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86 of 87 people found the following review helpful
on July 27, 2008
I picked this up at a B&M store because I couldn't find the Cuisipro yogurt maker locally, and I didn't want to wait for shipping.

Overall, it's a great yogurt maker. Very easy to use, and it makes delicious yogurt. I really like that it comes with two different sizes of jars, so you can choose to make either individual servings or two larger amounts. Also, mine turns itself off when the cycle is done, although I can't find mention online or in the instruction book about an auto-off. The black and chrome matches my other kitchen appliances, so I don't have to hide it away with my other few white gadgets that don't match the rest of the kitchen.

The one issue I have with this yogurt maker: The base is large enough to hold 7 of the single-serve jars. The recipes in the book that comes with it makes enough for 7 jars. But it only comes with 6 jars. This is a little frustrating, as you end up wasting some of the milk mixture when you use it.

Replacement jars are available for order if you call Waring's customer service, and I plan on buying an extra set, anyway, so I can make the next batch before the first is used up. But I am really annoyed that they don't even give you enough jars in the first place. So now I will actually have to order 8 to make two sets of 7.

Otherwise....It's a great product.
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50 of 50 people found the following review helpful
on April 3, 2009
I got this because homemade yogurt is needed for the GAPS diet. It works. The kids like the yogurt. In fact, I was really shocked that they now eat yogurt with just frozen fruit in it--no other sweeteners. They like it that way, whereas they never did with store-bought yogurt. (Although I admit I still sneak a little maple syrup into my own... old habits die hard).

I've had perfect yogurt each time, right from the beginning. I've used both Yogourmet starter culture and a cup of previous yogurt. They both work. I sprinkle a packet of gelatin on the raw milk, heat the raw milk to about 170 degrees F, then cool it to 110 and add the culture and put it in the machine. I don't bother with sterilization. I use a big glass bowl instead of the plastic containers that came with the yogurt maker. Who needs plastic in their food, right? Then when the machine beeps that it's all done I whisk it briefly so a super-thick creamy layer doesn't form on the top--I like an even texture. And then refrigerate. Don't forget the refrigeration part. It is too runny right out of the machine and needs to set for a few hours.
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26 of 26 people found the following review helpful
on February 27, 2009
I got this yogurt maker to replace one I purchased over 30 years ago. I have found it to be very versatile (due to the two jar sizes), beautiful, and very well made. My old individual glass jars, plastic "freezer" jelly jars, and the ones that come with it, work great. I like the plastic ones for taking to work with me, as they are lighter. I use the large jars to make yogurt for yogurt cheese.

However, I did not agree with some of the instructions. I would not recommend plunging your hot saucepan into an ice water bath unless you want to risk warping it. Use another container. Also, I add flavoring just before eating, not while making it. I've used fresh fruit, honey, lemon, and fruit spreads, jams, and preserves.

I don't like the taste of powdered milk, so I use a can of evaporated milk instead (fat free, 2%, and whole milk varieties), then add fresh milk to make 32 oz. I use a 6 oz. container of plain fat-free yogurt as a starter. That will fill the 6 jars to about 1 inch below the rim, which is perfect, as it leaves room to add flavoring and stir without spilling.
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25 of 26 people found the following review helpful
on August 22, 2008
I was nervous about making yogurt, and this was a warm and friendly system for learning how to make yogurt.
I love the plastic jars. I have dropped them, and they don't break. They go right in the dishwasher.
I will make two batches in one day...one batch goes in the two large and one small, and then the second batch goes into the remaining small jars.
The main unit cleans easily with a soft cloth, and I'll rinse out the top. I was so happy with how well this worked that I bought one for my aunt for her birthday.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
on January 1, 2010
I got the Waring Pro YM350 for myself for Christmas (2009) to use along with my Salton YM9 one quart maker but I'm finding myself using just the Waring maker; it seems to make a better yogurt. I like my yogurt to be more on the firm side. I've been doing 8 cups at a time (of 2% low-fat milk ) using the two 2-cups & four 1-cup--they all fit in at the same time...don't worry that the cups aren't sitting in the little "cut-outs" on the surface of the maker...you can forget they're there if you want...just put the cups in this order in a circle: a 2-cupper, 1 cup, 1 cup, a 2-cupper, 1 cup, 1 cup.

(I've since added another 9-cup variation at the bottom of this review, in addition to another photo...as of Dec 2013 the photos show under the review section to the right under "Photos added by customers").

