Web Bloopers: 60 Common Web Design Mistakes, and How to A... and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$10.44
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Clean. Great Binding. Cover Shows Light Wear.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Web Bloopers: 60 Common Web Design Mistakes, and How to Avoid Them (Interactive Technologies) Paperback – April 28, 2003

14 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$354.40
Paperback
"Please retry"
$13.10 $0.48
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Amazon Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Hero Quick Promo
Save up to 90% on Textbooks
Rent textbooks, buy textbooks, or get up to 80% back when you sell us your books. Shop Now

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Jeff Johnson’s sharp eye for usability, coupled with plenty of examples and recommendations, can transform even the dullest and most complicated site into a sleek example of Web usability."
--Nina Malakooty on Firstmonday.org

"Engaging, Educational, Enjoyable, Erudite: Excellent!"
--Dr. Jakob Nielsen, Nielsen Norman Group

"Many of the examples are priceless ― just reading them made my blood boil with recognition."
--Howard Tamler, Principal, HT Consulting

"If you are part of a Web team, Web Bloopers is a must-have book. If you know anyone who is developing Web sites, give them this book as a present. It's fun and it's informative...Get and read this book. Give it to your favorite Web developers--and to your least favorite Web developers. You'll all learn from it."
--Ginny Redish in Technical Communication

"Each section puts a name to a common mistake, gives several real-world examples of its occurrence, and then explains what the site's designers should have done instead." - C/C++ Journal

Book Description

Provides web designers with the do's and don'ts of designing web site graphic-user interfaces (GUI)
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Shop the New Digital Design Bookstore
Check out the Digital Design Bookstore, a new hub for photographers, art directors, illustrators, web developers, and other creative individuals to find highly rated and highly relevant career resources. Shop books on web development and graphic design, or check out blog posts by authors and thought-leaders in the design industry. Shop now

Product Details

  • Series: Interactive Technologies
  • Paperback: 344 pages
  • Publisher: Morgan Kaufmann; 1 edition (April 28, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1558608400
  • ISBN-13: 978-1558608405
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 10.2 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,090,869 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Jeff Johnson is President and Principal Consultant at UI Wizards, Inc., a product usability consulting firm that offers UI design, usability reviews, usability testing, and training (http://www.uiwizards.com). He has worked in the field of Human-Computer Interaction since 1978. After earning B.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Yale and Stanford Universities, he worked as a user-interface designer and implementer, engineer manager, usability tester, and researcher at Cromemco, Xerox, US West, Hewlett-Packard Labs, and Sun Microsystems. At Xerox he worked on successors to Xerox's famed Star workstation. At Sun he worked for the "skunkworks" that produced Java. Jeff has taught at Stanford University and Mills College. He was an Erskine Teaching Fellow at the University of Canterbury in Christchurch New Zealand in 2006 and 2013. He has published numerous articles and book chapters on a variety of topics in Human-Computer Interaction and the impact of technology on society (see http://www.uiwizards.com/portfolio_publications.html). He is a member of the ACM SIGCHI Academy. He frequently gives talks and tutorials at conferences and companies on usability and user-interface design. He is the author of GUI Bloopers: Don'ts and Dos for Software Developers and Web Designers (2000), Web Bloopers: 60 Common Design Mistakes and How to Avoid Them (2003), GUI Bloopers 2.0: Common User Interface Design Don'ts and Dos (2007), Designing with the Mind in Mind (2010), and Conceptual Models: Core to Good Design (2011, co-authored with D. Austin Henderson). A second edition of Designing with the Mind in Mind was published in early 2014.

He is married to Karen Ande, a documentary photographer who works for relief organizations in Africa that support children orphaned by HIV/AIDS, and who is also the author of a book (see http://FaceToFaceAfrica.com).

