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Warp-Speed Branding: The Impact of Technology on Marketing Hardcover

ISBN-13: 978-0471295556 ISBN-10: 0471295558 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Series: Adweek Magazine Series (Book 6)
  • Hardcover: 228 pages
  • Publisher: Wiley; 1 edition (July 12, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0471295558
  • ISBN-13: 978-0471295556
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.3 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,126,349 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Technology has changed everything. Product life cycles are shorter. Consumers are more informed, demanding, elusive. And brands can no longer afford to be crafted over lengthy periods of time. Instead, writes advertising guru Agnieszka Winkler, a brand can--and must--be built at warp speed. She continues:
With the advent of new communications technologies, it is now possible to spread the word, like a village drumbeat, to all corners of the world in months, weeks, or even days. The drumbeat is often carried by the users themselves--a more believable source of information in our jaded, skeptical society.
By profiling agile companies such as Apple, America Online, and Amazon.com, Winkler exposes the first myth of branding: "A brand is built over a long time." Another myth: "A brand is precisely crafted for a tightly defined target." Reality: "A brand is expansive." Myth: "Brand the product." Reality: "Brand a bigger idea." Myth: "The brand is a marketing concept." Reality: "The brand is a financial concept." But the most important industry trend may be the role of the Internet, which has become an integral link between producer and consumer. Winkler's "Just Do It" Internet approach isn't groundbreaking, but the online opportunities are made quite clear. The Internet also pops up in the 31-question "Warp-Speed Branding Quiz," which measures a company's readiness to tackle branding with warp speed. Marketers and advertisers who fail this test are well advised to get up to speed. --Rob McDonald

From the Inside Flap

Warp-Speed Branding "Time to market" is now the operative phrase for companies around the globe. Consumer and employee are simultaneously shaped by and shaping the new knowledge economy. We are no longer the linear, process-oriented rational world of the industrial revolution, and the traditional Procter & Gamble formulas for brand building are becoming increasingly obsolete. Warp-Speed Branding will challenge your current thinking and launch you into the new and creative ways today's hottest technology companies are tackling branding, leaving traditional ways of building brands far behind. These companies represent the meteoric rise of the technology culture and how it is moving through the worlds of marketing and advertising, transforming businesses in the blink of an eye and the click of a mouse. In this groundbreaking book, expert Agnieszka Winkler's compelling insight clearly shows how technology's presence in every business environment has already changed the role of the brand builder. Winkler's perspective reconsiders some of the standard marketing truths learned at the knee of consumer product giants like Procter & Gamble, Unilever, and Colgate-Palmolive. Now technology companies such as Microsoft, Intel, and AOL embody innovation and change and are rewriting the rules of brand creation. With Warp-Speed Branding, you'll see how to apply some of their lessons. The book exposes six myths of branding and replaces them with new truths in a "warp-speed world." Fascinating case studies detail the branding success stories behind Sony, Intel, Amazon.com, Dell, and others, out of which emerge principles, guidelines, and action steps. You'll learn:
* The new branding skills, attitudes, and processes companies need to make it in a warp-speed world
* How advertising agencies can adjust their processes and mindsets to help clients achieve faster time to market
* How to identify and manage your company's Brand Ecosystem(TM)
* How to take advantage of the extraordinary branding opportunities presented by the Internet
With passion and incisive thinking, Agnieszka Winkler gives you the new marketing lessons to be learned from today's technology leaders-and how to apply them to your own brand of success.

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Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

