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Warrior's Song (The Parker Shaw Series) Paperback – April 15, 2011


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 234 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1st edition (April 15, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1461099536
  • ISBN-13: 978-1461099536
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.2 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,857,572 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Warrior’s Song is the first novel by author Thomas M. Hill. An avid student of philosophy, history, politics, and social science, he blends all of these subjects together in a thought-provoking and at times satirical inquiry into the roots of modern American identity and the ageless tension between rationality and spirituality


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Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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I'm ready for the next installment!
Preston Fleming (Author of Forty Days at Kamas)
It is a very different land and culture than he and Sam have grown up in, and it brings much discussion and introspection.
George Jarvis
Indeed this first novel has a literary flair that merges this knowledge effectively into his fictional storyline!
Amazon Customer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on November 11, 2011
Format: Paperback
When you read that this book is the "first in a four-part series that documents some of the most formative years in Parker's life as he crosses the great threshold into adulthood," you may immediately think the book is a typical coming-of-age story... NOT... Thomas M. Hill's bio states that he is "an avid student of philosophy, history, politics, and social science." Indeed this first novel has a literary flair that merges this knowledge effectively into his fictional storyline!

Do you believe in destiny? Do you think an individual can be "called" for a specific purpose? I must admit that as I got involved with this story, I began to hypothesize what Parker Shaw might ultimately be at the end of the series. I found, I automatically began to wonder about his becoming president of the United States...and what an individual might be like as a president who was fulfilling his "destiny."

Would he be the "best ever" leader of our country? Or, would he fail having to deal with "the likes of us" here in America... I admit I was intrigued to consider the...possibility...

Parker Shaw is 20 when we enter his life. He is a student at the University of Virginia, in government. His father was a lawyer and his older brother became a lawyer as well and his family has been pushing him to follow in that path.

His personal interests have never led him to automatically follow so when he has a dream and then several other, shall we say, other-worldly experiences, he begins to really consider what his future holds for him.

Leaving school only meant that he would have a short summer before he returned to the University of Virginia, the school that had been established by Thomas Jefferson, a man for whom Parker had great respect.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By George Jarvis on October 21, 2011
Format: Paperback
This is a well written story of a young man who finds himself at odds with the expectations of family, and society "norms" and has to decide whether to follow the signs that come to him to find his true purpose in life, or to go along with the status quo. Parker Shaw is a college student raised in Maryland and going to college at the University of Virginia with a great interest in Philosophy, History and Politics, and has a special affinity with the writings of Thomas Jefferson and Plato. His family wants him to follow in the footsteps of his father who was a lawyer and a judge, and be like his older brother who is also a succesful lawyer but Parker is aware that this is not what he really wants to do. Being a writer and/or involved in acadamia seems to call to him more but the pressures of following the family traditions and being "successful" like his older brother are ever present.

Parker has had a very intense life like dream of being a Native American in 1700's and being chased in killed. He spends time thinking about it, but for a while he puts it aside and continues with college. At the end of his Junior year, the dream and other experiences he has had in his life leave him with a desire to go to Denver, Colorado for the summer though he can't explain exactly why. His father wants him to get a summer job in a lawyer friend's office but when he goes for an interview, the lawyer friend says some things about Parker being a more "introspective" and "conscious" than most and it reminds him of some things a professor said to him in the past.

Sam, a friend from college connects, and when Parker mentions he has the desire for visiting Denver and the West, Sam is excited and wants to go and has connections in Boulder, Colorado where they can stay.
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By Larry M. Johnson on March 17, 2012
Format: Paperback
Mr. Hill's prose was immaculate. How he exposed Mr. Shaw's very spirit to the reader delightfully historic .
We wait with increased anticipation for the rest of the series.
Very well done
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Format: Paperback
Warrior's Song, the first in a four-part fictional series by Thomas Hill, studies the life of twenty year-old Parker Shaw. Shaw is a descendent of the famous Colonel Robert Gould Shaw, who commanded the first black regiment of the U.S. Army in the Civil War (made famous in the Edward Zwick film, Glory). This novel explores Shaw's coming-of-age struggle with identity, family, purpose and career goals. The novel begins on the campus of The University of Virginia in April 2001 and it ends with the airplane hijackings and bombings of September 11, 2001.

In a strangely vivid dream, Shaw finds himself a Native American warrior pursued and murdered by a group of white men. Like a splinter in his mind, the dream drives Shaw to discover his connection with the murdered Native American. With a friend, he travels to the American Southwest in search of the dream's meaning. In this quest, he encounters a man who provides some perspective and direction. Shaw seeks a powerful revelation of the person he is supposed to be. In return, he is served nuggets of insight and enigma, bound together by a common thread of purpose.

Like so many college students, Shaw is torn between his father's dream for his future and his own uncertainty. Shaw's intellectual self-exploration provides the foundation of this novel. Hill sprinkles the novel's dialog with references to the fundamentals of a liberal arts education, including American history, science, psychology, sociology and philosophy. At first, these references seem unrelated. However, Hill winds them together in an increasingly pertinent existential rationale. Elemental to this exploration are concepts of the human soul, reincarnation and the integration of purpose, fulfilled as a result of Hill's use of nuance and association.
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