extend that sanctuary to their Nazi persecutors. Into this conflict comes refugee coordinator David Warburg, a confidant of Henry Morgenthau, who has warned him that "[o]nce Mark Clark captures it, Rome will be the nerve center and the escape hatch both." If Morgenthau only knew how deeply tunneled that escape hatch was….Helping Warburg—or is she?—is a Red Cross worker named Marguerite d’Erasmo, who "came of age as if she were a nun" but who has hidden resources, to say nothing of secrets. Marguerite is a person of faith much shaken, for this is a time in which "the Madonna seemed indifferent to everyone but her Son," while Warburg is a coolly efficient explorer of the surprising alleys his quest takes him down—not just the Vatican "ratline" that sweeps Nazis out of the path of the conquering Allies (Rome, as Warburg sees it, is "halfway between Vienna and Buenos Aires"), but also a complex storyline that finds highly placed elements within the Vatican opposing Jewish immigration to Palestine on the grounds that by doing so, they are helping to preserve the Holy Land, even as others are aligned with the revived cause of Zionism. Carroll blends a solid command of modern history with a sense for the varieties of evil that have inhabited it—not just the villains, but also the bureaucrats who have self-servingly helped them along and the apologists who have made the world safe for both classes of people.
Though without the white-knuckle tension of Graham Greene’s The Third Man, a yarn that’s of a piece with it—and a worthy successor."--Kirkus Reviews

"Warburg In Rome creates the atmosphere of a thriller with deeply serious historical undertones - the immediate aftermath of the German occupation of Rome. And the laying down of the infamous ratlines that allowed Nazi principals to escape allied capture with aid from the church. And Roosevelt's belated plan to save Jews still in Nazi territory. That's the history part. Fiction enters with a main character named David Warburg, a secular American Jew from northern New England. Roosevelt has charged him with directing the U.S. War Refugee Board and sends him on a mission to Rome, just after the Nazi retreat. Plenty of other strong characters gather around Warburg - some to help and some to disrupt. There's American priest, whom New York's ambitious Cardinal Spellman has assigned to advance his purposes, while in Rome and 24-year-old Marguerite D’Erasmo, a half-French, half-Italian beauty, whom Warburg finds both attractive and useful for his own plans. She's been working in tandem with a group of resisting priests and local Jewish leaders to save the lives of Jews still in fascist captivity. A long struggle ensues to find justice and love in the wake of the war. But the novel remains consistently entertaining, never didactic - even as a reader moves along, hip-deep in the history of the period."Alan Cheuse, All Things Considered

"Former priest Carroll (An American Requiem) returns with this complex and compelling novel of the Vatican and morality during World War II. The happenings here are dark indeed, and it’s often difficult to believe that the novel is based on real-life events. Lawyer David Warburg comes to Rome to help set up and direct the new U.S. War Refugee Board, an effort that aims to help European Jews rebuild their lives as the war comes to a close. In the course of his humanitarian work, he meets Marguerite d’Erasmo, a Red Cross worker who is motivated by much more than meets the eye. Soon David learns of the Vatican ratline, a system that the Church used to smuggle Nazi war criminals to safety in Argentina. No longer sure whom to trust, he turns to U.S. Intelligence, only to find that the ratline isn’t much of a secret after all. VERDICT This is a fresh look at a scandalous chapter of history, and one that reminds us that even when the war was over, the horrors were not. Sensitive readers should beware, as there are some graphic and extremely unsettling scenes. This book deserves a wide readership, and should especially appeal to readers interested in political and religious history."--Library Journal

"James Carroll’s 'Warburg in Rome' has many of the ingredients of a great spy thriller: a high-stakes battle between good and evil; a plot full of twists and turns; a cultural capital both seductive and corrupt; characters caught in ethical thickets; and a moment of existential crisis when all the world’s troubles seem to converge on a single point on the map, bringing out the best and the worst in all who happen to find themselves at the fractured center of civilization."--The Boston Globe

"A gripping political thriller set in a world of troubling moral complexity."--WBUR
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (July 1, 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0547738900
  • ISBN-13: 978-0547738901
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1.3 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (68 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #204,648 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

James Carroll was raised in Washington, D.C., and ordained to the Catholic priesthood in 1969. He served as a chaplain at Boston University from 1969 to 1974, then left the priesthood to become a writer. A distinguishedscholar-in-residence at Suffolk University, he is a columnist for the Boston Globe and a regular contributor to the Daily Beast.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Jill Meyer TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on May 30, 2014
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
During WW2, when did the idea of the Nazis as our enemy change to the notion that our real enemy was the Soviet Union? Was it after the Allied invasion at Normandy and subsequent push east was meeting the Soviet Army's push west through eastern Europe into Germany? Or was it even earlier? But, certainly, at some time, the allied governments were beginning to look past WW2 and at a showdown with the Soviet Union. And many of the defeated Nazi government officials, concentration camp personnel, the SS, etc, found common cause with some Allied officials as they were helped to escape capture and prosecution. These same war criminals often found solace and help in escaping justice by Vatican officials, who were helpful with the "ratlines" taking these men from Europe to South America. (And, of course, many were brought to the US to help with military weapons we thought we'd need against the Soviets, in that "next war"...)

