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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on January 2, 2013
We installed this toilet fill valve after noticing an intermittent drip from our hot water tank's temperature and pressure (T&P) relief valve. We began noticing that the hot water tank would usually drip a few cups of water shortly after using the shower, washing dishes, or washing clothes with hot water. I purchased a water pressure gauge from a local hardware store and attached it to the drain of the water heater. Normally our home has water pressure of about 50 PSI. When the tank was dripping, it was up to 135 PSI. Since we have a check valve just off of the main water line, when our hot water tank started heating up the cold water, the expanding hot water had nowhere to go and built up high pressure in our pipes. The only place this extra pressure could be released was through the hot water tank's T&P valve.

We also had problems with faucets leaking and fixture seals wearing out quickly, and the toilet would randomly run without reason. These problems were also side effects of the high water pressure we were seeing. The high pressure was looking for some way to escape, and that usually manifested in a leaky kitchen faucet or dripping hot water tank. Usually, a thermal expansion tank is installed to correct these problems associated with the high pressure caused by heating the water. However, we did not really have a good place to install the expansion tank, and it would have also required us to call in a plumber. At the time, the cost and labor to install the expansion tank was an extra expense we couldn't afford.

After doing some research, I found the Watts Governor 80. This toilet fill valve has the unique feature of a built-in pressure relieve valve. When the water pressure goes above 80 PSI, it releases the excess water into the toilet tank, thus lowering the pressure in the pipes. It saves the pipes, faucets, washing machine, and water tank from excess wear and tear due to high pressure and stopped our water tank from leaking. It has also stopped the random leaking faucets and running toilet as well. I had concerns that this fill valve might be constantly letting excess water into the toilet tank and wasting water, but I haven't noticed this at all. It seems to let off just enough pressure when needed, and I've only once heard the fill valve letting off pressure for a brief moment in the month that it has been installed. It really does act as a normal fill value with no additional noise or excess running, but it's silently working in the background to relieve pressure in the pipes, and that's the beauty of it. This is definitely a much cheaper solution than calling a plumber and installing a thermal expansion tank, and it has completely resolved the problem with our dripping hot water tank in the one month that it has been installed.

Installation was very easy and the included directions were clear. There's also a video by Watts on YouTube, and on their website, showing step-by-step directions on how to install the fill valve. This was my first attempt and installing a fill valve, and I was able to successfully finish the job in about 35 minutes. The fill valve also has some other good features. It has built in leak detection, which prevents the toilet from constantly running if there's a problem. And you can also adjust the amount of water entering the bowl when flushing to help prevent against wasting water. This product also came with a new flapper as well, so it's basically a toilet repair kit.

Overall I am very happy with the Watts Governor 80, enough so to write a few paragraphs on something as common as a toilet fill valve. It has completely resolved the issues with the hot water tank dripping, our leaky kitchen faucet, and running toilet, all at a very affordable price. A 5 star product and would definitely recommend it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on December 17, 2012
I bought this since I was noticing higher water pressure after using hot water. The water pressure wasn't high except after using hot water which let me know that it wasn't caused by city water. I installed this instead of an expansion tank due to the low cost and not concerned with the small amount of water loss associated with this. Installation was easy, but the included tank seal was a beveled edge which i found to leak, so I used the old seal and it worked fine. I monitored my water pressure after install and it never gets above 80psi and the pressure release from this is just a small drip during high pressure times that you cannot hear or notice. Great product.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on December 21, 2013
I recently had a new regulator installed on my house, which unknown to me and different from the last one, had a one way check valve, there by making my piping in the house a closed system. In the past, when my hot water heater kicked on and built up pressure, that pressure was pushed back to the street. With the check valve on the new regulator, that pressure built up in my house (upwards of 120psi? w/ cpvc piping) until the Temp & Pressure safety valve on the Hot water heater released the excess pressure, which meant the pressure was constant in my piping around 120psi until someone opened a faucet and released it. When the hot water heater kicked on again, the process repeated. Im lucky my pipes didnt burst. I wish the plumber installing the new regulator had given me a heads up, but consumer beware I guess.

