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Wednesdays were Pretty Normal: A Boy, Cancer, And God Paperback – March 1, 2012


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 264 pages
  • Publisher: B&H Books (March 1, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1433671697
  • ISBN-13: 978-1433671692
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.7 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (121 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #417,440 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Michael Kelley is a Bible study writer and editor whose previous works include Holy Vocabulary and The Tough Sayings of Jesus. He holds a Master of Divinity degree from Beeson Divinity School in Birmingham, Alabama. Michael and his wife have three children and live in Nashville, Tennessee.

More About the Author

Michael Kelley is an author, editor, and communicator whose previous works include Holy Vocabulary: Rescuing the Language of Faith and The Tough Sayings of Jesus. Born in Texas, Michael holds a Master of Divinity degree from Beeson Divinity School in Birmingham, Alabama. Michael and his wife have three children and live in Nashville, Tennessee.

Customer Reviews

Michael Kelley, thank you for opening up your heart and sharing your story with us.
Daniel Darling
As someone who has suffered loss it was so meaningful and helpful for me to read the words of someone struggling with the same questions I have asked God myself.
kris_manon
Wednesdays Were Pretty Normal By Michael Kelley This book has a subtitle ...a boy, cancer, and God.
Kindle Customer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Darling VINE VOICE on March 6, 2012
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
As a pastor I have to counsel many who suffer. Often I'm at a loss as to what to say. I know the right Scriptures to present. I can reassure them that our people love them and are standing with them. But unless I've undergone a smilar trial, what do I say?

What do I tell the parent whose child has cancer? What do I tell the wife who grieves the breakup of her marriage? What do I tell my own wife who recently buried her mother at a too-young age?

There are great, theological books on suffering. Books I've read, used as a basis for preaching, and have internalized. They are good. And yet they still seem sort of sterile in a time of personal suffering. There are also many good personal books that talk about

the trials of suffering. But many of these lack the Scriptural basis for walking someone through difficulty.

This is why I so enjoyed Michael Kelley's book, Wednesdays Were Pretty Normal.

Kelly, a writer, pastor, blogger, and director of discipleship for Lifeway, takes us through his own personal nightmare. One day, a doctor delivered the news that no parent wants to hear: "You're son has lukemia."

I'm a father of four children. The thing I fear most in my life is the serious illness, injury or death of one of my kids. It's the news I hope I never have to hear.

How do you handle this? How do you endure the endless tests, treatments, complications, financial considerations, etc when your young child has cancer? Kelly walks you through their story with authenticity, vulnerability, and hope. Kelly writes so well, so poignantly and personally. He breaks down the Scriptures teaching on trials and suffering in such an original and practical way. This is a book on suffering and hope that is not theoretical.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By J. Lee on February 21, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
In Wednesdays Were Pretty Normal, Michael Kelley takes you through his son's battle with childhood leukemia and his own subsequent struggle with his faith. As Christians, we are taught that all things work for the glory of God. While this is true, it's not always easy to tell yourself that when your son is diagnosed with cancer, you've lost your job, or are struggling with addiction.

This isn't a book written only for parents whose kids have or have had cancer. It's written for anybody whose life hasn't gone exactly to plan. It's written for anybody who has been blindsided by tragedy or radical life change. It's written for anybody who has struggled. It's written for everybody.

At times moving, eye-opening, and occasionally humorous, Wednesdays Were Pretty Normal deserves a spot on your bookshelf, be it real or virtual.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Bill Cashell TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on August 23, 2012
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
The title "Wednesdays Were Pretty Normal" describes how the Kelley family lived until their two year old son Joshua was diagnosed with leukemia. Their normal life was turned upside-down in the months ahead as their little boy battled for his life. As you might expect, Joshua recovered and today is a healthy and growing boy. Before you blast me for giving away the ending, the real story is about the journey, and the challenges they faced as a family.

Some books are good at asking questions and some books are good at answering them, but few do a good job on both. This book is one of those exceptions. We get to experience Kelly's inner feelings as he questions his choices and beliefs, and then finds the answers that support him and his family.

The main reason it is easy to connect with this book is because Kelly really asks the same kind of questions I would ask if my son had cancer. You can feel the pain of a parent wondering of their child will even live to see his next birthday. You follow the family as they describe their good decisions and their regretfully bad decisions.

The book is strong on religious overtones, but I don't think that would be a surprise considering that he holds a Master of Divinity degree. In reality, I think many people turn to God or a higher power when they feel helpless when facing a great challenge. It is the intimacy of Kelly's writing that really brings the journey to life.

On a personal note, I probably related to this journey more than the average reader because I lost my own son four years ago and experienced many of the same feelings while asking many of the same questions. This book will not be for everyone, but it will be a big lift to those who feel strong religious ties and are facing any great challenge of their own.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Tim Challies TOP 500 REVIEWER on January 2, 2013
Format: Paperback
Some of the best writing, the writing that is most heartfelt and true, finds it source in life's deepest valleys. This is exactly the case with Michael Kelley's Wednesdays Were Pretty Normal.

Wednesdays were normal days for the Kelley family until they received the shocking news that their son Joshua, just two years old, had been diagnosed with leukemia. The normal life of this normal family was suddenly turned all around and upside down as their little boy battled for his life. The happy ending is that he won that battle and today is a healthy and growing boy. The journey, the subject of this book, is all the Wednesdays and other days between the diagnosis and the declaration that he is cancer-free at last.

There are books that are good at asking questions and books that are good at answering them but not so many that bring strength to both questions and answers. The joy of Wednesdays Were Pretty Normal is that it does both well, rather a rare combination. While this book has several notable strengths, allow me to point to just a couple of them.

The first has to do with the author's authenticity. Kelley asks the kinds of questions that so many parents may grapple with as they struggle through the reality of pain and disease and the very real possibility that their child may not live to celebrate his next birthday. This is not an abstract or academic discussion of suffering, but one that is authentic in every detail. Kelley invites the reader into his family's journey in both its highs and lows. Where he did well, he describes success, and where he did poorly, he describes failure. He humbly allows the reader to see both and through it all labors to point beyond himself.

The second strength has to do with the answers to those questions.
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