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The Waste Land and Other Poems (Broadview Anthology of British Literature) Paperback – December 21, 2010


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Product Details

  • Series: Broadview Anthology of British Literature
  • Paperback: 148 pages
  • Publisher: Broadview Press; Reprint edition (December 21, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1551119684
  • ISBN-13: 978-1551119687
  • Product Dimensions: 5.4 x 8.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (35 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #557,939 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

After sitting through T.S. Eliot's reading of "The Waste Land," listeners may be inclined to hang up the earphones for a spell. There are no flaws to Eliot's steady-toned interpretation; in fact, his delivery is quite remarkable in its ability to match the poem's constant, somber mood. It's just that 25-plus minutes of Eliot's desolate landscapes--rendered even more real by the author's incessant tones--can wear on the emotions.

In addition to the full-length version of "The Waste Land," this recording includes Eliot's stirring narration of "The Hollow Men," "Sweeney Among the Nightingales," and "Macavity the Mystery Cat." Listen to Eliot read from "The Waste Land." Visit our audio help page for more information. (Running time: 47 minutes, 1 cassette) --Rob McDonald --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

Along with the two title pieces, this collection includes "Portrait of a Lady," "Rhapsody on a Windy Night," "Gerontion," and numerous other Eliot greats. To have these poems in a single volume that costs roughly the price of a candy bar is nothing less than a miracle. (Classic Returns, LJ 12/98)
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

I think the whole thing is in learning how to read it.
Marty
To perhaps at least as many, he is overblown and overrated, pretentious and portentous, responsible for ruining all that was great about pre-Modern poetry.
Bill R. Moore
As a Hebrew writer and publisher I read T.S. Eliot in Hebrew translation and love to read original The Waste Land in English.
Amazon Customer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Enlightenment Man on October 20, 2005
Format: Paperback
I found this edition by Penguin to be very useful for a casual reading. The notes on the poems, in particular "the Waste Land," are detailed enough to give the reader a perception of Eliot's vast literary knowledge and its effect on his poems. However, the notes are inadequate if your purpose is to deeply understand the background of Eliot's complex and difficult poetry. So if you are looking for deep insights, I would recommend the Norton Critical Edition. For the normal reader, this is satisfying and straightforward.
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19 of 22 people found the following review helpful By "cailleachx" on April 9, 2001
Format: Paperback
T.S. Eliot wrote "The Waste Land" against the backdrop of a world gone mad-- searching for reason inside chaos, and striving to build an ark of words by which future generations could learn what had gone before, T.S. Eliot explores that greatest of human melancholy-- disillusionment. This is a difficult poem, but one well-worth exploring to its fullest. The inherent rhythms of Eliot's speech, the delightful, though sometimes obscure, allusions, and intricate word-craft, create an atmosphere of civilization on the edge-- in danger of forgetting its past, and therefore repeating it. In the end, only the poet is left, to admonish the world to peace, to preserve the ruins of the old life, and to ensure that future generations benefit from the disillusions of the past.
"Prufrock" is perhaps the best "mid-life crisis" poem ever written. In witty, though self-deprecating and often downright bitter, tones, Eliot goes on a madcap but infinitely somber romp through the human mind. This is a poem of contradictions, of repression, of human fear, and human self-defeat. Technically, "Prufrock" is brilliant, with a varied and intricate style suited to the themes of madness, love, and self-doubt.
Buy this. You won't regret it. If you're an Eliot fan, you probably have it anyway. If you're not, you will be when you put it down.
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11 of 14 people found the following review helpful By "Disappointed" on November 21, 2007
Format: Audio CD
The Waste Land

From the listing this item appears to be a recording of The Waste Land by T.S. Eliot, read by the poet himself; but it's not, it's a performance by another reader, and therefore it had (to me) no interest; it was not what I wanted or needed. I suggest that the product description should be made clearer, so that other customers do not make the same mistake.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A. Woods on March 20, 2009
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I don't know what the description of the book is referring to or what the other reviewers are talking about. This is just the text of The Waste Land, with no notes, no translations of the parts that aren't in English and no other poems. It isn't even formatted correctly - there are a handful of notes that have been left in the text of the poem. This is a poem with a lot of layers to it and some explanation is standard. This edition has none. Do yourself a favor and don't buy it.

I only spent 49 cents on this but I still feel ripped off.
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12 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Paul Stilwell on May 30, 2005
Format: Paperback
I remember when I first read through some parts of 'The Wasteland' when I was a teenager. I basically didn't get any of it, yet there was something that vividly burned itself in my mind. All that I could remember from the first reading was the departure of some nymphs and wind crossing brown land, a slimy rat's belly dragging across a bank, and some sailor on the bed of the sea being picked apart by a deep sea current. But it wasn't just the images that stuck; there was something else. What stuck, I think, is the 'visionary' quality some people refer to as being 'cinematic'. The writing in the poem has a way of getting you to view a whole assortment of apparently disconnected events as though you were a disembodied spirit -unnoticed, but there, listening in. I've read the poem quite a few more times since then, and you begin to notice the overall structure. When the poem gets to the last part, 'What the Thunder said', there is this transition that is at once magnificent, sobering, yet somewhat hallucinatory and disturbing. This part always gets me:

"Who is the third who walks always beside you?

When I count, there are only you and I together

But when I look ahead up the white road

There is always another walking beside you

Gliding wrapt in a brown mantle, hooded

I do not know whether a man or a woman

-But who is that on the other side of you?"

'The Wasteland' is perhaps the least 'telly' of Eliot's work.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Katherine M. Murrell on January 30, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Why oh why are the lines of this poem arranged so they run one after another like prose? It is not set like it should be, with lines on their own and arranged in proper stanzas; it's all mushed together in a series of run-on paragraphs. Absolutely horrible.
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By Adam on October 6, 2000
Format: Paperback
The Waste Land, published in 1922 and considered one of the major works associated with modernism. This poem deals despairingly with the state of post-World War I society, which Eliot saw as sterile and decadent. Numerous references to religious imagery, mythology and literature of the past are used ironically to point out the comparative emptiness of Eliot's time.
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