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Watch Out Perfect Paperback – April 14, 2006


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Perfect Paperback, April 14, 2006
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Product Details

  • Perfect Paperback: 210 pages
  • Publisher: FLF Press; 1 edition (April 14, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1891855778
  • ISBN-13: 978-1891855771
  • Product Dimensions: 5.4 x 8.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (73 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,607,865 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Hopefully, you'll take my advice and FIND THIS BOOK! It is a page-turner, an eye-opening, fantastic trip. I simply couldn't put it down, I just had to keep on reading; I had to see what would happen next... I laughed out loud so much---more so than anything I can think of..."
-- Reviewer Magazine, September 10, 2006

"Hopefully, you'll take my advice and FIND THIS BOOK! It is a page-turner, an eye-opening, fantastic trip. I simply couldn't put it down, I just had to keep on reading; I had to see what would happen next... I laughed out loud so much---more so than anything I can think of..."

Review

"Hopefully, you'll take my advice and FIND THIS BOOK! It is a page-turner, an eye-opening, fantastic trip. I simply couldn't put it down, I just had to keep on reading; I had to see what would happen next... I laughed out loud so much---more so than anything I can think of..."

More About the Author

This is Dr. Joseph Suglia. Be sure to purchase the 2008 Definitive Version of WATCH OUT -- the image of a steak filet is emblazoned on its cover. Avoid the 2006 edition; riddled with errors, it is a mangled infant. I disavow the 2006 edition, which is now rightfully out of print.

Customer Reviews

I neither know anyone like, nor care anything about JB.
Credit Matters
Whilst, beautifully written, with a good smattering of humour, sex and violence, it is a deeply disturbing novel.
Paul House
The very presence of the public and society has him seething on the inside.
A. Richard Salanitri

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

37 of 44 people found the following review helpful By Jonny G on May 7, 2011
Format: Perfect Paperback
I had to force my way through this book as a favor for a friend. The pain I felt reading this book mirrored the torture of listening to nails on a chalkboard or worse, listening to bad pop music. Watch Out is a terrible attempt to be relevant and smart that falls so far off the mark that it's best used as attic insulation. I'm not sure what this loser is a doctor of, but it's probably the same doctoral degree that dr. pepper and dr. dre received. Joseph Suglia is a complete joke.
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20 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Lucas on March 26, 2012
Format: Perfect Paperback
Joseph Suglia is perhaps the most condescending, self-absorbed human on the face of this blue earth. His having published a novel is proof that there is no God. A world in which I must share the sweet, life-sustaining gift of oxygen with Joseph Suglia is no world I wish to live in. May he descend into rampant and debilitating alcoholism.
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29 of 35 people found the following review helpful By SuzieMac on December 10, 2007
Format: Perfect Paperback Verified Purchase
I adore comedy, philosophy and I appreciate dark humor. This book is for shock value. An intelligent reader will hopefully not fall into the ego trap, "only an elite reader will understand this book". It will leave one feeling dirty and mentally dismembered. It is not really all that funny, although it is meant to be tongue in cheek. I did not want this book in my house when I finished reading it, so I threw it in the recycle bin. It reminded me of a ouji board that I had to dipose of lest it beome a vortex to bring evil into the room. Yes, it was that strange. Not worth wasting one's time. If you value your brain and find your sensibilities to be sacred, avoid this book.
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Format: Perfect Paperback
Suglia hopes to make an impression with his novel "Watch Out". "Watch out" is the refrain, throughout, a heightened state of alert pumped into the brain stem with no explanation and no true context. "Watch Out" is the story, or several stories, of Professor Jonathan Barrows, a cold, violent, self-pleasuring egoist.

The world of Jonathan Barrows is grotesque, stupid, and, like Jonathan Barrows, focused on Jonathan Barrows. While it is not rare for characters to have an exceptionally large ego, in this case Jonathan's view of the world is largely corroborated by the world's responses to him--even taking into account the self-colored glasses we're reading through.

Jonathan Barrows is the pinnacle of humanity--so far removed that he, at times, considers himself not a member of humanity at all; while at other times he considers himself the only human. We join him on a trip to a small college town where he is to have an interview, and the first half of the book follows that arc--from the filth-ridden train that introduces us to Jonathan's contempt all the way through to a FINAL SHOWDOWN ORGY with his interviewer.

The latter half of the book is comprised of increasingly violent and surreal vignettes of Jonathan's formative years, plus one farewell send-off to cap things--the only indication in the whole work that there might be some semblance of law and order in the world represented.

Jonathan's incessant auto-arousal grows tiresome, but is balanced with the surreal abusement and dislivingmentation of a number of other parties. Suglia pushes the human body's natural resilience to absurd and engrossing dimensions with his vivid descriptions.
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26 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Mark Eremite VINE VOICE on June 22, 2007
Format: Perfect Paperback
There are three things that make a novel worth reading: the story, the characters, or the writing itself. Finding a book that gets all three right is rare enough, but even rarer (I've noticed) is finding a book that gets the most important one right: the writing. It doesn't matter how clever your plot or how interesting your characters, if you can't write with some measure of skill, you are -- let's face it -- a hack.

(Nothing against hacks, per se. The name itself sounds derived from the blunt, utilitarian chops used to fell a tree, and although the process lacks precision or grace, there's no arguing it gets the job done.)

If there's one thing that can be said about Suglia's "Watch Out," it is that the man is not a hack. He can most certainly write. Every once in a while the prose is scarred by a clumsy cliche ("hard as diamonds") or made flatulent with a preponderance of ten-dollar words, but I'm not entirely sure such missteps aren't intentional. After all, the rest of the writing is so accomplished and organic, it's hard to imagine the man penning it would allow it to be flawed by anything that isn't intentionally self-mutilating.

And there's a hell of a lot of mutilation in the book. The mucilanginous metaphors sometimes drip, sometimes spurt off the page, recalling Burrough's Naked Lunch or Ellis's American Psycho. People lose toes, get shot, vomit torrents of orange fluid, and have their faces removed. And the scatology? Well, let's just say a lot of folks in the book forget to flush.

I think Suglia forgot to do some flushing, too.
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15 of 19 people found the following review helpful By D. Shirley on February 17, 2007
Format: Perfect Paperback
WATCH OUT'S Jonathan Barrow's is the contemporary embodiment of Max Stirner's singular "I" against all others, from the fawning, desperate desire of the inconsequential other (for Barrows, a ubiquitous irritant) to the more consuming, rapacious advances of the collective in all of its forms. Arriving for an interview at a small-town community college near the shores of Lake Michigan, Barrows emerges over the course of the novel as an oddly inverted relative to The Castle's K., repeatedly frustrated in his attempts to gain access to the inner sanctum of the decidedly non-respectable institution and routinely hounded by the cloying, insatiable multitude of misfits that surround (and occasionally invade) his tiny hotel room. On first reading (there will definitely be many others), I found the book to be a remarkably compelling and substantial work -- with an astonishing capacity to disorient and disturb. I found the Intermission (a visionary sequence in which the individual is invaded and liquified by the crowd) and the four short, violent vignettes in the coda particularly exhaustive and disturbing, in much the same way that I've found myself to be absolutely horrified (but simultaneously fascinated) by Thomas Ligotti's best stories and the torture sequence near the end of Takashi Miike's Audition. I'm afraid I may be among "the feeble minded" multitude that Breton and Bataille predicted would inevitably be shocked and irritated by transgressive writing and imagery.Read more ›
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