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Jessica Sant on August 22, 2003
Format: Paperback
If you get paid to develop a website, you should have this book. As the title says, "Web Bloopers" details 60 of the most common (and annoying) design mistakes committed by web developers and then tells you how to avoid them.
Each blooper is explained in words as well as in pictures (snapshots are taken of various sites around the web), and then the author explains why the blooper is so bad and how to avoid it. As with any design, there are trade offs, sometimes you have to commit one blooper to avoid another, but as long as you realize that's what you're doing, you're gold. This book is very well organized. The title of each blooper is a good summary of the problem. The index in the back helps you to quickly find examples both good and bad (and it also lets you see if you're company has been made an example of). The author even points out some blooper's in his own publisher's website.
If everyone who is responsible for creating websites took the time to read this book, think about the user, how intuitive their site is, and how easy it is to glean information from it, the Internet would be a much nicer and friendlier place. I highly recommend this one.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By M. Chabot on September 16, 2004
Format: Paperback
I found this book to be a bit lacking. I have read most of the usability books on the market, and this book did not cover anything new. The author did not go into the science behind the bloopers and does not cite any studies that were conducted. Rather, he uses pictures to back up each blooper. The book is 60-70% pictures. The layout of the book made it hard to read, since the pictures constantly interrupted the text flow.

You can find the list of bloopers on the author's Web site and I do not think this book adds much additional value, since most experienced Web developers have already seen examples of each blooper. You can find better descriptions of usability problems by doing a Web search. This book would be appropriate for a new Web designer/developer, or someone who has not already read much about usability.

In conclusion, most Web developers would be better off with the book Don't Make Me Think, a Jakob Nielsen book, or an Information Architecture book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 24, 2003
Format: Paperback
Jeff Johnson has become known to a wider audience through his book GUI Bloopers, in which he describes common user interface design sins. His new book Web Bloopers continues on this track and offers a list of 60 common Web design mistakes.
The author not only illustrates the mistakes through examples but also gives advice on how to avoid them.
The overall sequence of parts and chapters starts with deep issues of Website content, operation, and task flow and proceeds to more surface-level presentation issues.
Every blooper is followed by hints on how to avoid it.
The book is supplemented by a Website, web-bloopers.com. Among others, readers will find there a very useful list for checking Websites before publishing them on the Web.
It is an excellent, well-illustrated resource for anyone whose work touches on web usability issues.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By shaw6 on November 26, 2003
Format: Paperback
As web designers, we have a responsibility to avoid the worst mistakes. There are so many of them to make, and they are so easy to avoid!
By using this well-presented book, you can design a site that avoids the worst bloopers.
Rigid rules are rarely 100% right, but I don't think that's the intention here. I'm sure Jeff Johnson is aiming for "rules of thumb".
I'm not always sure I agree with his solutions, and they won't always work in every situation. Sometimes the blooper would be the right solution in a particular instance.
But as a starting point everything in this book makes good sense, and the examples show clearly what he's talking about.
It's an easy read as well. I highly recommend it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Stuart Gardner VINE VOICE on October 4, 2004
Format: Paperback
I'm an auditor, I review other peoples work and decisions. I wanted something to help provide a structure to assess web site quality. I don't want to appear like the Boss in the Dilbert Cartoons but I needed a "soft" introduction - I'm not creative! My home page is sufficient evidence of very limited design skills [...]

The cliche "a picture speaks a thousand words" is appropriate for this book. It provides illustrations of good and bad practice to illustrate common mistakes. There may be better books on web design, with more technical guidance, however this book could prevent expensive mistakes that could damage your brand and ruin customer experience.

If you are hiring a web designer, or approving the work of an internal team, this is probably the best book on web design you could buy. The book concludes with a 60 question checklist.

This is a great book to assess the end product and fine tune your site. It should also help avoid making mistakes along the way. It is short on creativity. That's not what I was after, so I'm not disappointed. I like the checklist allot (suppose I have been in audit too long!).
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Tanya Charbury on April 13, 2005
Format: Paperback
I saw the author's presentation at SD West 05, and that made me even more interested in reading this book. Jeff obviously understands the material very well, and he explains the issues eloquently. Fortunately, his book is at least as impressive as his verbal presentation.

As a Web/database developer (and small business owner) I have been steadily working my way through his "Web Bloopers" book. It's great stuff, and I enjoy reading it slowly and carefully pondering each issue. The more I read, the more I realize how desperately my own company's Web site needs to be improved.

One of my clients is tasked with improving an intranet site at a large Bay area computer company, and I've just recommended this book to the client. If the senior stakeholders read the book, it's likely to greatly the odds of project success.

Many IT-related books have good ideas. What makes Jeff's book so special is that he makes the learning process so enjoyable, with his interesting and funny real-world examples.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews