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42 of 49 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "That which can be imagined need never be lost..."
...and your imagination will never want to lose the excellence of this book. I have just finished reading Weaveworld for the third time and still find myself at a loss for words to capture its brilliance. Really, it defies explanation. Barker has created what I consider to be one of his greatest novels, heck! it's almost THE greatest novel. Its immensity allows its...
Published on January 15, 2000 by philip@robertlees.freeserve.co.uk

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29 of 35 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Powerful But Tainted Vision
Weaveworld is a bludgeoning fusion of occult schlock-horror and heroic fantasy and is populated by a motley of vividly depicted characters. Cal and Suzanna's mundane entry on the scene contrasts effectively with the other-worldly horrors than ensue. The intriguing child/man Nimrod provides some humerous tableaux. Immacolata provides us with a deliciously evil...
Published on February 9, 2000 by Cartimand


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42 of 49 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "That which can be imagined need never be lost...", January 15, 2000
This review is from: Weaveworld (Mass Market Paperback)
...and your imagination will never want to lose the excellence of this book. I have just finished reading Weaveworld for the third time and still find myself at a loss for words to capture its brilliance. Really, it defies explanation. Barker has created what I consider to be one of his greatest novels, heck! it's almost THE greatest novel. Its immensity allows its creator to use every aspect of great story telling to leave you feeling like you've just experienced something divine. It is an epic adventure of monumental proportions into a great secret world called 'The Fugue', that has been hidden away in order to elude its notorious enemies. Following the exploits of the two main characters, Cal and Suzanna, it tells us how they unravel (literally) the secrets behind the Weaveworld. This brings them into contact with some of Barkers most timeless and unforgettable characters, more notably so Immacolata and her side-kick the shifty salesman Shadwell. Mysterious, magical, loveable and terrifying - this book has it all. I particulaly love this book because of 'The Orchard of Lemuel Lo', with its entertaining magic and Jude Pears. A part of the book Clive Barker based on a early personal experience. It's just such a great chapter, magical in its peculiarities and believable by its veracity.
There are moments of exquisite tenderness and poetry in this book and moments that will have you practically tearing the page to turn it and find the answers to the many questions Barker poses throughout. The story will take you beyond reality, beyond fiction, beyond poetry and beyond fantasy to deliver you to an ambience that will intice, elate and overwhealm you. You will truly wish the story to never end, which in a way it never does - you have to experience it to understand. Suffice it to say Weaveworld is Heaven of a different form, only read it if you have plenty of breath to catch, tears to cry and imagination to be inspired, stretched and truly amazed.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Absolutely Stunning., November 27, 2004
By 
This review is from: Weaveworld (Paperback)
It had taken me a month to read this book and I happen to be a very fast reader. There was so much detail and description that I had to try and take it all in. Reading this is very similar to observing the weave that Barker describes so eloquently in the pages of this book. On my cover, it says "An Epic of the Imagination." And that, indeed, is.

The plot was intricate, matching the idea of a weave. It incorporated so many things that I love, mythology, religion and a complex plot. The language is evocative and poetic but also very stripped and common-place at the same time. The characters were very intriguing and realistic and each one was symbolic.

My favorite character out of the bunch was not a hero but rather a villain. I happened to adore the character of Immacolata. She was so cold and so vicious. She was a complete original and I happen to love it.

