Washing Machine

September 26, 1995 | Format: MP3

$5.99
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
4:42
30
2
4:02
30
3
4:25
30
4
9:33
30
5
6:02
30
6
4:27
30
7
4:33
30
8
4:15
30
9
2:19
30
10
4:12
30
11
19:37
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: September 26, 1995
  • Release Date: September 26, 1995
  • Label: Geffen
  • Copyright: (C) 1995 Geffen Records Inc.
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:08:07
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B000W1TJAE
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (60 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #23,715 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 25 people found the following review helpful By S. R Robertson on December 11, 2001
Format: Audio CD
Having bought several Sonic Youth (based on constant advice to get into their stuff) at the same time, I was blown away at just how good and amazing their materail is, as well as different each time around. While WM may not be the most innovative or lyrically powerful as other SY albums, it sets a mood which seems to give a modern touch to 60s suburbia or something, with a good mixture of the beautiful and the deranged...it's almost like it's through the eyes of a lost teenager running through a neighborhood at night, half hopped on LCD.
The most transcendant tracks are "Unwind" (very emotional even naysay blissful poetry about kites caught in the stars becoming morning), "Little Trouble Girl" (60s soul inspired flow through the eyes of a coming-of-age girl, features great back vocals from Breeders frontwoman Kim Deal and a few others), "Skip Tracer" (definitely owes some inspiration to Jack Kerouac's On The Road, Renaldo poetry at its finest), "Saucer-Like"(easy going tune about extraterrestrials flying through the cities in "a wonderful vision"), and ofcourse the brilliamt 20 minute epic "The Diamond Sea", pshychadelic lyrics and music that is the transcender of all transcenders. The rest are just as awesome, the title track has Kim Gordon talking about taking her baby down the pop machine and "spinning round like a washing machine, never saw the devil look so **** clean", it also has spacy freak-out guitars (but since that seems to be an SY trademark, I won't even mention it anymore). "Panty Lies" is an intense tale of alienation which resembles unusually that old Jetsons pop song in chorus, "No Queen Blues" and "Becuz" are just plain rocking, and "Junkie's Promise" will send a chill of truth down any (...) addict's spine without being too judgemental. There's also the unnamed track 9 which is filler but it's nice to get something a little softer after such good rock. Washing Machine is a lost classic which every fan should have, a suburbian adventure I must say.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 27, 1999
Format: Audio CD
I don't mean to start a debate among Sonic Youth fans, but this might be their best album aside from "Daydream Nation." Most of the songs on the album are played with three guitars and no bass. This frees up more space for Sonic Youth's dissonant guitar stylings. The swirling guitars sounds on "Becuz" and "Junkie's Promise" only foreshadow the large walls of noise in "No Queen Blues," "Washing Machine" and "The Diamond Sea." SY even tries new genres, showing their own take on Motown with the blissful "Little Trouble Girl," their take on ambient music with the untitled track (the instrumental sequel to "Becuz," which is just as soothing and simultaneously eerie as one of Brian Eno's early ambient records such as "Ambient 1" and "Discreet Music"), and Japanese hardcore with "Panty Lies," which seems inspired by Yoshimi from the Boredoms and Kim Gordon's sidegroup Free Kitten. Even "Unwind," with its subdued crescendo, rises above most of the material on all of their previous DGC albums. This album does two things for them: it frees them from attempting "mainstream" songs and secondly, it places them back in the underground. This album sold considerably fewer copies than any of their previous DGC albums. This album divides many SY fans, but I think it is the best thing they have released in the 1990's.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Paul H. on December 8, 2001
Format: Audio CD
Washing Machine is great Sonic Youth. Although I'd personally go with Daydream Nation or Sister first, Washing Machine might be a good way for those new to the group to become introduced. The production is raw, but the sound is more clear which adds to the music. "Becuz" is a great opener with its incredibly catchy chords while "Junkie's Promise," the title track, and "Skip Tracer" are all great songs. But of course, "The Diamond Sea" is worth the price of the album. See all these reviews hyping it up? Well, believe the hype. It's amazing. Definitely one of my fav. Sonic Youth tracks. Twenty minutes of melody that spirals into chaotic noise. Brilliant. Every fan of Sonic Youth must own this song. Even without it, Washing Machine is a great album so definitely give this a spin.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By J. M. Zuurbier on December 10, 2001
Format: Audio CD
WASHING MACHINE returns Sonic Youth to the ringing electric guitars, clever songwriting and multi-layered arrangements that are the band's calling card. Not the casual acoustic sigh of its predecessor, EXPERIMENTAL JET SET, TRASH AND NO STAR, WASHING MACHINE's electricity gives Sonic Youth new life.
With its sprawling guitar noise, "The Diamond Sea" recalls the GOO-era "Mote," proving that the crunching metallic waves that once made Sonic Youth so impressive are back. "Junkie's Promise" trembles with distortion and shimmering melodic phrases, while "Saucer-Like" brings the band's clamoring two-guitar dynamic back into focus. This is the band's triumph--their sound is easier to digest, and invites the listeners to re-examine their strengths.
WASHING MACHINE is also a return to form in terms of songwriting. "Panty Lies" continues Kim Gordon's hipster manifesto series, giving us another glimpse of the world from her perspective--"oh how rude," she sneers, "at least I got your attention, square." "Skip Tracer" hints at Sonic Youth's position as baby-sitters for the next generation of alternative rockers, but isn't condescending. In fact, it's one of the best moments on the album. A description of a singer "shouting the poetic truths of high school journal takers" exemplifies the age gap between Sonic Youth and the new generation, but it doesn't alienate them. It's just such awareness that makes WASHING MACHINE work. Sonic Youth's respect for the scene they helped create will forever keep them on top of the indie heap.
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