Customer Reviews


7 Reviews
5 star:
 (4)
4 star:
 (2)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An eye-opener as to what corporations are doing
Privatizing public water for commodification, draining underground water sources faster than they can recharge, manipulating plant DNA and "patenting food," CAFOs and the absolutely inhumane treatment of animals.... There are many good DVDs on these topics, and this is one of the better ones. Not just addressing the issues, but naming names, graphic representation of...
Published on November 17, 2009 by L. Collier

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars A Modest Helping
After watching about 5 food documentaries, they all seem to blend together. Now that's not necessarily a bad thing as it will help reinforce concepts that you may not have fully grasped the first time. I was surprised that this film actually was able to give me more insight and facts on corporate farming worldwide. This film gave you more of a European perspective and...
Published 16 months ago by Rodney Varfley


Most Helpful First | Newest First

22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An eye-opener as to what corporations are doing, November 17, 2009
By 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: We Feed the World (DVD)
Privatizing public water for commodification, draining underground water sources faster than they can recharge, manipulating plant DNA and "patenting food," CAFOs and the absolutely inhumane treatment of animals.... There are many good DVDs on these topics, and this is one of the better ones. Not just addressing the issues, but naming names, graphic representation of tremendous waste, and out-there discussion on how these practices are affecting us, how these practices affect our environment, which then affects us...the vicious cycle. It all comes down to money. Bigger profits for the greedy corporation who exploit people, the environment, loopholes in the law, and how they are able to influence those in power--as well as disregarding and overturning legal policy in seemingly overnight maneuvers--for their own selfish gains.

I have watched many DVDs on the issues of food and water. The best ones seem to be coming from outside the U.S. This does not surprise me given the immense political clout and pressure these companies wield, and our government allows, with their mighty financial swords and legal wranglings. The best U.S. productions have been "Food, Inc," and "King Corn" (the latter is a bit hokey, but it gets better as the movie progresses). Other than that, "We Feed the World," "Our Daily Bread," and "FLOW: For Love of Water" have been the best. (I think the latter is Canadian). Combine them, and you have some overlap, but a very comprehensive view of things. I was a cautious label reader before, but these DVDs (and a few books) have made me rethink, and change, many purchases. To be truly "PC" and "MC" (morally correct), avoid GMOs, bypass environmentally destructive companies, as well as purchasing only those foods that are nourishing, unadulterated, and organic will take quite a bit of research on my part, and additional work to combine the results, and I have no doubt I will end up with a very, very short list from which to shop. Slim pickings indeed, but it is a task well worth undertaking.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


26 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Where we are & Where we're going, May 28, 2009
This review is from: We Feed the World (DVD)
We Feed The World is an excellent documentary that shows us the current state of food production from the points of view of the farmers (in both industrialized countries and developing countries), small scale fishermen, the food distributors, the consumers, farm animals, and the multinational food production corporations. The current situation is insane.

We currently have some very undesirable situations with people starving all over the world and GM (genetically modified) crops quickly replacing natural ones on farms the world over. We are eliminating natural crops that taste better and may be better for us than the GM ones. One of the film's speakers, a representative from a multinational seed company, says that future generations of people may not ever know what a real tomato tastes like. Why on earth do food distributors find it necessary to truck tomatoes some 2,500 km across Europe? Why do we punish farmers in developing countries by dumping our excess produce on their markets cheaper than they can produce it themselves?

It seems like the only winners are the big multinational food corporations like Nestle Foods, whose president makes a speech at the end of the film saying that times have never been better. People have never had so much money. This is a great dvd to add to your collection if you would like a good overview about where we are and where we're going with regards to food production, distribution and consumption.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


12 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thought Provoking, Excellent Documentary, August 22, 2009
This review is from: We Feed the World (DVD)
This is one of the most thought provoking films I have seen in a very long time. We Feed the World actually presents a fairly balanced view of the food situation in the world. The balance comes in the last 15 minutes with a very frank direct interview with the former CEO of Nestle, Peter Brabeck. I actually haven't felt compelled to take notes during a film in a very long time. The film is very very European, taking a stong EU view of the world; the US is mostly left out of the conversation.

The DVD menu is perfectly organized - each menu selection could be a good solid one hour discussion about the pros and cons of what was presented. Whether in a classroom or home, this is a film to discuss.

