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We Are All Weird: The Myth of Mass and the End of Compliance Audible – Unabridged

4 out of 5 stars 143 customer reviews

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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I've been a follower of Seth Godin for a while now--I read his blog daily, and have read a majority of his books. I think that was actually a bad thing relating to my enjoyment of "We're all Weird". Too many of the ideas were pointlessly longer recapitulations of Godin's previous messages, from both his blog and his books, and the general message about the fall of mass and the rise of individuality (weirdness) seemed trite. Less ardent fans of Godin might find the book refreshingly insightful, but those familiar with his writing likely won't find anything new.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I like most of Seth Godin's ideas, including this one, but to what end is the purpose of this 100 page book that, I believe, would have been suited for a short article or blog post.?

We are all weird, is self-evident in a day when we can choose between a couple of hundred pasta sauces in the supermarket. If you want to buy and learn how to play the ukulele, you will be sure to find like minded people online. The market is no longer of limited choice dictated by others.

Today, you can do, buy, sell, and associate with anyone you want, as long as it is legal, and it's as easy as ever to find it. That pretty much sums it up.

Seth Godin is still an amazing person to listen to and take advice from. I think Seth Godin's book, " Poke the Box" deserves 5 stars.
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Format: Hardcover
Seth Godin's latest is a little book with big ideas about how to live your life. For marketers and business owners, it is also a wakeup call for how to reach buyers of your products and services.

Seth argues that the one-size-fits-all mass market is dead. But you know that already because you probably don't listen to top 40 radio or watch the evening news. This idea of the end of "normal" is essential to work because if you're selling ads at a top 40 station, work probably isn't much fun these days. Embrace the weird and it can be!

I love this quote from the book: "The epic battle of our generation is between the status quo of mass and the never-ceasing tide of weird."

Weirdness takes many forms. When everyone else is carrying nylon computer bags and sporty backpacks, weird people insist on an "old-fashioned" leather briefcase (guilty). Many people think it is weird to go to over 50 Grateful Dead concerts and own recordings of hundreds of their concerts (also guilty).

Is it weird to spend six hours on a beautiful Saturday afternoon in a dingy rec room playing Dungeons and Dragons? To collect chewing gum wrappers and own over 2,000, with examples from over 50 countries? To read instead of watching television? To ride a bike instead of driving?

The weird is us. And the weird is you. (What would they think if they knew?!).

In other words, weirdness is a huge market. I'd argue that unless you sell a commodity product - like paperclips - that you need to embrace the weird buyer in your marketing efforts. Heck, there are animal shaped paperclips and colored paperclips and huge paperclips so even commodities can be marketed to the weird.

Mass = Normal. Weird = Rich.

You can read "We Are All Weird" in an hour.
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Format: Kindle Edition
This was thankfully a short read because there just wasn't much for Seth to talk about. I'm a huge fan of some of his previous works, and I consider 'The Dip' to be one of my favorite business reads, but compare both short books and you'll see what a giant gap it is. If you're interested in this topic, I'd recommend you read the Long Tail by Chris Anderson instead which has a much more insightful and indepth coverage of this subject matter.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Seth Godin became famous as a marketing guru, but I think his real value lies elsewhere. Lots of people say the same stuff he does about marketing. His real talent, IMO, is his ability to distill trends and marketing know-how into inspiring manifestos.

About three years ago, Godin's Linchpin completely changed how I thought about my career and the business I'm in. We Are All Weird takes the core ideas from Linchpin and applies them in a marketing context. However, this is more than a marketing book. It is very purposefully meant to change how the reader looks at the world.

The Good:

-Weird>Normal

Seth Godin's premise is simple. When people have an opportunity to make choices, they tend to want to express themselves. At no other point in history have we had so much opportunity to do both. We have nearly unlimited choices on who we want to be and what we buy. No matter how we may want to express ourselves, there are others like us to whom we can instantly connect. As a result, we are increasingly unsatisfied with one-size-fits-all goods, services, and lifestyles. Companies and organizations that thrive on normal are finding it very difficult to eek out the steady results they used to.

Godin discusses how "normal" mass markets were a creation of mass production and mass communication. Brands profited from defining the normal and making sure everyone wanted that. Governments and religions enforced normal to ensure a well-educated and independent populace was controllable. It came down to efficiency and productivity.

But then, something started to happen. We got so good at normal it allowed us to be weird. Increases in efficiency and productivity lifted everyone's standard of living.
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