So overall, a rather engaging read and a masterpiece. It may even be one of my favorite novels but most definately, the best read I had all year.
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29 of 35 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Powerful But Tainted Vision, February 9, 2000
By 
Cartimand (Hampshire, UK.) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Weaveworld (Mass Market Paperback)
Weaveworld is a bludgeoning fusion of occult schlock-horror and heroic fantasy and is populated by a motley of vividly depicted characters. Cal and Suzanna's mundane entry on the scene contrasts effectively with the other-worldly horrors than ensue. The intriguing child/man Nimrod provides some humerous tableaux. Immacolata provides us with a deliciously evil villainess, her character made all the more complex by elements of poignancy and reconciliation surrounding her demise, and the chief miscreant - Shadwell is an effective personification of the "all power corrupts..." maxim.
The sheer vileness though of some of the apparitions that Barker conjures forth demands the reader possess a strong stomach and reminds us that, first and foremost, this is a horror novel. What else should we expect from the author who gave us the visceral terrors of Hellraiser? The tale is also frequently punctuated by explicit (and some may say unnecessarily gratuitous) sexual imagery, which some may find tasteless.
One major problem I had with Weaveworld is that I felt it reached its peak about two thirds of the way through. The most satisfying chapters are undoubtedly Cal and Suzanna's adventures in the Fugue and their heart-stopping flight to keep out of Shadwell and Hobart's clutches. Once the Fugue is unwoven though and the Seerkind scattered, the tale seems to lose direction somewhat. In particular the appearance of the entity calling itself Uriel really doesn't seem to fit comfortably with what has gone before and reads more like a novella in its own right. I'm afraid for me, the conclusion of the Uriel episode reminded me of some of Star Trek's more hackneyed finales, and I must confess to feeling slightly cheated by the rather tame conclusion.
Overall though, Weaveworld is undoubtedly a pretty compelling read and reminds one of some of the more macabre paintings of Bosch or Breughal brought to life. Be warned though; it often plumbs the depths of depravity and the aftertaste it leaves may be something less wholesome than the sweet nectar of Jude pears!
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19 of 23 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Barker fans should love this, others may find it falls short, May 11, 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Weaveworld (Paperback)
There is no denying that Clive Barker is a creative man. "Weaveworld" is a testament to that. He creates a mythology peopled with an array of strange and bizarre creatures, a land built of every fantasy cliché but never itself feeling clichéd, and a tale full of inventive twists and turns.
Yet for all that, for all the book's burning creativity, "Weaveworld" too often fails to captivate, too often uses what feel like cheap plot twists to keep the reader moving along, and too often drags down to a near halt to make it a must read.
The plot hinges around a carpet in which is hidden a mystical land. The carpet, and the land, are hunted by many, including the Seerkind, Barker's twisted take on the folk of fairy tales. A pair of seemingly innocent bystanders fend off close call after close call in an effort to keep the carpet out of the wrong hands - and even venture into the wondrous world itself. The idea is fabulous and the characters unique and interesting.
Unfortunately, "Weaveworld" feels more like a series of interconnected novellas than an epic novel. The plot surges forward with a gripping buildup and a series of several thrilling climaxes, only to slow to a grinding halt. Then the process starts all over again. This takes place several times in just the few hundred pages. It's maddening.
It's also unfortunate. Barker is a good writer, better than one would expect if all they know of him is "Hellraiser." His prose isn't bad at all, his ability to let a scene unfold very good, and he can send shivers down a reader's spine at will. He mixes horror and fantasy well. But no matter how much the readers wants them to, in "Weaveworld," the pieces fail to come together.
There is enough here to like that some readers will find great enjoyment in the book - it's by no means bad, and has plenty of fresh ideas - but my own inability to really get captured by "Weaveworld" makes it impossible to recommend. If you're already a Barker fan, however, you'll probably want to read this. It's another example of his twisted and unique imagination.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Nothing Ever Begins, November 12, 2003
By 
This review is from: Weaveworld (Paperback)
And with that line we pick up on this story without a beginning and without an end.
We meet Calhoun Moody and Suzannah Parrish. Two people who come together. Cal, who lives with his depressed dad and pigeons. And Suzannah who travels from England to at the wish of a cryptic note from her Grandmother she barely knew. She finds her on her death bed. These two are brought together during a run in with a human salesman and the incantatrix Immacolata, who is using the salesman for her will. They are after a carpet. A carpet that houses the Seerkind. Immacolata was once one of them, but she escape now she want them destroyed.
And so the story goes from there. Suzannah (who receives part of Immacolata's menstruum, and thus some of her powers), and Mad Mooney must get this carpet back from those two eveil people. They are met by a few stragglers from "The Fugue" who help (and don't help) the two on their journey. This is an epic fantasy novel that could rival classics like The Riftwar Saga and The Lord of the Rings.
