Warm Water Under a Red Bridge (English Subtitled) 2001 NR

Amazon Instant Video

(42) IMDb 6.9/10
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A down-and-out businessman travels to a seaside town, where he meets a woman with unusual sexual powers. (Japanese with English subtitles)

Starring:
Kôji Yakusho, Misa Shimizu
Runtime:
1 hour, 51 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

Warm Water Under a Red Bridge (English Subtitled)

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Product Details

Genres Drama, Romance, Comedy
Director Shôhei Imamura
Starring Kôji Yakusho, Misa Shimizu
Supporting actors Mitsuko Baishô, Mansaku Fuwa, Isao Natsuyagi, Yukiya Kitamura, Hijiri Kojima, Toshie Negishi, Sumiko Sakamoto, Gadarukanaru Taka, Mickey Curtis, Takao Yamada, Katsuo Nakamura, Kazuo Kitamura
Studio Indie Crush
MPAA rating NR (Not Rated)
Rental rights 7-day viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

45 of 55 people found the following review helpful By darragh o'donoghue on May 13, 2002
A sublimely skewered shaggy-dog sex comedy from Shohei Imamura that takes up where Edward Yang's sober 'Yi-Yi' left off, and pulls it into a completely unexpected direction. Like Yang's film, Imamura's protagonist, Yosuke Sasano, is a computer programmer in crisis (in this case his business has gone under); he now spends his time being insulted by his horrid, hectoring wife on the phone, and living with river-side tramps. Like Yang's film, Imamura diagnoses the spiritual void at the heart of Far Eastern super-corporate economic success - one very Yang-like shot views Yosuke attending an interview from behind a chillingly impersonal window; the distance between viewer and protagonist makes his desperate grovelling to the Kafkaesque manager all the more pathetic - but his prescription couldn't be more different.
Initially, the film seems as methodical and meticulous in composition and tone as we would expect from a severe Oriental master, with complicated, multi-level, multi-frame compositions (the geometry of character groupings imposed on the geometry of place - see the triangle of friends overlooking the corpse in his tent in the opening sequence) staged thoughtfully for a static camera that picks out only the essential elements of each image. This staticness doensn't mean each shot is devoid of internal tension - for instance, the opening tracking long-shot that follows the policemen in the direction of the hut, works against the movement of the river, and is a brilliant, if wrong-footing visual introduction of the film's themes (the disjunction and perversion of the natural in modern life etc.).
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Dwight on November 20, 2006
Format: VHS Tape
I've only seen this movie and The Eel by this director but I love the director and his female lead very much because of this movie Warm Water Under a Red Bridge. It was a wonderful life affirming viewing experience that made me laugh out loud a few times. I was looking forward to seeing more movies in this warmer style (I wasn't as fond of The Eel) but sadly, the director passed away - an old man. In any case, this movie makes me happy just thinking about it and knowing someone salty and humorous was out there thinking up these things makes me smile right now. He was so naughty!
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Michael L. White on June 3, 2006
Format: DVD
Working in the vein of magical realism, director Shohei Imamura spins a yarn of Yosuke (Koji Yakusho), an unemployed salaryman who lives on the dole in Tokyo. He wires his welfare money to his estranged wife while living in "the lower depths" with colorful characters such as Taro (Kazuo Kitramura), "the Blue Tent Philosopher." Prompted by Taro's death and his past encouragement to seize the moment while he can still get a hard-on, Yosuke travels to a small seaside Noto village in search of Taro's long-left treasure.

Once there, Yosuke falls in with the locals who surpass the expected "quirky locals" stereotypes and, instead, appear closer to interesting individuals. At the center of Yosuke's attention is Saeko (Misa Shimizu), a soggy strumpet who, like her (apparently) senile grandmother, suffers from an ailment where she retains water in a most unusual way.

Imamura focuses on issues of filial piety, virility and love with wry, ribald humor. WARM WATER is a delight and a wonderfully light-hearted romp by a seasoned master.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Kev on January 7, 2007
Format: DVD
Mr. Darragh O'Donoghue's review pretty much says it all, but I can't help but add my voice to the chorus of praise and try to lift this one to 5 star status!

Imamura makes complicated, multi-layered films where the drama becomes so involved that the intentions of the characters can sometimes get muddled, and crucial plot points often pop up much later than we're used to. It's kinda like life!

Yasuke (played by the always likable Koji Yakusho) is an unemployed salaryman visiting his hobo/philosopher buddy, Taro, while away from home on a job interview. Taro dies, but his tall tales of treasure in a small village home compel Yasuke to investigate. The house is near a red bridge...

To make a long story short; Yasuke finds the red bridge, and the house, and a beautiful woman living there, Saeko (played by the erotically coy Misa Shimuzu) and a torrid and, ahem... unusual affair begins.

A wild cast of characters, bizarre circumstances, and comical situations play throughout the film, but one thing I really enjoyed was the almost Herzog like physicality of this film. It somehow drives home the life affirming purity of sex. I noticed it from the first moment Yasuke reaches that beautiful red bridge and slaps his hand solidly on the railing. Yasuke gets a job as a fisherman (very physical work) and pulls up nets full of big tuna, he outruns an African Olympic runner (who is training w/ his Japanese coach throughout the film) to be with Saeko. Yakusho gives a very lively and physical performance against Imamura's bright and colorful palette. This is in sharp contrast to the job interview scene and the scene with the nagging phone call from Yasuke's hateful wife, which are shot behind sterile, impersonal panes of glass.
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