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Warlock In Spite of Himself Mass Market Paperback – March 1, 1982

Book 1 of 13 in the Warlock of Gramarye Series

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"An Unwelcome Quest"
Ever since Martin Banks and his fellow computer geeks discovered reality is just software, they've been happily jaunting back and forth through time. Who knew that rotten Todd would escape, then conjure a game packed with wolves, wastelands and other harrowing hazards--and trap his hapless former hack-mates inside it? Find out more author Scott Meyer
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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Ace (March 1, 1982)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0441873022
  • ISBN-13: 978-0441873029
  • Product Dimensions: 6.9 x 4.2 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (45 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,345,952 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Christopher Stasheff taught Communications at a small college in New Jersey for a number of years. About six years ago, he and his wife (and four children, who were the models for the Gallowglass kids) moved to Illinois, where he has been writing full-time.
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

The author writes a wonderful whimsical story.
L. Plummer
I had to purchase this book because I had worn out the copy I had.
Barry Turner
The blending of science fiction and fantasy is great.
A. Espinosa

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By E. Dunn on June 5, 2005
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I picked up this book in the early 80's and since then, has always held a special place in my heart. I really enjoyed Rod's self-depracating humor and the book's ability to blend fantasy and sci-fi into a cohesive whole.

In later novels in this series, I felt Rod was far too angry at times, since it was his rage that helped fuel his magic, but in the first novel, we don't really see that. What we do see is a warm tale, an author's deft touch, and a book that deserves to be in print for over 35 years.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Jason S Robinson on August 13, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
What a treat this book was. I picked it up in a used bookstore and can't wait to delve into the rest of Stasheff's books.

The hero Rod Gallowglass is one of the most enjoyable heroes I have read in a long time. His adventures on a world where elves and magic exist are one of a kind. When the book started I thought I misread the back of the book and was reading a science fiction story but the fantasy element soon came into play and they both combined to make a truly wonderful story.

I recommend this book highly.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Jayne G. Holt on June 22, 2004
Format: Paperback
This book made for a very fun few hours of reading despite a rather dated depiction of women (I had thought the book was written in the '80's when I first picked it up but a few chapters in, had to check the copyright date more carefully and was reassured to see it was written in '69). The fish out of water aspect-- a man from a technologically advanced society making his way in a medieval and magic filled world-- was handled with flair, the main charactor is likeable and funny and the world of Gramarye is nicely drawn. The story moves at a fairly fast clip that pulls you along.
As for the way women are depicted: the author seems to be in the same camp as Heinlein and other male '60's SF authors when it comes to female charactors who all seemed to be oversexed kittens in need of a firm male hand (and this includes the supposedly strong women!). There were only two main female charactors in the book and both are powerful- one a queen and the other the "most powerful witch in the world" (and the hero's romantic interest). And yet both are depicted as badly in need of a man in their lives. The queen is young- about 20- and she isn't a very good one- arrogant, willful, foolish and childish. The hero's solution? He recommends she be spanked by her suitor and at the end of the book arranges for her to marry a man whose wisdom she can defer to. The heroine, Gwendylon, is a more positive charactor who knows her own mind and persues the hero- apparently because she is sexually besotted with him. When the hero first meets her, he mistakes her for a peasant girl interested in a roll in the hay. He obliges and then leaves her, feeling guilty about using her and not wanting to give her false hope that there was any more to it than that: ". .
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By James on January 10, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
One of my favorite books by one of my favorite authors. This is the beginning of it all with Rod being assigned to the planet where esper talents actually create magical beings. His own talents combined with the technology he controls cause him to be named Warlock as he attempts to eliminate the influence of other outsiders who would subvert the government of this society. An incredible adventure with everything you could ask for in a science fantasy book.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 16, 1997
Format: Mass Market Paperback
"The Warlock In Spite of Himself" is one of the best books I've ever read. Combining elements of fantasy, science fiction, and historical fiction has never seemed so easy, or been so entertaining.

The book follows the adventures of Rod Gallowglass (nee D'Armand) and his struggle to free the planet of Gramarye (a lost world of colonists from Terra) from the clutches of a dictator.

What follows has some of the best elements of fantasy swashbuckling and futuristic hocus-pocus of any book in existence. What clinches the book for me, though, is the inclusion of my favorite Fantasy/SF topic: psychic powers!

That's right! Gramarye (whose society has reverted to a medieval setting) has it's own set of "witches" and "warlocks," each with psychic powers of varying degrees.

How Rod gains their trust and friendship, and eventualy enlists their help in his crusade to bring Democracy to the land, makes for a most interesting part of the story.

This is the first book of a rather lengthy series. I urge everyone to read it, but I offer this note of warning: if you read "The Warlock In Spite of Himself," you'll want to read *all* of the "Warlock" series... and you won't regret a second of it
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By P&B on May 28, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
Enjoyed until the end when I realized a couple of pages were missing Dug out my old hardcopy (Ace printing March 1982) page 341 to 344 a key passage is missing
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Shirley W on November 6, 2010
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I have read this once a year since it came out in 1969. Yes, it is that good. I am thrilled that I can add it to my electronic collection. If you are even thinking about purchasing it, I promise you won't be disappointed. The writing is fast, smooth and an enormous amount of fun. Underneath are so many little life lessons. YEA!! Rod Gallowglass we meet again!
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By frumiousb VINE VOICE on August 27, 2006
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Like many current readers of The Warlock In Spite of Himself, I had my first encounter with the series a long time ago. Stasheff and Rod Gallowglass were old early teenage favorites, discovered by me when the book was reprinted in 1982.

It makes for an interesting re-read. Fess is nearly as entertaining as a character as he was all those years ago. As a female reader, the female characters make me shudder-- worth remembering that the book was written in 1969. True to the time, a liberated woman was sexually liberated-- not any good at leading things. Stasheff's bone-headed Catharine is simply cringeworthy.

An urbane galactic traveller discovers a planet of lost colonists apparently stuck at a medieval period. His situation as explorer gets very interesting indeed when he discovers that this planet's witches can actually do magic...

I am no longer sure that I would recommend this book for a younger reader. Its biggest appeal is probably to folks like myself-- people looking for nostalgia of books that we read as teenagers. Still good for that purpose, and worth re-reading.
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