So after hours of research later, looking for solutions on Thermal Expansion, I was left to decide between this $16 item (my local plumber supply sold them for > $75 so either they had better version or huge markup) and a thermal expansion tank (around $60 if you install it yourself, prob ~ $200 if plumber does it).

Comparison between Watts Governor vs Thermal Expansion Tank
Watts Governor
Pros:
-can install it myself in < 15 min, video on Watts Youtube channel showed step by step.
-price. $16 and included everything needed including flapper. A FluidMaster LeakSentry sold at big box stores without a pressure release, flapper, fill valve adjustor runs the same price
-when releases excess pressure, through slow drip, that water goes into the toilet tank, so you can reuse that water next time you flush your toilet and it wont go to waste. If you never use that toilet, it will eventually go into the overflow tube and down the drain so Id recommend you install this on a toilet used often, instead of a spare bedroom or basement. I would guess that it will drip about 20-30oz of water after water heater kicks on in my system.

Cons:
- Pressure not adjustable. Its fixed at 80psi, which is max recommended safe limit for home plumbing.
- Seemed to start weeping at 75psi on my house, so if you have high water pressure in house, this may not be ideal.
- The difference in normal regulated pressure, and the 80psi may lead to a small blast of water when you open a faucet. My normal house water pressure is set to 45psi

Ultimately the expansion tank is the solution to the problem (and now required my code in my area), in that it will keep your pressure constant, and keeps water in the closed system. But until I get around to installing a new hot water heater and easily add in an expansion tank, this is an ideal solution to keep your pressure from getting too high.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on May 28, 2013
Purchased the unit for it's pressure relief capability which seems to work as advertised.
I am going to return it or toss it due to the fact that after flushing it often fails to refill the bowl. No amount of adjustment will fix it.
Cheaply made piece of cr#* made in china.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on January 21, 2014
By far the cheapest hot water expansion 'fix' available - if you have a hot water heater that's regularly opening the pressure valve (especially in the mornings) and you don't have an expansion tank, this is a cheap way to prevent that from happening. By installing this in the toilet, the increased water pressure on the cold water side of the hot water tank will cause the toilet to run and flush rather than emptying the hot water heater through the copper pressure relief line. It's not the best solution (an expansion tank is the 'right' fix), but it works good enough. Keep in mind, though, that if your toilet ever clogs you may find yourself on the wrong side of an ugly overflow, because the relief valve can then cause unwanted 'flushes', overflowing the toilet and causing you a problem.
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on March 22, 2015
I noticed water on the floor from the TP relief valve of the water heater. The water heater is about 13 1/2 years old, and I never had water before. Hooking up a pressure gauge to the water heater drain valve, I noticed that it hits 130-135 psi at the peak. When the weather is really cold like this year, bigger differential temperature occasionally makes it hit 150 psi, the setting on the relief valve. From what I read, one should keep the water pressure to be below 80 psi, or else it may damage the piping system somewhere in the long run. I was contemplating installation of an expansion tank, but the instruction of the Watts pressure gauge mentioned Governor 80. Looking up in Amazon and found this equivalent filler valve from Watts. It looks like easy installation for DIY, so I gave it a try. Wow, this thing really works. As soon as the water pressure in the water heater reaches 80 psi, it stays there. I looked up the toilet tank and saw a little water continuously dripped at the back of the filler valve. The amount is so little that there is no sound or even water ripple on the top. When the water pressure was relieved by opening up a faucet a little, the dripping on this filler valve stopped. This is great. It is an easy way to maintain the water pressure below 80 psi.

The installation is just as easy as any other modern filler valve. The only additional step is to hook up an additional chain to the flush lever, for the leak detection mechanism. I carefully wrapped the excess chain length so that it would not get tangled up. Cutting the excess off probably is a better way. I have done 15 to 20 flushes so far, and everything seems to work fine. I wish I knew this earlier before I changed out a couple of filler valves recently with Korky quiet fill. BTW, the water filling is very quiet for this valve too. If this lasts as long as the other filler valves, then I will use only this filler valve from now on.
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on March 4, 2015
I have four bathrooms. Two of them had quirky fill valves, and since I've upgraded to a larger water heater I was concerned about thermal expansion. This seemed like a good idea, but turned out to be the exact opposite. I purchased two of these and attempted to install the first one. I quickly found that it would not work . The fill arm hits the front of the tank if I install the unit "squared" with the walls of the tank. So, the obvious thing to do is to install it on an angle to provide more clearance for the fill arm to actuate. However, that is not possible because the "stub" for the pressure relief contacts the back of the tank.