For 8 cups:
I cook 7-7.5 cups of milk in the microwave in a microwaveable bowl and check the temperature with a kitchen thermometer (Taylor Digital Thermometer w/probe that I got here on Amazon.com). Once the temp reaches approx. 185 degrees (approx. 18 minutes in the microwave on high) I let it cool on the counter (with a splatter screen placed on top of the bowl to keep dust etc. out yet let the milk cool more quickly). This is the same procedure I've been using with my Salton 1 quart yogurt maker for years, it just seems to come out better in the Waring.

When the temp gets down to between 106 - 110 degrees, skim off the thin layer of cooled milk at the top and add 6 ounces of non-fat dry milk and 6 ounces of plain yogurt starter (from the previous batch or store-bought with active cultures) and stir in until a uniform consistency (put the starter yogurt into a separate bowl first and add about a 1/2 cup of the warmed milk and stir in with a whisk...then add that to the main batch of milk and stir in). I put the two bigger cups & 4 smaller cups into the maker (don't put the lids on); place the maker's cover on and set for 10 hours. I usually set up the batch in the evening so it's ready to put in the fridge in the morning before I go to work. It's nice and cold when I get home.

I don't understand why a previous reviewer was complaining about the cups not being glass. I've been making yogurt for over 20 years and don't see any benefit to glass jars over plastic (BPA free). That being said, you can certainly replace the plastic jars with small glass jars, such as the Ball® brand canning jars. They're 8 ounces each and fit well. But any combination of glass jars you can fit will work fine.

I also don't understand why a different reviewer was complaining that the maker is "...just a warmer"...uhhh...yeeeahhh...it does keep the cooked milk warm at a steady temperature, but THAT'S how you get yogurt. However, there are instructions in the included booklet to make yogurt without cooking the milk first. You use room temperature pasturized milk and warm in the yogurt maker for about 16 to 24 hours, depending on what type of milk you're using. This method takes twice as long as it would when you pre-cook the yogurt in the microwave or on the stove.

Overall, this is a terrific yogurt maker!

(Update June 2010):
As I mentioned above, this is my latest configuration (I added a new photo)
this machine can make 9 cups using:
one of the 2 cup containers in the center,
the 6 included one cup containers AND
an ordinary 1 cup glass canning jar (a jelly or jam jar works or a 1 cup glass).

(Update December 2013): I am still using the first Waring YM350 I bought here on Amazon.com in 2009.
I make one batch each week and sometimes use a yogurt strainer to make Greek yogurt (sold here on Amazon.com).
I have since bought a back-up Waring YM350 so I now have extra jars (I just happened to find a refurbished unit elsewhere that was a really low price so I grabbed it).

Simple instructions based on the included recipe but adjusted for the increased size of 9 cups:
To make 9 cups using the configuration above with the 2 cup container in the center/7 individual cups containers around the center container):

Cook 8-8.5 cups milk in a glass or ceramic bowl (preferably one w/ a spout to pour more easily like a Pyrex 8 cup container) in the microwave for 18-20 minutes full power to 185 degrees (time varies depending on your microwave). Remove from microwave & cool to 106-110 degrees (Cooling CAN be done in the fridge too!). After cooled, Stir in 1 cup dry milk. In a separate bowl add up to 1 cup plain yogurt (from the previous batch) and stir in 1 cup of the cooked milk that has been cooled & the dry milk was added. Stir that mix into the main batch of milk for an even consistency (stirring with a whisk).

The jars are placed evenly as shown in the photo (2 cup container in the center w/ the remaining single cups placed around it)...they do NOT need to sit evenly inside the indentations on the bottom of the yogurt machine. Pour the batch of warmed milk into the jars. Do not put the lids on the jars while the yogurt is "cooking".

Place machine's clear cover on the machine. Set the timer for 10 hours (more hours or less depending on your preference...10 hours is more firm than 8 hours, for example). I prefer a more firm yogurt so I cook mine for 10-12 hours (I've even tried about 15-16 hours & the yogurt comes out great!). When the yogurt is done "cooking", place the lids on the jars & put in the fridge (by the way, if for some reason you accidentally miss the yogurt maker shutting off when the time is up...I can't tell you how many times I've done this...I just put the lids on and place the jars in the fridge as soon as possible and chill overnight... the yogurt has been perfectly fine).
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
on January 11, 2009
I bought one of this two months ago and I am fully satisfied. The plastic jars and the plastic cover are all made of policarbonate what is an expensive and high quality plastic.

The machine comes with 6 small jars and two bigger ones. Something I didn't have very clear when I bought, you cannot put all jars inside the machine at once.