Clive Barker uses his masterful writing to paint us a beautifl image of England as well as The Fugue, the two places that most of the story is told in. And the words all weave together to tell this wonderful story. And if reading that last three paragraghs doesn't bring a tear to your face as you finally close this chapter of the adventure, I don't know *what* will.
You owe it to yourself to pick this wonderful book up and give it a read.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Unearthing memories, August 31, 2002
By 
Lustrous (Denver, CO United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Weaveworld (Mass Market Paperback)
.
The first of Barker's books I've ever read, and it impressed me:
For one, I was 100 pages into the book before I thought to check what page I was on. That never happens. But Weaveworld is *extremely* easy to start into...
For two, Barker's writing style is so immersing that at times I found myself believing the magics described in Weaveworld to be real.
And, lastly, whether it be good or bad, I found myself overcome with longing throughout much of the book--for the Fugue, the magics, the fairy tale happiness (and fairy tale horror)... these are things I thought I was through wishing for when I grew into adulthood (I'm 20 now).
Weaveworld has unearthed many of my childhood memories--something Barker intended, no doubt--and I find myself pleased that it did so. If you suspect you're like me, that you might be pleased, that you're prone to believing in magic...
get ahold of Weaveworld. And if you're a molded literary machine (if your heart was lost long ago) perhaps you shouldn't read this book.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It made my heart ache., November 3, 1997
By A Customer
This review is from: Weaveworld (Mass Market Paperback)
When I first picked up a book by Clive Barker, it was one of the first books that I thought i would treasure forever. It was "The Theif of Always," given to me by my father. I have read it more times than i can count. Then one day, i picked up "Weaveworld," and I could not let it go, I could not put it down. It had to be the best book i have ever read in my short life of sixteen years. When i read it, it made my heart ache. I wanted to be there, in the Fugue. I wanted so much to see the splendors of Shadwell's coat, and the wonders of Immacolota's magic. I wanted to be Calhoon, to see the wonderous and strange land stretched out before me. But it is, of course, all fantasy. I will never see the Weaveworld, will never step where Calhoon, Suzanna, Immacolota, or Shadwell once stood. It is, after all, a fantasy, and epic adventure written by the master of fiction, Clive Barker himself. And it makes my heart ache to think of it. But who knows, maybe Mr. Barker has seen into a world that onl
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Forget what you think you know about Clive Barker, February 2, 2003
By 
This review is from: Weaveworld (Mass Market Paperback)
I bought this book years ago just based on the premise, but I just recently got around to reading it. Now I think of the time wasted by not reading it as a loss of time I could have spent being enlightened by the knowledge this book has to offer.
This is, on a primitive level, a fantasy book. However, don't judge it by that genre. In fact, it's more of a magical realism work, in which most of the novel takes place in present day Liverpool. The book uses that as its anchor, in order for the reader to better accept the fantasy element that is the Fugue (aka the Weaveworld). The main character, Cal, is an Everyman: flawed, but universally likeable.
The best part of the characters is that their motives are never completely clear cut; you have to keep reading to understand them. They each seem to represent the best--and worst--of all of us.
In short, this book is a work of art. Its message (to give homage to your dreams in the chance they may come true) is something even kids will get. Buy this book!
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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe - Barker style., November 1, 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Weaveworld (Mass Market Paperback)
....or to put it another way "there's a world in that carpet, no-one believes me and now the wicked witch is chasing me for it". Oh, I know, its unfair to make comparisons with C.S.Lewis but all the poor souls dishing out five stars for this book must have missed out before they hit teenagehood. Its a good read, but to be honest I didnt read any words that would move me such that I would care what happened to the carpet or its inhabitants. There's horror and gore in this book but at times it seems over the top and misplaced. And why does Clive Barker constantly make references to male genitalia? Honestly, after 700 pages I was dreading to read the effect of cold weather on our hero, it really does get that ridiculous. Anyway, it was my first read of a Clive Barker book and Im looking forward to the next one, despite my own personal gripes - I thought his idea for the book was great and well worth the time it took to read it. I wanted to give five stars, I really did, but there's a real lack of depth to Suzanna here and no real insight into to the kind of people she bravely tries to save.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Stunningly beautiful edition of Weaveworld!!!, January 16, 2013
This anniversary edition of Weaveworld is absolutely beautiful!!! Oversized with heavy paper. Two color printing and 40 pieces of art!! $45 is a huge huge bargain for a book of this quality!
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Weaveworld 1ST Edition
Weaveworld 1ST Edition by Clive Barker (Hardcover - 1987)
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