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We Are Smarter Than Me: How to Unleash the Power of Crowds in Your Business Hardcover – October 5, 2007


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Wharton School Publishing; 1 edition (October 5, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0132244799
  • ISBN-13: 978-0132244794
  • Product Dimensions: 0.7 x 5.4 x 9.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,290,228 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Best Books of 2007, Top 10 Editors Pick: Business" - Amazon.com, 2007

  

#1 on 800-CEO-READ's "Top 25 Monthly" Bestseller List, August 2008

 

"10 Books to Inspire Your Business for 2008", The Street.com, November 15, 2007

 

 

From the Back Cover

Wikinomics and The Wisdom of Crowds identified the phenomena of emerging social networks, but they do not confront how businesses can profit from the wisdom of crowds. WE ARE SMARTER THAN ME by Barry Libert and Jon Spector, Foreword by Wikinomics author Don Tapscott, is the first book to show anyone in business how to profit from the wisdom of crowds. Drawing on their own research and the insights from an enormous community of more than 4,000 people, Barry Libert and Jon Spector have written a book that reveals what works, and what doesn't, when you are building community into your decision making and business processes. In We Are Smarter Than Me, you will discover exactly how to use social networking and community in your business, driving better decision-making and greater profitability. The book shares powerful insights and new case studies from product development, manufacturing, marketing, customer service, finance, management, and beyond. You'll learn which business functions can best be accomplished or supported by communities; how to provide effective moderation, balance structure with independence, manage risk, define success, implement effective metrics, and much more. From tools and processes to culture and leadership, We Are Smarter than Me will help you transform the promise of social networking into a profitable reality.


More About the Author

Barry Libert is a board member, social, mobile and big data technology investor, and strategic advisor to boards and their leaders seeking to create value using today's technologies. His portfolio companies (past and present) manage more than 15,000 corporate social networks (customer and employee), 350,000 experts, and 2 billion monthly interactions. He has also advised companies such as Microsoft, GE Healthcare, SunLife, Deloitte, ESPN and the US Army on how to use social and mobile technologies to drive growth and innovation.

Barry has authored five (5) books and more than a dozen (15) e-books on the value of digital technologies impact of organizations. He has co-authored more than 1100 articles that have appeared in the WSJ, Barrons, Businessweek, NYT, Institutional Investor, Financial Times and other leading periodicals. He has also been on CNBC, CNN and Bloomberg TV. He has spoken at over 400 events to more than 30,000 people.

He is graduate of Tufts (BA) and Columbia Universities (MBA). He is happily married with two grown sons he adores.



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Customer Reviews

This book is an example of its own subject.
Rolf Dobelli
I was interested in the book "We Are Smarter than Me", and from the primary hardcover book page, followed the link to the Kindle title.
kristi
This book will save you reading lots of other books and doing your own research . . . if you read it right away.
Donald Mitchell

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Colin E. Manning on January 16, 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
It's disturbing what passes for a book these days. This book is a disjointed collection of quotes, lists, and sundry clipart.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Thomas Duff HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on November 9, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Are you getting those "what's this Web 2.0 stuff" questions at work? Does the boss want to know why s/he should be considering how social networking can help the business? Barry Libert and Jon Spector can answer some of those questions in the book We Are Smarter Than Me: How to Unleash the Power of Crowds in Your Business. It's a bit "rah rah" in nature, and it actually failed in its initial goal. But this small volume should be more than enough to get your management thinking in the right direction...

Contents:
How We Got Here; Look What We Can Do; Go from R&D to R&WE; How May We Help We?; Customer, Sell Thyself; If We Build It, We Will Come; Welcome to the World Bank of We; Make Everyone a C-We-O; Lead from the Rear; Afterword - Join the Crowd; Company Index; Name Index; Subject Index; Acknowledgments

The general idea in We is that no one single person or organization can have all the right answers. It's only as you invite others into the conversation that you will make dramatic leaps in customer involvement and ownership. These invitations often show up these days in web sites using tools such as discussion forums, community volunteer help desks, wikis, etc. The "crowds" know more than you do, and they are often quite willing to be part of your success if you'll let them. Take Amazon.com for example... a huge differentiator is their customer review feature (of which this review will be part of as soon as I'm done). Why do people contribute their time and effort on reviews of items when it only serves to help Amazon sell more? Because people are passionate about what they like and dislike, and they want their voice to be heard. This "wisdom of the crowds" enables others to get a more complete view of a product, and that ability drives traffic and sales.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Wayne Turmel on November 3, 2007
Format: Hardcover
.. so it's good to know that there are many ways to capture the wisdom of audiences, co-workers and strangers who share a passion for whatever it is I'm doing. I'll take all the help I can get. In "We Are Smarter Than Me", Barry Libert and Jon Spector have put together a book that is both a primer in using social networks for businesses and individuals, and a prime example of what can be created by using them effectively.

While true "Web 2.0" geeks might find some of the examples a bit basic, most business people and civilians will be fascinated at how many examples fit their needs, and might even find the competition is ahead of them.

You can hear an interview with Barry Libert on The Cranky Middle Manager Show at [...]
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Dr. L. A. Plugge on January 6, 2008
Format: Hardcover
The book turns out to be more like a pamphlet: superficial, one/few liners.
It would be nice as a presentation, but as a book it is too pretentious.
However, it does provide a convenient list of ideas to "unleash the power of crowdsourcing"
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Format: Hardcover
Slightly less than a decade ago, the Internet bubble was in full expansion, where even absurd ideas were given economic credence and assigned paper values of millions of dollars. Many believed that the Internet would revolutionize business. While that has taken place, albeit with a major bursting of the bubble of absurd expectations, the real revolution has been in social interaction. Sites such as Facebook and MySpace allow people from all over the world to socially interact. If you are around teenagers, you understand the depth of the phenomenon. Furthermore, you also realize how second nature such communication is to them.
The primary authors of this book have used that capability to develop it. By soliciting online contributions, they have received feedback and contributions from many people. Those messages have been incorporated into the book in a self-referential manner. For the subject matter is how businesses can use the social networking aspects of the Internet to improve their business practice.
For a few businesses, such interacts are critical to success; however for most, this use of the Internet would only supplement and improve their current business practices. There are many ways in which this can and has been done and the authors point out several success stories. They range from very small business to such corporate powerhouses as Procter & Gamble and Amazon.com. While they are generally on target, I have to disagree somewhat with one conclusion. On page 144, there is the statement, "Indeed, we believe that the corporation as it now exists, with its armies of salaried workers in identical cubicles will gradually disappear." While this is likely true for companies whose capital is knowledge, this will not happen for companies dealing in commodities.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Craig L. Howe on October 27, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Drawing on their social networking ideas and research, authors Barry Libert and Jon Spector drew upon more than 4,000 people to help write a book on how to make money from the wisdom of crowds.

Writing a book is hard enough, but coordinating the contributions of thousands must be a massive effort. Surprisingly the resulting effort is readable and insightful. The primary and secondary authors argue adapting social network to your business will drive decision-making and greater profitability.

The book shares case studies on product development, manufacturing, marketing, customer service, finance and management. After completing it, I had greater insights into business functions that can best be supported by social networks and communities; moderating the process, balancing structure with independence. I particularly enjoyed the authors' thoughts on managing risk and effective metrics.

I loved James Surowiecki's The Wisdom of Crowds and still highly recommend it. This book takes the next logical step. If social collaboration is going to infiltrate our personal and professional lives, there will have to be profit in it.
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