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Warrior Woman: The Story of Lozen, Apache Warrior and Shaman Hardcover


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 336 pages
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press; First Edition edition (April 1, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312244088
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312244088
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.9 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #426,570 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Little has been written about Lozen, an Apache woman of the late 19th century; even oral accounts are scarce. Yet in this meticulously footnoted conjectural history of the warrior and shaman, Aleshire (The Fox and the Whirlwind), an American studies professor at the State University of Arizona, casts Lozen as a powerful and important leader, her role perhaps deliberately obscured to protect her life. From the 1840s through the 1870s, Lozen fought alongside Geronimo and her brother Victorio, participating in war councils, ambushes of Mexican soldiers, and territorial battles with American settlers and soldiers such as the Battle of Apache Pass, the massacre at Cibecue and countless other struggles. Though the book might have been better billed as historical fiction, Aleshire's informed speculation works well. But his decision to infuse his narrative voice with Native Americanisms--some derived from actual accounts, others apparently from the author's imagination--can seem presumptuous and hackneyed. Aleshire's subjects die from "the spotted disease," they move on course "like an arrow that has left the bow" and they go to "the Happy Place" when killed in battle. Perhaps Apache leaders did compare everything to hawks or deer or falling feathers. Although he tells us from the outset that he's writing this from an Apache viewpoint, in Aleshire's mouth the voice rings false. Only occasionally--as in his discussion of place names or of the complex politics of the Ghost Dances--does his thorough, substantive scholarship outweigh the thin conceit of his narrative voice.

Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

The Apache resistance of the late 19th century is familiar to many Americans. Both famous and notorious, such leaders as Victorio, Mangas Colorado, and Geronimo kept government troops at bay on both sides of the U.S.-Mexican border off and on for more than 40 years. With them, sometimes separately, sometimes together, was Victorio's sister Lozen, a woman of special talent and power, whose importance was unknown to the soldiers in pursuit. Recounting this dramatic period in time from an Apache viewpoint, journalist Aleshire (American studies, Arizona State Univ.; The Fox and the Whirlwind) allows the reader to accompany Lozen's Chihenne Apache band as it struggled to stay in its homeland, confronted by the incomprehensible and often reprehensible behavior of white intruders. As the Apache world was reduced, Lozen's band and others were forced to stay on the move. While it could have used a map, this very readable book pulls together the Apache phase of the so-called Indian wars extremely effectively. Highly recommended for all collections. Mary B. Davis, American Craft Council, New York
Copyright 2001 Reed Business Information, Inc.

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Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 9, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Finally, this warrior woman's story is being told! This well researched biography reads like a novel. Peter Aleshire presents her as a hero to her people. He researches every battle and skirmish and reveals Lozen's known or most probable role in them. He shows that her warrior exploits took up the bulk of her life.
He attempts to write from an Apache viewpoint. I'm not sure if he succeeds, but he does choose Apache sources of information over others, and admits his limitations as an outsider, even as he felt compelled to write this book.
This book desperately needs maps and photographs. There are none. Lozen's life criss-crossed much of the Southwest and Mexico. Mr. Aleshire mentions a famous photograph of Lozen without including it in this volume. I had to go to outside sources to track her movements and see her face. So, I call this book incomplete.
But, I am immensely glad this book has finally been written. It's existence is a hundred years overdue.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 1, 2003
Format: Hardcover
This book, though rather dry at times, is still a fascinating account of a forgotten warrior. Detailing the life of Lozen is a worthy endeavor (though it's been done before in another book called "Lozen: Apache Woman Warrior" - which is also worth reading by the way.) I found this book to be well worth reading, as well - it's one of those history explorations that seem to take you back to the time and place of it's account, and spark your imagination to what the life of the people of that time might have been like. I hope more people read this book so that Lozen's name is not forgotten (as so many great, historical women in other cultures are) I would love it if one day her name were as recognizable as Geronimo or Crazy Horse. Maybe this book will help with that - who knows!
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5 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Momma Stacey on May 2, 2006
Format: Hardcover
The book could be described as "dry" on occasion but it's History, forgotten History at that. I loved Mr.Aleshire's book about a true Hero that so little has been written of. I enjoyed the chapter notes and appreciate that Mr. Aleshire added his own assumptions at time. I had a hard time putting this book down and have recommended it to people I know would enjoy it. My Great-Grandmother mentioned Lozen when I was younger and until I was in High School I thought she was a myth. What a terrible shame it is to know so little about someone so legend worthy.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Vickery on June 18, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
And the repeat is most always sad. This well written (if not completely authentic) biography reminds so much of the conflict in the Middle East.
Who is the terrorist, who is the freedom fighter? I all depends on from which side you look.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Wilderness Guy on February 19, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Peter Aleshire provides a fascinating peek into the Apache mind and way of thinking. Not everyone is an outgoing egomaniac like Geronimo, so it was refreshing to see another perspective that showed how this one warrior -- an Apache woman -- battled very effectively with skill, cunning, and spiritual power, and yet very quietly compared to most other warriors. She let her actions speak for her.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Yoshio on July 11, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
A great and apparent fact based dipiction of the plight of this band of America Indians, and specifically of the warrior woman, Lozan.
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