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The Wars of Scotland, 1214-1371 (New Edinburgh History of Scotland) Paperback – April 30, 2004

ISBN-13: 978-0748612383 ISBN-10: 0748612386

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The Wars of Scotland, 1214-1371 (New Edinburgh History of Scotland) + Domination and Lordship: Scotland, 1070-1230 (New Edinburgh History of Scotland)
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Product Details

  • Series: New Edinburgh History of Scotland (Book 4)
  • Paperback: 392 pages
  • Publisher: Edinburgh University Press (April 30, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0748612386
  • ISBN-13: 978-0748612383
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 1.3 x 6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,438,032 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

The fruit of recent scholarship is gathered into a fresh, readable, informative, and balanced account.... Highly recommended.

(Choice 1900-01-00)

Michael Brown has done an admirable job... This is a highly readable survey that provides an excellent introduction to the period.

(J.S. Hamilton Scotia 1900-01-00)

This is an important book... This is a superb book that should be widely read.

(Norman Macdougall History)

About the Author


Michael Brown is at the University of St Andrews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By isala on December 10, 2004
Format: Paperback
If you are interested in the historical background to Mel Gibson's Braveheart, this might be the book you want. It turns out that Mel Gibson got the name of William Wallace right, and his stubborn refusal to yield to Edward Longshanks right, but not much else.
Scotland had enjoyed almost a century of internal peace under the kings David I, Alexander II, and Alexander III. When Alexander III died without a male heir the Scottish nobles became uneasy: even if Scotland had stabilized under "the Good King" Alexander, it was still an unruly place with ambituos noblemen and aggresive norse lords in the north and west. When his daughter (the maid of Norway) died in Orkney 1290, the [...] hit the fan - now the throne was up for grabs.
This book describes the old-fashioned political system of the Scottish kingdom, and why it became so vulnerable in a succesional crisis. It then continues with the complex political games in the crisis of the succesion - nobles switched allegiance as often as we change underwear. It is an interesting fact how international the Scottish crisis was: claimants to the throne came from Norway, Flanders, France, and England. The political intruiguing involved not only England and Scotland, but also Gwynnedd, Irish sub-kings, France, Holy Roman Empire, Scandinavia, and the Papal curia. William Wallace turns out to have been a comparatively minor character in all this.
Sometimes the sheer number of names is overwhelming, and there is a lack of pictures. The writing is a bit dry, and the subject gets a very, almost too, scholarly treatment.
The main strengths of the book, I think, are that the author thoroughly describes the causes of the political crisis that led to the wars and that he puts them into their European context.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Theophanu on November 8, 2006
Format: Paperback
This is a very fine, very readable, and thoughtful history of medieval Scotland. It gives a very good context for the Scots "wars of independence." But very, very little of the book is actually about war. Don't go to this book if you want to know in more than the most general terms what happened at Stirling Bridge, Falkirk, or Bannockburn---the longest battle account is about one page.
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By Al Luna on July 30, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Good secondary source. Used for my graduate class. More information then an encyclopedia article and it has a great bibliography.
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