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We Seven: By the Astronauts Themselves Paperback – Bargain Price, January 12, 2010


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Paperback, Bargain Price, January 12, 2010
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster (January 12, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1439181039
  • ISBN-13: 978-1439181034
  • ASIN: B004J8HXDG
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.2 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,634,166 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Cut of the same stone as Columbus, Magellan, Daniel Boone, Orville and Wilbur Wright...the seven astronauts of Project Mercury were winnowed out by the most searching tests man could devise and machine could execute." -- Time

About the Author

As part of the Mercury Seven, M. Scott Carpenter became one of America's first astronauts. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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See all 18 customer reviews
It was a time of great unknowns.
Thomas Erickson
It was standing a long time untouched on my bookshelf but one day I took it out and started reading it.
Ulrich
As an avid follower of the American space program, I devoured this book when I was young.
Charles Ashbacher

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 22 people found the following review helpful By wogan TOP 100 REVIEWER on January 29, 2010
Format: Paperback
`We Seven' is a period piece. It was first published in 1962 and has been relatively hard to find for several years except as a used book. My one and only complaint about this reissue is that there is no new introduction - it is presented simply as it was published, which for some might be confusing; i.e. writing about the seven astronauts as if they were all still alive. There is an introduction by 'Life' and some black and white photographs and a detailed index.
What it does show is all the hope and naiveté of the time and the men involved, the mind set of the military and NASA then and all the hope and pride that went with it. It is indeed interesting to read again or for the first time. There is much emphasis on John Glenn, he seems to give longer and more detailed interviews. That is also what is fascinating about this account, it is the astronaut's words themselves; although one should be aware if you cannot tell that these are the public interviews. There is none of the gossip of private lives or complaints of operational conditions. Even the stories of failures, Gus Grissom's loss of his space capsule is dealt with as a disappointing accident as it was presented at the time: "at least we did not hide information like the Russians did concerning their space program".
Each of the seven tell of how they were chosen, how they worked together and were a team that brought America into space. These men, both the astronauts themselves and the NASA technicians that launched them are passing out of our lives. Only two of the original seven are left John Glenn and Scott Carpenter. (Oct. 2013...and now there is 1 ...
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Ulrich on August 6, 2004
I got this book from my dad, and he got it when it was first edited (the German version) in 1962. It was standing a long time untouched on my bookshelf but one day I took it out and started reading it. From the first moment I was fascinated. I think its the way the book is set up: Every different chapter is written by another astronaut of the mercury program. It gives a very good description of the mercury program, free worlds first manned step into space. But there is more: The astronauts not only describe the program, there is also a lot of information about the in-betweens, the personal relationships and characters of the seven. When you read the book you realy can feel the spirit and the atmosphere of that time. When I had the chance to visit the National Air and Space Museum I stayed there a whole day and at least 3 hours I used to inspect the two shown Mercury-capsules in the entrance. It was one of the most fascinating moments because when I looked at the space vehicles I always remembered things from the book.

This book has become a family heritage for me and when I will have children of my own one day I will of course give the book to them - to let them smell the spirit of these seven pioneers.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By space nut on November 2, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Excellent book! Very readable. I've read many space program books and there were things I learnt. This book provides a snapshot in time (post mercury, pre gemini?) that becomes more valuable as the years go by. It is also interesting reading between the lines regarding the group dynamic. Not the book for any hard-hitting revelations though. Recommended.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Thomas Erickson on August 13, 2010
I've read almost all the astronaut books. When I was a small boy the original 7 Mercury astronauts were my heroes.

This book is of great historical significance. Written in 1962 with stories by the actual astronauts themselves. Remember everything known about manned space was new then. Many scientists a decade before did not believe man could survive in space. Many believed the astronauts eyes would pull out or blindness would occur because of high Gs. Many believed the astronauts blood would boil because of changes in pressure or radiation would cook their insides. It was a time of great unknowns. These were the first Americans to go into space. Remember that many of the earlier Redstone and Atlas boosters exploded. These men were basically strapped in on top of a possible exploding bomb. They were ex test pilots and knew the risks. Such courage.

The new NASA handpicked these 7 men from many military test pilots. Due to spacecraft size restrictions the seven could be no taller than 5 ft 11 inches and weigh less than 180 pounds. Many difficult, strenuous and demeaning physical and mental tests were given to select the best of the best. NASA wanted level headed, courageous test pilots with engineering or equivalent college backgrounds for direct input on spacecraft features/design as well as the best possible pilots with lots of flying experience and being level headed in case of emergencies.

All 7 men... M Scott Carpenter, L. Gordon Cooper, John H. Glenn, Virgil Grissom, Walter M. Schirra, Alan Shepard, and Donald Slayton were all very competitive and wanted to be the first American in space. Alan Shepard was the first American in space. While "Deke" Donald Slayton was the last of the seven to go into space.
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