64 of 69 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 26, 1999
Format: Hardcover
The premise of this book is that brands can be developed in very short timeframes which is contrary to everything effective marketers know to be true. Only brand 'awareness' can be generated overnight; the 'identity' of the brand (that is, the brand's image and personality that set it apart from its competitors) is created and held in the consumer's mind only through time and experience. To set a proper foundation for sustainable brand identity, there is no viable substitute for long-term planning even among technology brands. High tech companies today compete on brand identity as much as they do on technological innovation; thus to treat the brand in such a fashion as Winkler suggests is detrimental to responsible brand management. Anyone can `build' a brand but Winkler's advice won't make a brand `relevant' to anyone but the manufacturer itself.
Winkler appears to be a closeted engineering-oriented client dressed up as an (alleged) advertising 'guru' as indicated by her thinking. Among those in the business who are known for brand advertising that truly engrosses the consumer rather than treats them as lemmings, Winkler's reputation is far from exemplary. What's more, her agency's creative product generally lacks insight and understanding, which is the first place one should look before assessing the strategic advice offered by an agency-based author. I suspect the agency does not employ any qualified account/brand planners as I imagine they'd be miserable.
I am a senior UK-based account planner on loan to a respected creative agency in California with several high profile technology clients. Whilst I agree that time to market is becoming increasingly short, I know from experience that Winkler's advice runs contrary to smart advertising development.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Buddy Del Rosario on April 9, 2000
Format: Hardcover
when i first bought the book, i thought i had got a real winner. there were ideas on brand building but limited to the companies which the author had direct contact. and they talk too much about advertising and their personal work ethics..ridiculous!
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By "seewan" on September 27, 2000
Format: Hardcover
The book assume and reader have a certain level of knowledge branding. It does not tell you how and why rather state only the what. The examples and case studies in this book is really pathetic. I feel that half of the book is certainly advertisement for the author's company. In conclusion, this book is definitely not worth reading if you do not have much time to spare.If you are serious about branding look somewhere else.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Maria N. on February 20, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Perhaps with the benefit of hindsight, we can see the flaws in this book more clearly: far too many technology companies attempted to build their "brand" overnight and could not survive the dot-com crash.

Winkler's advice appears more suited to the internal efficiency processes of ad agencies than it does to the strategic guidance such agencies could provide their clients. If I were a technology advertiser, I would be very wary of taking the advice of this book. Given that Winkler Advertising no longer exists should be cause for concern for anyone considering her as an advisor.

There are many credible marketing/brand-building books on the market today, most of which can be found on Amazon. If you want to get solid advice you can trust from an ad agency, read Truth Lies & Advertising from Jon Steel, Eating the Big Fish and The Pirate Inside from Adam Morgan, or Under the Radar from Kirschenbaum & Bond.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Veruka Zdenek on August 3, 2004
Format: Hardcover
This book suggests that effective brands can be built overnight. It is very presumptuous, and also draws too heavily on the author's personal experiences. I don't know how many of her clients survived the dot-com crash on this thinking, but I would not bet my business on it. There are lots of brand-building books available on amazon.com (anything by David Aaker is a good bet) and you would be better served by more responsible advice from other sources.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By MAT on December 20, 2001
Format: Hardcover
I am involved and interested in marketing for high-tech companies and start-ups as a career and purchased this book to help me do very fast "branding" for a start-up. I was greatly disappointed to find most of the information relating to what is possible with technology such as fast information dissemination, and online collaboration, etc. That is good information for people who don't know this stuff is possible, but is not very useful for people looking for a marketing book that will tell you how to "brand" a product any faster than you would normally be able to do it.
I would label the book a "how to work more efficiently" type book for the advertising industry. Not at all useful given its title.
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6 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Liesel Wallace on November 17, 1999
Format: Hardcover
Considering how dynamic the marketing profession is, it is amazing to me what an incrustation of outdated myths it supports. Agnieszka Winkler's book is helpful in demolishing some of these, and in doing so helping readers learn how to think through their complex branding issues, whether they're involved in technology or more conventional products and services. ---Gerry Khermouch, Editor, Brandweek magazine
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Rolf Dobelli HALL OF FAME on June 1, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Advertising expert Agnieszka M. Winkler offers an insider’s perspective on how technology has changed marketing and advertising. Writing with clarity and confidence, she outlines the steps advertisers and marketers must take to keep pace. She cites high-profile companies like Dell Computers and Amazon as examples of brands that were built in months, not years. These examples illustrate her sometimes complex concepts, and make them more accessible. Unfortunately, she also devotes a large amount of space to what amounts to a commercial for an adverting software application that she’s trying to sell. But for readers who can stomach the pitch, we recommend this book to those who work in marketing, advertising, or related industries, and to those who are making the transition to technology-driven brand building. (Editor’s note: TeamToolz, one of the major resources covered in this book, is a pay-for-use service sold by the author.)
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