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We March Hardcover – January 3, 2012


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 4 - 8 years
  • Grade Level: Preschool - 3
  • Hardcover: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Roaring Brook Press (January 3, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1596435399
  • ISBN-13: 978-1596435391
  • Product Dimensions: 8.8 x 0.4 x 10.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #201,036 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

As he did in Underground (2011), Evans distills a critical moment in the fight for racial equality—the 1963 March on Washington—into tight, evocative prose, well calibrated for a very young audience. A boy, a girl, and their parents wake at dawn, prepare, travel, and join a march “to justice, to freedom, to our dreams.” The text itself, but 57 words, tells the story in a clear first-person-plural voice that begins with the young family and soon encompasses the entire assembly. The simplicity of the narrative is matched by Evans’ square, substantial, sunlit paintings, which—with wheelchairs, yarmulkes, and all manner of skin tone—are especially inclusive. The illustrations also depict recognizable faces (Mathew Ahmann, Floyd McKissick, Martin Luther King Jr., and Cleveland Robinson) and iconic landmarks on the National Mall, and conclude with Dr. King delivering the “I Have a Dream” speech with the words “Free at last!” This makes a pivotal event in our nation’s history accessible to our youngest citizens without compromising any of its power. An afterword concludes. Preschool-Grade 1. --Thom Barthelmess

Review

“… [a] well-told and superbly rendered book.”--School Library Journal, STARRED
 
“This makes a pivotal event in our nation’s history accessible to our youngest citizens without compromising any of its power.”--Booklist
 
“…there’s an iconic flavor to the scenes, their streamlined compositions and simplified human figures standing in for the experience of many…”--BCCB
 
"Share with readers of all ages as a beautiful message about peaceful protest and purposeful action."--Kirkus Reviews, Starred
 
"Many young children know there was a march on Washington a long time ago and that Martin Luther King Jr. gave a famous speech that day. Some know why the march took place; fewer still know how it happened. Using a minimalist text (no more than ten words per page) as he employed in Underground, Evans covers the last two points." --Horn Book Magazine 
 
“A moving introduction to a historic day.” --Publishers Weekly

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By aa-Pam TOP 500 REVIEWER on January 5, 2014
Format: Hardcover
I'm amazed that I can be moved by a practice reader for first graders. But with just 32 pages and 61 words, Shane Evans has managed to capture the 1963 March on Washington DC.

The art work is colorful and kid-friendly. And more than that, it's evocative. There are little things that he adds to the pictures that bring 'the moments' to life.

For example, there's the family rising up early to get started. The children are sleepy. They'd obviously rather stay in bed. But it's also clear that what this family is doing is more important than their being inconvenienced.

One other example of what I like about this book is that it shows a variety of people involved in this walk. Not just Martin Luther King, Jr. But regular people, be they white, black, brown, old, young, Christian, Jewish, male, female, or in a wheelchair. And this diversity allows adults to explain that this was only the beginning of recent struggles for equality. That at first it was about race. But that just opened the door for women, and the handicapped....

Lovely book to share. Like I said, it's at the first grade reading level, but it could surely be enjoyed by a wider age range.

(sample pages can be found on my website shld you care to track it down)
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By LizP on September 1, 2012
Format: Hardcover
In August of 1963 250,000 marched on Washington to protest the unjust treatment of blacks in the United States. It was at the rally following the March that Martin Luther King, Jr. gave his "I Have A Dream" speech.

The book follows a boy and a girl and their parents as they rise early, go to church to pray and make protest signs, take buses to Washington DC and march together, then stand with each other in a crowd of people and listen to a man talking about dreams.

The spare text and rich, simple drawings capture the excitement of the day without ever making clear that this day is the March on Washington. In fact, a child who has not yet learned about the March on Washington from his or her parents or teachers will be drawn in by the excitement, and they will begin to understand the meaning of the day.

There's a discussion of the day and its significance on the last page. This seems to be meant for parents and teachers rather than for the kids who are reading the book.

"We March" captures the power of people working together with a only few words and a few pictures.
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Format: Hardcover
I thought about waiting until August 28th to read this to my son (age 3) so I could tell him EXACTLY 51 years ago, this historic march for equality took place; but I was excited to take a look at it. It's very accessible to youngsters with wonderful illustrations and limited but meaningful text. Some historical picture books can be a bit factually overwhelming (read: boring), but this one explained the march from the viewpoint of two children marching with their parents. It's a great jumping off point for explaining that place in our history, but you need to be prepared to handle questions the story doesn't address - which are many. (There is a helpful post script at the end of the book which is probably more for the adult than the child.)

I explained to my son that not so long ago people were not allowed to do certain things because of the color of the skin. These are things he's familiar with and fond of: shopping, eating at restaurants, and even voting (he always comes with us to vote). Since we are a mixed race family, he has a vested interest in knowing mommy is treated just as well as daddy (and vice versa) and that no one will stop him from buying comic books or voting (he's already told us he will vote "when I am 16"). He understood the story well enough to ask the inevitable: "Do people still not like other people because of the color of their skin?"

Also, somehow: "Is God in our city?"

It's another great book to help begin another important conversation with your youngster.
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Format: Hardcover
Using just a sentence per page, this book gives a young African-American child's point of view of the 1963 March on Washington. What an absolutely empowering celebration of our First Amendment rights! The book employs painterly collage-style illustrations, and ends with a striking silhouette of Martin Luther King, Jr. There's also a postscript by the author with historical information.
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Format: Hardcover
Lovely clear ill. that can be seen easily by a group of children at a story time setting. The simple text and font are also easy for a leader to read even upside down while showing the pics to the group. While it doesn't go into much detail about MLK's "I have a dream speach", it does close on an image of him speaking allowing for a teacher to use it as a jumping off spot. Because it doesn't spend alot of time on the issues, it is not only good for Black History Month and MLK day but a good way to discuss any protest movement as a child will experience it (i.e. tired after a long day of marching).
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