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October 3, 2011 | Format: MP3

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Song Title
Time
Prime  
30
4:24

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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: October 6, 1992
  • Release Date: October 6, 1992
  • Label: Warner Bros.
  • Copyright: 1992 R.E.M. / Athens Ltd
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Duration: 4:24 minutes
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B0017IZRX4
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #6,020 Paid in Songs (See Top 100 Paid in Songs)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

By hummingbird0272 on March 17, 2014
Verified Purchase
I love R. E. M. ! I bought this song on-line. I don't know what else I can say, but that I love R.E.M.
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By Rich on November 24, 2013
Verified Purchase
I saw REM at a major concert festival in DC right before this album dropped in 1992 and it forever changed the way I viewed REM as a band. The festival was like a three-ring circus, with multiple stages and musicians playing, vendors everywhere, and tens of thousands of people packed in. We all expected Stipe and company to deliver a fast rendition of Radio Free Europe or some similar song, so when they started to play no one was really paying attention. But within a minute it was clear something was different. The clatter quieted and all eyes turned to watch the gangly figure on the stage gently accompanied by his band.

Gone was the End of the World As We Know It-type diddies that typified REM's 80's pop-rock style. The band's new sound was not an abandonment of the old, but an evolution that showed a maturity and deeper artistry. It was undoubtedly a reflection of where the band had become much more involved in social issues and the introspection that invoked, which is equally evident in other singles from the album: Nightswimming, Everybody Hurts, and Man On The Moon.

Even today, the haunting reverb over the single guitar in the opening is enough to turn my eyes toward the radio. It's something different, something that commands attention. And it remains my favorite of the Automatic singles.
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By Sean P O'Brien on August 13, 2013
Verified Purchase
love this old r.e.m. song from back in the day. still a classic and a blast from my high school daze
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