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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Surprise!
There are so many reasons why I shouldn't have liked this book. The ending was obvious from very early on, Watson was replaced with a husband and wife team of doctors, and, without giving anything away, Holmes behaved quite a bit out of character (the excuse given was that Watson too more liberties with his story than he ever admitted). For all of these reasons I should...
Published on February 25, 2012 by Amazon Customer

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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not very good
The atuhor is another of ever growing number of novelists who want to write their own mystery novels but who know that no one would care about their detective(s) or buy their books if they were stand alone novels. The only way they can encourage interest is by having "their" detectives be associated with the greatest fictional detective "Sherlock Holmes". One of these...
Published on February 6, 2012 by No BS guy


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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not very good, February 6, 2012
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This review is from: The Web Weaver (The Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes) (Paperback)
The atuhor is another of ever growing number of novelists who want to write their own mystery novels but who know that no one would care about their detective(s) or buy their books if they were stand alone novels. The only way they can encourage interest is by having "their" detectives be associated with the greatest fictional detective "Sherlock Holmes". One of these authors makes Sherlock an old fool married to a much younger and more intelligent wife. Another series has Sherlock taking every vacation in Minnesota with another more sophisticated American detective. This series(and this is the second novel in the series) makes Watson into a liar and charletan so that he can substitute a husband and wife team of amateur detectives in his place. It is a cheap trick and not very enjoyable.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Surprise!, February 25, 2012
This review is from: The Web Weaver (The Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes) (Paperback)
There are so many reasons why I shouldn't have liked this book. The ending was obvious from very early on, Watson was replaced with a husband and wife team of doctors, and, without giving anything away, Holmes behaved quite a bit out of character (the excuse given was that Watson too more liberties with his story than he ever admitted). For all of these reasons I should have put the book down after the first chapter, but I didn't. I enjoyed the story in spite of myself. I liked the characters of Henry and Michelle. I especially liked the historically believable Michelle... the strong, intelligent female character finding her way in Victorian London. Though it was strange, in a way I liked Henry and Michelle's perception of Holmes as less cold and calculating the the Conan Doyle stories portrayed him.

If you are a traditionalist, you won't like this story at all. There are too many things that will get on your nerves. If like me, you can't get enough of the many popular retellings and reinventions of Holmes (and you don't mind getting a little Austen in your Conan Doyle) then you will enjoy this book.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars The Second WORST "Holmes" book I have ever read, December 5, 2012
By 
Peterack (Alexandria, VA) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
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I am a Sherlock Holmes fan (yet admitedly not an expert...I cannot tell you off of the top of my head how many steps there are from the ground floor to his upper floor digs at 221b, but I digress) and have been reading books, and stories since I was gifted a full set of the Conan Doyle Canon one Christmas in 1976. In the ensuing years I devoured as many stories as I could get and there were plenty at the time. I am excited that in recent years many of these are being re-released and I am very much enjoying these stories by other authors...until now.

I will couch this that this is not THE worst Holmes book I have read (that was actually published in paper) but it runs close to it, and as I am remembering this is the 2nd worst (the first being one that had Holmes as a time traveler, Moriarity, as his clone from the future, and if I recall correctly Mrs. Hudson might have been an android...all fooling Watson for a number of years). This is not nearly THAT horrible but still....

Where do I begin? The Holmes in this is not Holmes. Even authors who have taken liberties with the character, such as Nicholas Meyer, still stick true to aspects of the character while this author tries as much as possible, while staying only as true to character as he must in order to call him "Sherlock Holmes," tries hard to make the character as foreign to the Conan Doyle creation as possible. I do not want to share much so as not to spoil the story, but a man attracted to women, with a wandering enough eye to openly flirt with married ladies really streches the character.

In fact, Holmes gets in the way of what the author appears to be writing about....a married couple, both who are doctors (remember this is the late 1800's and the latter was rare, unthinkable, and somewhat of a scandal). Their parts of the story were quite enjoyable, and I liken them to a turn of the early century Nick and Nora Charles (without the cocktails). This made me angry because it appears that the only reason to have Holmes presented throughout the book, was so that the author could call it a "Sherlock Holmes" novel and get his story published with a ready made audience. Holmes really was not needed and the author had a fine enough story without. Adding both doctors as narrators really muddied up things, and then having such spectacualr events (like spiders streaming out of a baked cake) just made the novel even more infuriatingly ridiculous.

I felt while reading this that the author not only pulled Holmes in so that he could raise sales by identifying this as a Holmes book, simultaneously disliked have to to so and took his anger out on the character and the Conan Doyle creation. This book is very dissapointing, very un Holmes like, more so than almost any Holmes-like novel I have read,and in my humble opinion is quite plodding and simply awful.