The film tours through wheat farming in Switzerland, a small fisherman in Brittany France, greenhouse tomatoes in Spain, hybrid seeds in Romania, soybeans in Brazil, chickens in Austria, and finally Nestle. Each topic is discussed in around 15 minute segments. There is an interview with a UN reporter on World Hunger that anchors each segment. A lot of statistics or facts are stated. It seems the desired effect is, oh my that is horrible, we should do something about that. However, there is usually a counterpoint when I considered these facts in more depth.

The film is beautifully shot, with excellent pacing. The dialog is well recorded, and there are some really wonderful background outdoor sounds - bugs, birds, and wind blowing through a wheat field. They all lead to an easy to watch film.

The film is not rated, just be warned that at 1:20, there is some pretty graphic views of chickens going to slaughter and just after their throats are cut - it is pretty graphic making you feel like becoming a vegetarian. Sadly, its just a fact of life if we are to eat meat. There is also a double f bomb tossed out by the Pioneer Seed person. The words are said without emotion or emphasis, and said by somebody with a very strong accent - my point, most people won't even hear the words. Otherwise, this is an important film the whole family should view.

I really loved the debate this film set up in my mind. On the one hand, we would all love organically grown heirloom vegetables to go with our free range chicken. But on the other, the world has to be fed, and there just isn't enough space, money or time to feed everyone in exactly that manner. At some point we have to realize, industrial food manufacture is one way huge masses of people can eat. It is better though, to eat what is grown locally whenever possible. Its so worth listening to this debate, discuss the ideas presented in the film. They are not simple black and white issues.

View the film. Ponder the information, do a little research. Discuss what it means. And draw your own conclusions.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars You will never think of throwing bread away again, July 7, 2008
By 
I saw this movie in a theater in Paris. It is a very powerful documentary on how agribusiness has highkacked and distorted the food we eat and privatized the water we drink and how all this is a huge waste of ressources and energy. The scenes with the discarded bread in Vienna, the vegetables being grown on no soil in the South of Spain or the CEO of Nestle speaking his heart about pay per drink water are unforgettable.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars A Modest Helping, April 21, 2013
By 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: We Feed the World (DVD)
After watching about 5 food documentaries, they all seem to blend together. Now that's not necessarily a bad thing as it will help reinforce concepts that you may not have fully grasped the first time. I was surprised that this film actually was able to give me more insight and facts on corporate farming worldwide. This film gave you more of a European perspective and how small, old-world style, food producers are disadvantaged because of widespread corporate activity.

It takes a nice honest and calm (not fuel for idle protesters looking for a cause) look at the cons of mega-producers in the global food landscape

The facts are good but the editing seems too slow at times, and the film quality doesn't compare to the artwork on the case (i know, it's just a baby chick on a yellow background but still). Good stuff learned and not a waste of money.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars A well made documentary., April 1, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: We Feed the World (DVD)
An eye opener about where our food comes, how it's processed, and the darker side of cheap and abundant food.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars WE EAT WHAT """THEY PRODUCE"""., August 18, 2010
By 
Rita Maceroni (Cocoa Beach, FL USA) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: We Feed the World (DVD)
IT ITS INCREDIBLE THAT WE ALL ARE GOING TO DIE SOME DAY EATING ALL THE PRODUCTS THAT THIS BIGGGGGGGG COMPANIES ARE DISTRIBUTING TO US.
THERE IS NOTHING WE CAN DO. THEY ARE TO BIG TO FIGHT WITH THEM. THEY OWN EVERYBODY. OUR ONLY HOPE IS THAT ALL THIS GENETIC CHANGES DON'T END UP CAUSING SOME KIND OF SICKNESS TO THE WHOLE WORLD; BECAUSE THEIR FOOD IS BEEN EATING BY THE WHOLE WORLD POPULATION.
THE ONLY WAY IS TRYING TO EAT ""NON GENETICALLY MODIFIED FOOD"" WHICH IS COSTLY AND SOME TIMES IMPOSSIBLY TO FIND.
I WILL RECOMMEND OTHER FILMS LIKE ""BAD SEED"", ""KING CORN "", ""BLUE GOLD""(WORLD WATER WARS).
GOOD LUCK EATING ALL THE ""GM"" CORN.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

We Feed the World
We Feed the World by Erwin Wagenhofer (DVD - 2013)
$29.95 $22.28
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Search these reviews only
Rate and Discover Movies
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.