Warm Water Under a Red Bridge (English Subtitled) 2001 NR

Amazon Instant Video

(43) IMDb 6.9/10
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A down-and-out businessman travels to a seaside town, where he meets a woman with unusual sexual powers. (Japanese with English subtitles)

Starring:
Kôji Yakusho, Misa Shimizu
Runtime:
1 hour, 51 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

Warm Water Under a Red Bridge (English Subtitled)

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Product Details

Genres Drama, Romance, Comedy
Director Shôhei Imamura
Starring Kôji Yakusho, Misa Shimizu
Supporting actors Mitsuko Baishô, Mansaku Fuwa, Isao Natsuyagi, Yukiya Kitamura, Hijiri Kojima, Toshie Negishi, Sumiko Sakamoto, Gadarukanaru Taka, Mickey Curtis, Takao Yamada, Katsuo Nakamura, Kazuo Kitamura
Studio Indie Crush
MPAA rating NR (Not Rated)
Rental rights 7-day viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

45 of 55 people found the following review helpful By darragh o'donoghue on May 13, 2002
A sublimely skewered shaggy-dog sex comedy from Shohei Imamura that takes up where Edward Yang's sober 'Yi-Yi' left off, and pulls it into a completely unexpected direction. Like Yang's film, Imamura's protagonist, Yosuke Sasano, is a computer programmer in crisis (in this case his business has gone under); he now spends his time being insulted by his horrid, hectoring wife on the phone, and living with river-side tramps. Like Yang's film, Imamura diagnoses the spiritual void at the heart of Far Eastern super-corporate economic success - one very Yang-like shot views Yosuke attending an interview from behind a chillingly impersonal window; the distance between viewer and protagonist makes his desperate grovelling to the Kafkaesque manager all the more pathetic - but his prescription couldn't be more different.
Initially, the film seems as methodical and meticulous in composition and tone as we would expect from a severe Oriental master, with complicated, multi-level, multi-frame compositions (the geometry of character groupings imposed on the geometry of place - see the triangle of friends overlooking the corpse in his tent in the opening sequence) staged thoughtfully for a static camera that picks out only the essential elements of each image. This staticness doensn't mean each shot is devoid of internal tension - for instance, the opening tracking long-shot that follows the policemen in the direction of the hut, works against the movement of the river, and is a brilliant, if wrong-footing visual introduction of the film's themes (the disjunction and perversion of the natural in modern life etc.).
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Dwight on November 20, 2006
Format: VHS Tape
I've only seen this movie and The Eel by this director but I love the director and his female lead very much because of this movie Warm Water Under a Red Bridge. It was a wonderful life affirming viewing experience that made me laugh out loud a few times. I was looking forward to seeing more movies in this warmer style (I wasn't as fond of The Eel) but sadly, the director passed away - an old man. In any case, this movie makes me happy just thinking about it and knowing someone salty and humorous was out there thinking up these things makes me smile right now. He was so naughty!
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Sheckie Green on June 3, 2006
Format: DVD
Working in the vein of magical realism, director Shohei Imamura spins a yarn of Yosuke (Koji Yakusho), an unemployed salaryman who lives on the dole in Tokyo. He wires his welfare money to his estranged wife while living in "the lower depths" with colorful characters such as Taro (Kazuo Kitramura), "the Blue Tent Philosopher." Prompted by Taro's death and his past encouragement to seize the moment while he can still get a hard-on, Yosuke travels to a small seaside Noto village in search of Taro's long-left treasure.

Once there, Yosuke falls in with the locals who surpass the expected "quirky locals" stereotypes and, instead, appear closer to interesting individuals. At the center of Yosuke's attention is Saeko (Misa Shimizu), a soggy strumpet who, like her (apparently) senile grandmother, suffers from an ailment where she retains water in a most unusual way.

Imamura focuses on issues of filial piety, virility and love with wry, ribald humor. WARM WATER is a delight and a wonderfully light-hearted romp by a seasoned master.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By wiredweird HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWER on August 7, 2007
Format: Amazon Instant Video
Yosuke is a crumbling salaryman - but not really, since the salary isn't coming in any more. In a culture of lifetime employment, mid-career changes are difficult if not actually disreputable, so there's pressure to get a new job, any job. Hoping to find better chances outside of Tokyo, he lands in a fishing village, with a half-believed story of hidden treasure. What he finds instead is cute Saeko, wearing a long loose skirt (there's a reason for that). She's stealing something insignificant from a store, and standing in a puddle on the store's otherwise dry floor.

Obsessed, he hunts her down. When he finds her, she grabs him and makes love right there, with completely unexpected outcome. She has this little problem, you see, and can only relieve it by doing something naughty - like stealing, or ravishing a surprised stranger. Relief comes in the form of a magical "venting" of water, gallons of it, jets of it, and not one of the usual human excreta. She finds him extremely relieving and, in a charming twist, her outpouring turns out to match a kinky side that Yosuke didn't even know he had.

It's pretty silly, and the sexual themes never cross over to real eroticism (unless you share a kink with Yosuke). The story, such as it is, wanders rather aimlessly between an African student on an athletic scholarship, a street thug, a fishing boat, and a sweet young woman with a little problem. In the end, it's a problem they kind of like.

-- wiredweird
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By LGwriter on September 6, 2004
Format: DVD
We must love how life flows and to do that, we drink deeply; we imbibe the water of life, bathe in it, swim in it, flood ourselves with it. Such is the environment of this film, Imamura's 2001 work, a perfect fusion of real and surreal.

A young woman who fills with water--not urine, but pure water--which can only be "vented" with sexual release finds a willing partner in an older businessman who's lost his job. The man, an urban dweller (Tokyo) meets the woman, a rural denizen (small seaside town), when he follows his dead friend's instructions on recovering a "buried treasure" the friend hid in a house that's now occupied by the water woman.

Water as the essence of life, linked to sexuality, is also the environment of Francois Ozon's miraculously great film Swimming Pool, but here it is given a unique treatment by Imamura who uses, similarly, a young woman as his focus. But here, unlike in Swimming Pool, the male is a major character; here, Imamura gives us both sides of the sexuality coin, male and female, and gives us, because of that, a more flowing film that fills the viewer with the essence of living for the moment. By concentrating on the female, and leaving the male aside, Ozon took an approach that was more penetrating, analytical, psychological. Imamura's way is a more emotive one.

Though radically different from Imamura's prior film, The Eel, it nevertheless shares the same involvement of those whose lives are shaped by day to day necessities, those who live by working every day to survive. The male's transition from corporate sales in Tokyo to fisherman in a small town gives us what Imamura wants us to experience; maybe Oingo Boingo's great song "Wild Sex in the Working Class" comes to mind.
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