I try not to post too many "one star" negative reviews, but sometimes I want to do so to help warn others away. Do yourself a favor with good Holmes-like books (published in this same "Further Adventures of" series) like "the Giant Rat of Sumatra" or "The Star of India," or "The Stalwart Companions," and more...do yourself a favor and do not get caught in THIS "web."
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Holmesian with a Bent, January 15, 2012
This review is from: The Web Weaver (The Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes) (Paperback)
Sam Siciliano follows Angel of the Opera with The Web Weaver. Angel of the Opera was OK. This is better. Holmes is back in Baker Street rather than in Paris. A gypsy has cursed the some of the rich and powerful of London who are attending a ball. Part of the consequences of this are that one of the attendees, Donald Wheelwright engages Holmes to find out what happened and to protect him and his wife. An advance of 500 pounds secures Holmes' services. Henry Vernier, Holmes' cousin, and his wife Michelle are part of this because Michelle is physician to Violet Wheelwright, Donald's wife. The action takes off from here. It is a good addition to the Holmes saga. There is action, deduction, disguise and finally a denouement worth reading almost 400 pages to come to.

There are some things to be aware of. First, the story is told from the alternating viewpoints of Henry and Michell with the reader left to determine who is speaking or observing from the context. After a while, this becomes annoying to some degree. Second, Holmes seems to be a bit slow on the uptake at times. Apparently, the infallible detective was an invention of the Good Doctor. Finally, the villain is to some degree telegraphed rather early. You read to determine how and why.

In spite of those quibbles, this is a good story to read. I hope that you do enjoy it.
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5.0 out of 5 stars It's a different world than Doyle, but a facinating story!, October 12, 2014
By 
Raven "Raven" (Blue Ridge Mountains, VA USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Web Weaver (The Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes) (Paperback)
Sherlock Holmes: The Web Weaver by Sam Siciliaco

Disclaimer: This is the second book written by Mr. Siciliano with his unique and unusual take on Sherlock Holmes. In Mr. Siciliano’s world, the stories are written by Doctor Henry Vernier, cousin and sometimes fellow adventurer to Sherlock Holmes.

In Mr. Siciliano’s world, Watson has moved from Baker Street following his second marriage. Watson is painted by Dr. Vernier and indeed Sherlock Holmes, as a mediocre author and a sometimes unreliable ally—but his Bulldog bravery and crack shooting are unquestioned.

Be sure to look for Sam Siciliaco’s other Holmes books in this series, The Angel of the Opera, and The Grimswell Curse!

If you are a Holmes purist, this book might not be for you, but you should give it a try anyhow!

Holmes is discussing his career with his companion and cousin Doctor Henry Vernier, when he mentions something Watson had, according to Holmes, simply made up. That something is Professor Moriarty. But now that little invention has caused Holmes to be more careful in his examination of his cases, and the pattern is actually there. There is a highly developed mind behind much of the crime in London. Holmes has discovered that a Moriarty actually exists!

Doctor Vernier’s wife Michelle, also a Doctor with a thriving practice, spends time in a free clinic once a week serving the poor of London. She is accompanied by a dear friend Violet Wheelwright, who is married to the heir of the Wheelwright Potted Beef Company.

She has a story to tell of a Pauper’s Ball attended by the rich and famous, where the rich come dressed as the poor. During this party an old gypsy woman argued with Violet, cursed her to be barren and cursed the whole party with the vilest maledictions she can imagine.

Since the party, the curse has seemed to come true. Holmes is approached by Mr. Wheelwright who claims there is great danger to his wife Violet because of this Gypsy curse. At her birthday party, spiders spill from the cake when it is cut, terrifying Mr. Wheelwright and most of the guests.

Other members of society who attended the Pauper’s Ball have met with disaster. Lord Harrington has killed himself due to his dalliances with a prostitute being discovered after the party. George Herbert discovers that his wife’s £100,000 necklace is in fact a fake, the real necklace stolen.

Everything seems to point back to that Gypsy at the Pauper’s Ball. Holmes discovers a swindle involving oil wells; a movement called “The Angels of the Lord” who urge prostitutes and servants to press for better treatment and wages, while also providing blackmail evidence for a good price; and other such criminal enterprises.

Holmes discovers the people behind most of the criminal stunts, but it is soon obvious that they cannot be Holmes’ missing “Moriarty.” Meanwhile Mrs. Violet Wheelwright is viciously attacked, choked, and deeply scratched across her shoulder. Mr. Wheelwright is angry and threatens Holmes. His father, the elder Mr. Wheelwright tries to get Doctor Vernier to help him have Violet committed.

The reveal is too good to ruin. Mr. Siciliano has produced another masterpiece in his unique version of Sherlock Holmes. The story is so fascinating that it is hard to put down. There is always one more major reveal, one more sordid crime, one more missing clue around the next corner. The story never drags; the action and Holmes frustrations with his deductions keep the story fresh and riveting.

This book gets five stars out of five, only because six isn’t allowed! Encore! Encore!