James Carroll is a former Catholic priest turned historian and author. He has written both fiction and non-fiction, about the Church, Jewish history, the war in Vietnam, among other topics. He's an excellent writer. In his new book, "Warburg in Rome", James Carroll looks at Italy - and the Vatican, in particular - in the years 1943-1947. Allied forces have battled the Germans up the coast and now occupy Rome. The United States government is sending in aid organisations to help deal with the problems of refugees made homeless by war. As Italy has fallen to the Allies, reports - previously mostly sketchily told - of German atrocities against the Jews and others, are gaining credence as fact.

Into this end-of-war confusion step David Warburg, a Jewish lawyer working for the US Treasury Department, who is sent to Rome to coordinate post-war efforts to help refugees.
Read more ›
10 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
James Carroll admirably takes on a most difficult subject in this novel about postwar Rome: the Vatican's involvement with fleeing war criminals of the worst sort.

And he touches on an even more explosive issue: the complicity of Roman Catholic clergy in the Holocaust itself.

He brings to life a cast of fictional characters representing the many parties plotting and maneuvering in Rome - Americans civilian and military, British diplomats, Vatican Curia, Communist Partisans, escaping Nazis, Croatian fascists hiding out on Church property, the Haganah, fleeing Holocaust survivors, you name it.

A high-ranking U.S. relief official has come to Rome to help send one shipload (there will never be another) of Jewish refugees to the States, and to find pathways of escape for Jews in Budapest, whom the Nazis are now sending to Auschwitz in wholesale numbers. The book suggests how Swedish diplomat Raoul Wallenberg was enabled to save 30,000 Hungarian Jews: the U.S. blackmailed Sweden, which had allowed German troops passage across the country and supplied Hitler with arms and iron ore. This would be officially ignored if it played ball on Wallenberg.

Warburg must sort through the Vatican's confusing and conflicting record towards the Jews. It helped some while cozying up to their persecutors, but even its help is called into question once Warburg learns many were made to undergo baptism in order to find refuge. Accept the Cross or die, except that this is 1942, not 1542.

Meanwhile, Marguerite D'Erasmo, a young Italian Red Cross official, herself a fugitive from the Nazis, witnesses an atrocity that changes her life irretrievably. She is drawn more closely to Jocko Lionni, an Italian survivor who coordinated the hiding of hundreds of other Jews.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
25 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Scott Schiefelbein VINE VOICE on June 14, 2014
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
The years may tick by, but the Holocaust refuses to be ignored. If you read ancient histories, it's not uncommon to read about the Romans, the Persians, or some other victorious army putting an entire population to the sword. But the Holocaust is still in our living memory, and it was not merely the result of a conquering army. Sure, we have the necessary villains (the Nazis), but the Holocaust also needed the lack of opposition from others - perhaps the most shocking aspect of the Holocaust is how many turned a wilful blind eye to what the Nazis were doing.

And then we come to the Vatican's role in this horror show. This is a book review, so let's just say that the Vatican and Pope Pius XII (the Pope during WWII) have a lot of 'splainin' to do, and the consensus is that what the Vatican has offered as justification to date does not satisfy.

James Carroll dives headfirst into the murky world of Europe's treatment of the Jews during WWII with "Warburg in Rome." Carroll's hero, David Warburg, is sent to Rome after the U.S. Army captured it to lead the U.S. War Refugee Board. His charge is to aid the thousands upon thousands of displaced Jews fleeing to safety . . . and to stop the machinery of The Final Solution in its tracks. While one might expect this to be a simple good-versus-evil task, Warburg finds Rome a virtual Casablanca of intrigues, plots, schemes, and crimes.

There is a great book inside "Warburg in Rome," but unfortunately Carroll buries it in minutiae and adjectives. Quite simply, the man takes a long walk to make a short point.
Read more ›
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
Warburg in Rome
This item: Warburg in Rome
Price: $17.02
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com

Want to discover more products? Check out this page to see more: espionage