This is good on the sense you can prepare more yogurt while still having some jar filled.

At principle you can fit 2 big jars + 2 small pots OR 6 small jars at once.

But I use to fit one big jar upside down + 6 small pots OR 2 big pots + 4 small pots (being 2 of them upside down). They may leak a little bit but it's easy to clean.

One hint to prepare the yogurt, if you purchase one pot to use as a seed, shake it very well before you open it and try to mix with the milk. That makes very easy to mix the milk with the yogurt.

Another think, a little weird is that the timer displays the remaining time in hours until it reaches less than an hour. Then it displays the minutes remaining and beeps at the end.

It is good advice to take the jars out when finished because the machine holds the heat for a couple of hours and the yogurt may get too acid.

Raw yogurt is useful to blend with milk and fruits, to make ice cream, as a milk cream substitute, to eat with fruits and cereals, to dry... Once you have it, there are many uses you can find out.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
on October 15, 2008
We just bought this yogurt maker and did the first batch European style (uncooked milk). It turned out just grand and tastes wonderful. I brought my favorite yogurt from home (Landliebe) and we added it to organic milk. Worked out great for us.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on January 28, 2010
Last month, I purchased this exact same yogurt maker at Tuesday Morning for only $29.00. After much research, I had originally planned on purchasing one of the the Euro Style yogurt makers. However, since the price was tempting and Waring Pro is well known for their quality, I purchased on impulse. I'm glad I did because this yogurt maker makes perfect yogurt, and you don't need to purchase the expense starter mixes either. Just use a good quality organic yogurt to use as the starter instead.

Amazon has great prices overall, but you still need to do your research as you may find unexpected deals when you least expect them!

Also, I watched a well known show recently that addressed the fact of the huge yogurt industry that has taken over the past several years. More so, the so called "bottle to go drink" yogurt versions. Doctors stated that these so called yogurts are worse than ever because so much of the goodness has been taken out and replaced with the bad. I will never purchase yogurts like this again. All you need is the fresh fruits of
the season, honey if you prefer for additional sweetness, and maybe a little homemade granola. Yummmmmmmmmie!

The only reason that I'm giving this 4 stars is because of the jar size issue that has been addressed in previous online reviews. Also, I would have preferred glass jars which I am currently shopping for.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
on June 15, 2009
I'm European and remember my mom & grandma making yogurt. When I relocated to the USA at age 29, I couldn't take everything with me and had to leave their yogurt machine behind. I bought this one as a replacement and couldn't be happier.

I made the first batch with fat free milk and EuroCuisine yogurt starter, and while it tasted delicious, it came out a little runny. I tried again with adding powdered milk (as suggested in many reviews and in the manual) and I felt like I hit the jackpot... It was so deliciously creamy and thick, I thought I died and went to heaven. I made the 3rd batch the same way and added the contents of 1 vanilla bean stalk to my lukewarm milk, and oh my.. that was yummy!!

The machine does fit 7 small jars, but only comes with 6... Don't spend an arm and a leg by purchasing more cups from waring Pro directly! I did some searching and finally found this jar:
[...]

It's made from glass (so much better and more "natural"), it fits like a glove and I can fit 7 at a time... price for 14 GLASS jars + shipping to [..] for 1 small jar, this website above charges [..]for a small jar. It's a no brainer.

Once you make your own yogurt, you will NEVER buy yogurt in the grocery store again. There's just no comparison!
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
on June 8, 2009
I researched several brands after my very old Salton finally died. I read customer reviews of the various models. I also wanted a unit that held 8 oz. jars rather than 6 oz. and decided on the Waring Pro. I am very satisfied with it. FYI....I find that following the exact directions concerning the temperature of the cooled milk to be key for a good result. To this end, I start the yogurt maker and place the jars inside while I prepare the milk. This avoids cooling the milk down too much as might happen if the 110 degree F. milk is poured into cold jars. I have had good results with this method. I have recently started using "Yogourmet Freeze-dried starter". The starter directions say to use 1 packet of starter per 32 oz. of milk and incubate for 4 to 4-1/2 hours. However, I use one packet for 48 oz. of milk (48 oz. fills the six 8 oz. jars for the Waring Pro) and incubate according to the directions for the Waring Pro. The results have been great. Prior to using Yogourmet starter I had good results using plain yogurt from Stonyfield as starter. I have not yet tried using some of the yogurt made with the Yogourmet Freeze-dried starter as the starter for the next batch, but plan to try it soon.
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