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We Live In Public, Collector's Edition

23 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Product Description

Ten years in the making and culled from 5000 hours of footage, We Live In Public reveals the effect the web is having on our society, as seen through the eyes of "the greatest Internet pioneer you've never heard of,? artist, futurist and visionary Josh Harris. Award-winning director Ondi Timoner documented Josh's tumultuous life for more than a decade to create a riveting, cautionary tale of what to expect as the virtual world inevitably takes control of our lives. Through his experiments, including a six-month stint living with his girlfriend under 24-hour electronic surveillance which led to his mental collapse, Harris demonstrates the price we pay for living in public. Lots of extras included as well.

Review

This is a remarkable film about a strange and prophetic man. --Roger Ebert, Chicago Sun-Times

Bone-chilling...Darkly funny...Astounding... --Variety

Riveting - a compelling, cautionary tale. --New York Times

Special Features

None.

Product Details

  • Actors: Josh Harris, Tom Harris
  • Directors: Ondi Timoner
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Collector's Edition, Color, Dolby, NTSC, Widescreen
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 2
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: IndiePix Films
  • DVD Release Date: July 19, 2011
  • Run Time: 90 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B003VSL58O
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #568,169 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Jamison "Cold-Cuts" Plush on March 16, 2010
Format: DVD
This is perhaps the most relevant movie I have ever seen on the subject of modern society and the internet. That's an understatement. I wondered at some points if this was a mockumentary, since the claims were unbeleivable, and I'd never even heard of Media-God Josh Harris or his insane experiments. Its not. This man is a founding father of our internet age, for better or worse. His accomplishments and failures will haunt our society forever. When our private lives completely vanish into the public eye, when our most intimate of moments are broadcast willingly, when the sky can see us and becomes a grid of corporate properties, I will look back into the camera and think of one name. Not Big Brother. Josh Harris. This is a baffling, exciting, and disturbing film. Relevant. 5 Stars.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Z. Freeman VINE VOICE on April 22, 2010
Format: DVD
"People are willing to do stupid and dangerous and horrible things in exchange for fame," says journalist Gabriel Snyder, in acclaimed director Ondi Timoner's newest documentary We Live In Public, "and Josh is driven by that quest more than most people I know." The Josh Snyder is speaking of is Josh Harris, the unconventional visionary at the center of We Live in Public and the "stupid and dangerous and horrible things" he is speaking of are well explored in Timoner's explosive and nearly unbelievable film recounting Harris' various exploits in the late '90s and early '00s - the kinds of exploits that only the remarkably rich can engage in. And thanks to his vision and keen foresight at the dawn of the internet, Josh Harris was remarkably rich at the turn of the century.

At the center of Timoner's film, which is more or less a biography on the life and times of an idiosyncratic entrepreneur (Harris), are two bold experiments examining what the increasing role of technology in our lives does to our privacy and our personal lives. In the first, a bizarre projected dubbed "Quiet," Harris spends upwards of $2 million to house 100 people in an underground bunker in New York City for the last 30 days leading up to the turn of the century. Now, housing 100 people in a bunker doesn't sound all that bizarre, but the truly ground breaking part of the project is that the 100 participants were being filmed at all times (eating, sleeping, showering, and even in the bathroom). Each bed (or "pod" as they are called) is equipped with a display monitor and a video camera so that at any time any other person can watch and communicate with you on your "channel." Still, this doesn't sound that bizarre, right?
Read more ›
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By mumzonline on March 9, 2010
Format: DVD
I watched this last night, not really knowing what to expect. It starts out with Josh Harris recording his final goodbye, which he intends to send to his dying Mother whom he does not wish to see again. The way it starts is the way it continues. It is a jaw dropping, eye popping, 15 year documentary of Josh Harris. I had never heard of him before. We learn that he envisioned the virtual world we live in today. He orchestrated different social experiments, one where 100 people lived together in a "Big Brother" style environment for 30 days, and another that included living with his girlfriend with cameras filming everything including a potty camera. Josh Harris at one time was worth 80 million dollars, over time he reduced it to nothing. "We Live in Public" to me was like watching an alcoholic conducting an alcohol experiment, Josh Harris has absolutely no Social Skills, yet he conducted and participated in Social Experimentation. I believe that Josh Harris is just like his Mother, incapable of love and empathy and is as much a victim of his upbringing as he would likely today be diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome. Overall "We Live in Public" is a fascinating look back at the internet and it may well give you pause as we contemplate the future.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Robert Taylor Brewer on July 1, 2011
Format: DVD
We Live In Public

If one day, dear reader, you wake up and after tea, coffee or whatever breakfast nutrition takes your fancy, you suddenly experience a deep and abiding desire to plumb the worst excesses of the dot com craze, including the subsequent crash and burn that cut the market value of the Nasdaq in half from a level it hasn't even begun to approach in the years since the Spring of 2000, and if along with this sudden urge to revisit the destruction of enterprise value, you also have a hankering to see the corresponding human wasteland and the complete and utter debasement of individual self worth that money can be induced to create, well then friend, you are indeed in luck and We Live In Public is precisely the film for your viewing pleasure.

In glorious and living color, this film will show you the self abuse and degradation highly talented individuals who should have known better willingly subjected themselves to in the belief (misguided as things turned out) that the Internet is one big friendly global village that can provide for our every need, want and whimper for the amazingly low price of nothing down and nothing to pay. Ever. The leader and chief flutist of this Scheherazade was a man named Josh Harris who convinced his deluded minions that "Everything is free, except the video we make of you. That we own." To their enduring chagrin, they discovered that everything wasn't free, that psychic and emotional scars remain even after the cameras stopped rolling.

Strangely, the filmmakers interviewed no one from the New York City police department, the Mayor's office, or the leading press organs. There is a snippet of tape from a New York Times journalist, other than that, the film consists of sound bites from a coterie of Mr. Harris' family, friends, and former inmates at his asylum who still believe they were involved in something wonderful and precious.

Precious. Now that's a film worth seeing.
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