Waylaid Kindle Edition and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $12.95
  • Save: $1.29 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 8 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Waylaid has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Solid used copy with visible wear. FREE SHIPPING w/AMAZON PRIME!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Waylaid Paperback – May 2, 2002


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$11.66
$6.97 $4.48
Best%20Books%20of%202014
$11.66 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 8 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.


Frequently Bought Together

Waylaid + American Born Chinese
Price for both: $20.01

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 200 pages
  • Publisher: Kaya/Muae (May 2, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1885030320
  • ISBN-13: 978-1885030320
  • Product Dimensions: 6.9 x 4.4 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,148,021 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

*Starred Review* The unnamed narrator of Lin's brilliant debut is the 12-year-old son of Taiwanese immigrant parents who own a rundown motel on the New Jersey coast. Catering to impecunious old men in the winter, to higher-paying "Bennys" (stands for Bayonne, Elizabeth, Newark, and New York--these customers' hometowns) in the summer, and to hookers' johns year-round, it is no place to grow up in, but it is what his parents have chosen to succeed in, in America. The boy works the front desk and does chores whenever he isn't in school or asleep. Newly postpubescent, big for his age, and egged on by a friendly Benny ("Girls were all over me when I was like eight," he boasts), the boy makes getting laid his prime objective between Benny seasons. As he progresses toward his goal, Lin carefully reveals, through him, what making it in America can entail for even bright, ambitious newcomers. Awash in a sea of stupidity and venality, the boy, neither stupid nor venal, seems bent on more than hauling his ashes, and after his father suffers a stroke, and relatives come from Taiwan to keep the motel afloat, he looks like a prevailer, not just a survivor. Lin's unsentimental, purely realist--not naturalist, not socialist, not postmodernist--novel raises hopes that American fiction may yet grow up. Ray Olson
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

Review

Ed Lin. . .has the eye and wit of a pro....Waylaid will make you laugh and cringe. -- Playboy, October

The novel may work for fans of Suburban Bleak films like "Buffalo 66." -- San Francisco Chronicle, September 15, 2002

Waylaid is like a nihilistic -- but enjoyable -- detour on a journey from nothing to nowhere. -- Time Asia Magazine, September 16, 2002

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
11
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 13 customer reviews
Very well written.
Qtzion
America in the 70' and 80's suffered from a dilapidated post-vietnam depression that is captured very accurately here.
Thomas Willard
Despite its dreary theme, the book is endearingly funny, with snappy dialogue, and unexpected tragicomic scenes.
Louis N. Gruber

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Keyglow on June 13, 2002
Format: Paperback
An outstanding first novel!
In Waylaid, Ed Lin deftly navigates the delicate balance between the ire and angst of growing up Asian in a non Asian society with the beauty and poignancy of just growing up. His nameless protagonist begins a journey of self discovery that is as heartbreaking as it is hilarious, as honest as it is raw. Set in a "No tell Motel" on the Jersey shore, Lin's twelve year old main character finds himself (as we all have at some point in our lives) caught between the rock that is every American man's dream, and the hard place that is every American boy's fantasy. This is a wonderful novel whose universal message should be read and enjoyed by every American, Asian or no. Props to Ed Lin!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Louis N. Gruber VINE VOICE on March 29, 2003
Format: Paperback
The nameless narrator of this short novel is a twelve-year old Chinese-American boy who is struggling to grow up and finish school, while working in the decrepit seaside motel run by his parents. The motel is a dingy and depressing place, catering to transients and the down-and-out. Our narrator attends school and works at the motel and dreams of having his first sexual experience.
Not a novel of complex ideas but of sad and desperate yearnings. Things get worse when the young man's father has a stroke, and the little family is no longer able to maintain the business. What will happen to them now?
Despite its dreary theme, the book is endearingly funny, with snappy dialogue, and unexpected tragicomic scenes. It paints a searing picture of loneliness, struggle, and alientation--the American dream's dark side. It is well written and well worth reading. Reviewed by Louis N. Gruber
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Silka Greenfeld on July 28, 2002
Format: Paperback
This is a terrific first novel that hits all the great themes: struggle for identity, sexual discovery, and the tension between familial duty and rebellion. Waylaid is good, simple story telling that is steadily entertaining while also enlightening. Congratulations to Ed Lin, who I'd never heard of before but who I look forward to reading again. This book deserves more notice than it has received.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Jennifer Zwicker on August 2, 2003
Format: Paperback
I picked this book up at the library as I remembered seeing stuff that was on the cover before, I live in NJ too, as this book is set in NJ. I loved this book, it ranks right up there with Green Grass Grace by Shawn McBride. I read it all in 3 hours. Great book. A great read for a rainy afternoon or a hot day at the beach.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Yongsoo Park on September 28, 2004
Format: Paperback
WAYLAID does exactly that to readers. It takes them on a journey ostensibly to the gritty world of the Jersey Shore back in the 1980s but really to the mind of a 12-year-old Chinese American boy who's stuck manning the counter of his parents' fleabag motel.

To some, that description might sound depressing. But to others, it's the recipe for drama. And even to some 12-year-olds, a dream job.

Whatever the case, the book sucks you in into a world peopled by unforgettable characters. The strongest trait of the book, however, is by far the voice of the protagonist. It's a refreshing air of irreverence filled with longing that forces you to read on.

If you're into books about yuppie Asian American success stories or Asian American versions of chick-lit, complete with at least a dozen references to various Korean dishes, this book really isn't going to do it for you. But if you want to read a book that's real, WAYLAID is about as good a start as you can get.

This book is a book that I wish I could have written. It's genuine and it's got heart. And on top of everything, it has tons of laugh-out-loud moments that will delight you even in the face of the dark realities it depicts. It also helped me to write LAS CUCARACHAS, my second novel.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Qtzion on April 13, 2003
Format: Paperback
Great book! Very well written. The situations are depressing but the dialogue is so snappy and witty that the book is almost a quasi comedy. I love how it moves away from the typical Asian American immigrant story to something darker and is definitely more sexually explicit than most books in the same genre.
This book has universal appeal. It's not just an Asian American book nor a minority experience book. There's a part of the book that speaks to all of us.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Thomas Willard on February 18, 2005
Format: Paperback
This novel of a young Chinese American is a classic bildungsroman in the Bukowski "Ham on Rye" sense. America in the 70' and 80's suffered from a dilapidated post-vietnam depression that is captured very accurately here. You can see the paint rotting off the wood in Lin's world. His world is gritty, reminding me of the LA suburb that Bukowski describes and the contstant excess he was faced with as well. He is faced with prostitutes on a daily basis. Older men befriend him and treat him like an adult; only to fall to vice and the police later on. In some ways, this book is a mirror reflecting so many struggles people face in pulling themselves from the mediocrity or our childhood years.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?