Quoth the Raven…
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3.0 out of 5 stars This was a fairly average Sherlock Holmes pastiche., July 28, 2014
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This was a fairly average Sherlock Holmes pastiche. The mystery was easily solved but the motive was not clear. Once that was established all that was left was to resolve the (view spoiler). The book should and could have been 30 pages shorter.

I felt the writing was strong but a couple of swift mood changes seemed awkward, "that escalated quickly" moments. There was also a poorly placed scene of passion between Holmes' cousin and his wife that just came across as bizarre.

3 STARS
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5.0 out of 5 stars The web weaver, February 2, 2014
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This review is from: The Web Weaver (The Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes) (Paperback)
This author does justice to the old Arthur Conan Doyle character. His writing is very similar. I enjoyed the book very much.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Sherlock Holmes and the real Moriarty, October 15, 2012
By 
Philip K. Jones (St. Clair Shores, MI United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Web Weaver (The Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes) (Paperback)
This is Mr. Siciliano's second Sherlockian novel. I have already posted my review of his first, "The Angel of the Opera." This novel is told, in alternate chapters, from the viewpoint of Sherlock's cousin, Dr. Henry Vernier and that of his cousin's wife, Dr. Michelle Duodet-Vernier. These two viewpoints give the reader a more balanced view of Victorian English society than is normally afforded in the stories presented by Dr. Watson. The episodes narrated by Michelle are especially enlightening as they point up the absurd position held by women in that `civilized society.'

In this book, Sherlock Holmes meets and combats his true intellectual equal, the real 'Moriarty' that pervades the society of late Nineteenth Century England like a spider spinning a web with tendrils that connect through the highways and byways of life. In addition, we get to see a more human side of Holmes than that presented by Dr. Watson.

Dr. Henry Vernier is visiting Sherlock in October, 1894 when one Mr. Donald Wheelwright comes to call. The case brought by Mr. Wheelwright began at a Pauper's theme masked ball held in January, 1893 by a society friend. At the ball, Mrs. Wheelwright was cursed by a gypsy intruder and the curse has been reiterated by a note seemingly left at random in their home within the last few days. Sherlock is hired to uncover the person generating this threat and to remove any danger from Mrs. Wheelwright. Please note that Dr. Vernier disputes Watson's account of The Great Hiatus and Holmes' absence from London between 1891 and 1894.

The details of the case and its societal implications seem to keep growing as Sherlock investigates. Suicides, perhaps murders, blackmailing, social unrest and conflicts ranging from the ratting parlors and whorehouses to the upper crust of society keep popping up. No common threads are seen, but the victims are connected by their attendance at the masked ball.

The unique flavor of the Watson tales is missing. We do not see "The Great Detective," with magnifying glass in hand, showing New Scotland Yard the error of their ways. Instead, we see Sherlock in intimate contact with the suffering and vice of the Victorian World. We see debauchery hand-in-hand with pietistic snobbishness and desperation allied with hopelessness. The mystery is complex but not baffling. What is difficult to see is a reasonable solution.

This book was excellently edited. I only found a few spelling errors, particularly those British affectations of French spelling which so puzzle Americans. On the other hand, the characters persist in speaking in full sentences and keeping paragraphs all in one tense. I would be most frustrated were I an English teacher.

Reviewed by: Philip K. Jones, October 2012
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3.0 out of 5 stars It's not the best but really, it's not bad., August 7, 2012
This review is from: The Web Weaver (The Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes) (Paperback)
This was the first book adaptation of Sherlock Holmes I had ever read. I was skeptical at first but I did enjoy it. There are a few things that could probably have been done differently or at least cut out. Like the general badmouthing of Watson and pretty much calling him a liar, or the toning down of Sherlock's abilities. Every time Watson is brought up, it's either in bad light or in general 'Oh, yeah, Watson? Yeah, we aren't that close, really.' The downplaying of Sherlock's abilities was rather dull too. It made the story less...exciting, I suppose. When I read a Sherlock Holmes story, adaptation or ACD canon, I want to see Holmes doing what he does best: Deducing and observing in a way people can't. And this just made him seem like some average man who can do it all but not as well. He really just didn't feel like the Sherlock Holmes we know and love.

It's a good book, it really is. It's not the best, though. There are far better adaptations that you can read, but it really isn't too bad.
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1.0 out of 5 stars ugh, May 24, 2012
This review is from: The Web Weaver (The Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes) (Paperback)
As a Sherlock Holmes novel, it was one of the worst. I don't mind deviations or twists from the original, but because of the alternating points-of-view it barely had Sherlock Holmes in it. The reader figures out what is going on long before Holmes, which makes reading the rest tedious. The secondary characters completely take over the plot and they're interesting, but not as compelling as Holmes or Watson. The wife of the client plays a big part of the book and is hysterical for most of it. The ending is insipid and forced myself to finish it. Unless you're into the hardships of Victorian England for the poor and women- skip.
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The Web Weaver (The Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes)
The Web Weaver (The Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes) by Sam Siciliano (Paperback - January 10, 2012)
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