Buy Used
$34.00
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: First Edition in U.K., First Printing. Hardcover. Condition: Very good minus (spine lettering rubbed, pages 51 & 53 have 2 short tears) with rather worn dust jacket (long tears repaired, owner name on flap; spine tanned--but front panel bright and flap-price is intact).
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Ways of Sunlight Hardcover – Import, January 1, 1957


See all 17 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover, Import
"Please retry"
$17.59
Best%20Books%20of%202014

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 188 pages
  • Publisher: St. Martins Press; First American Edition edition (January 1, 1957)
  • ASIN: B0000CJW5D
  • Product Dimensions: 7.2 x 5 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #8,946,740 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
10
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
1
See all 13 customer reviews
Great book, and I recommend to read this book if you have been to the Island.
Gary Selz
It captures the true multi ethnic fabric of Trinidadian society through the trials of an Indian boy struggling to make it in early 20th century Trinidad.
Mango Juice
The book sets itself up for comparison between the two locations, London and Trinidad, and between the creole and the immigrant experiences.
J.G. Nugent

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 23, 1998
Format: Paperback
A touching portrait of a community surrounded by dramatic events, and two young people forced into marriage trying to find the ways of adulthood. A well thought out book, with gentle humor and deep tales of anguish.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Mango Juice on February 16, 2003
Format: Paperback
This book is absolutely brilliant. It captures the true multi ethnic fabric of Trinidadian society through the trials of an Indian boy struggling to make it in early 20th century Trinidad. This book brings to light many ethnic and cultural issues that are a now inherent part of Trinidadian life, and is not only a brilliant piece of literature that should be cherished, but a piece of Caribbean history.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By T. Thomas on January 8, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I bought this book because I never had a chance to read when I was in school in Trinidad. I must say, for a first novel, the writer did an amazing job of painting pictures with words. Because it was written in a time before me, I learned something about the history of the island and also about the East Indian culture. A great read. I was so pleased that I bought two more books by the author.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By J. Geoffrey Nugent on February 5, 2002
Format: Paperback
It is a pity that this book is no longer in print. I was first exposed to it when I taught it as part of the CXC curriculum in Barbados in the mid-80s. It is a delightful sequence of short stories arranged in two parts - Trinidad and London. Some stories are in dialect, others are in 'Queen's English' but for dialogue. The stories, though set in the 1950s, are universal in appeal, as witnessed by the fact that I have taught them to high school classes in British Columbia, New Brunswick, and now Ontario. The opening story, "Johnson and the Cascadura", and the final story, "My Girl and the City", are equal to any short story written anywhere by anyone. The latter story, being a stream-of-consciousness type, is far more accessible for high-school students than James Joyce! If you can get your hands on a copy of this short-story compilation, I don't think you will regret the effort or money expended!
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By J.G. Nugent on March 9, 2004
Format: Paperback
I first read this book when I began teaching at a boy's school in Barbados 20 years ago, and I have ordered or taught excerpts of it to my classes in three other schools over the years. The book sets itself up for comparison between the two locations, London and Trinidad, and between the creole and the immigrant experiences. The stories range from the longer "Johnson and the Cascadura", which Selvon would expand into the later novel "Those Who Eat the Cascadura", to the stream-of-consciousness piece which ends the collection, "My Girl and the City", a style he would further explore in "The Lonely Londoners". Read separately or collectively, this is a delightful book of short stories that captures moments in time and for all time.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By J. Geoffrey Nugent on February 5, 2002
Format: Paperback
It is a shame that this book is no longer in print. I first taught it in Barbados where it was part of the CXC curriculum, but I have been able to teach selected short stories from it to high school students in British Columbia, New Brunswick, and now Ontario. There are particular stories, such as the first - "Johnson and the Cascadura" and the last - "My Girl and the City" which stand against any short story, anywhere. The latter story is a stream-of-consciousness piece which is accessible for adolescent readers (far more than Joyce!). The collection is divided into two parts - Trinidad and London. If you can get a copy of this book, and are interested in the Caribbean experience, you will not be disappointed with your purchase.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
Just a word of warning to those who may be reading the reviews to get a gist of the book: this book is a collection of short stories. Some reviewers are becoming confused with A Brighter Sun which documents the life of Tiger, a teenage Indo Trinidadian boy and his wife by arranged marriage, Urmilla, who is also a teen. Ways of Sunlight does not have.stories featuring Tiger and Urmilla. However it does have the short story Johnson and the Cascadura, which is sad touching and hopeful. I personally enjoyed the Village Washer. There was another where the Trinis in revenge 'wuk' obeah on the apartment building of an unfair landlord. That was the first time I ever heard of incoming the.vengeance of Moko, lol.
Great read overall!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?