Ok, time to pull back and regroup. I tried installing it in my other toilet that needed the fill valve replaced and encountered the same exact issue. Trying to think outside the box, I checked my other two toilets thinking I could install this (if it fit) and transfer the presently working fill valves to my other toilets where this device would not fit. No good, found the same clearance issues with my other two toilets.

Unless your toilet has a large tank OR the hole in the bottom of the tank is closer to the front of the tank than the rear, you will be unable to use this device. Three of my four toilets are original to the house (1985) and the fourth is 2010 vintage. This unit needs a redesign, plain and simple.

After wasting a bunch of time, I am heading to Lowes to purchase two more of the Korky QuietFill kits to install in place of these and I'll go with an expansion tank for my water heater instead.

They need to go back to the drawing board. Either shorten the fill arm or move the pressure relief to another location.
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on April 9, 2015
I bought this item because recently i noticed after i used hot water for awhile the hot water would heat up the t&p valve on the side of my water heater would start to drip a little, near the end of the heating cycle and would stop after awhile on its own or when i would flush the toilet or open a faucet or something. So after days of research online trying to figure out why it did that, i found out it was because when the water heats up it has no where to escape because of thermal expansion and because most homes now days have a backflow preventer installed by the water meter so that water cant go back into the city water and contaminate the city water. Anyways i started to notice this issues after i repaired leaky faucets and toilets which must of been where the pressure was escaping. Anyways i knew it was a good thing the t&p valve was doing its job but i also knew it wasnt good for it to keep doing it so i had the option of a expansion tank or this valve and this was cheaper and was something i knew i could install myself. i have only had this device for one day but i have ran my hot water many different times for 10 minutes or more at a time and i kept an eye on my t&p valve and after about 15 minutes of the water heater heating it appeared that the valve in the toilet was doing its job like it claims and letting the pressure out into my toilet tank bowl instead of releasing it from my t&p valve which was what i was hoping for. Anyways im not a plumber and this is a project any home owner can do just search this item on youtube and it will make installing this item easy.if you have a dripping t&p valve only after heating up water like i did i would recommend buying this to help protect your plumbing.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on June 4, 2013
This fill valve may have lots of great ideas but the execution is awful!

1. The float mechanism is much larger than other fill valves. It must be twisted and positioned exactly or it a) rubs against the side of the tank. b) it rubs against the fill tube. Both of these will cause the tank to not fill or ,even worse, continue to overfill because the valve does not shut off if the float doesn't raise. c) The additional fill lever protruding from the front (not used on any other fill valve) jams against the side of the tank or fill tube.

2. The fill valve uses a secondary fill arm to allow the water to be filled. It attaches with a chain (plastic) to the toilet handle lever. So now you've got 2 chains attached to the toilets handle. One from the stopper that drains the water, and one from this fill valve. The extra chain has been getting caught on the fill flapper. This jams the flapper open. I don't know how many gallons have been poured down the toilet because it continued to try to fill a tank with a jammed open flapper. My water bill this month will probably be $200 more than any other month due to this "water saving device"!

I do NOT recommend this product! Get ANY other basic fill valve. Any one would be better than this one.
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on March 6, 2015
It works nicely. I did not realized that the water pressure in my house constantly stays above 100 psi and gets up to 125 psi at nights. According to the code, water system pressure must not exceed 80 psi while release valve on water heater usually set at 150 psi. Result - two leaking water heaters in last ten years and serious flood in the finished basement last year. Plumber who installed new water heater also suggested to keep an eye on the water pressure in the house. I did and was terrified... The water company did not move a finger to fix excessive pressure regardless of the Code. So I installed pressure regulator and installed this Governor device with pressure release valve at 80 psi as a fallback in case the pressure regulator gives up. So far this setup works nicely. I've read complains the this Governor is noisy but it is not true in my case, probably, because it works in tandem with pressure regulator. This combination gives me peace of mind.
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