Customer Reviews


44 Reviews
5 star:
 (21)
4 star:
 (6)
3 star:
 (4)
2 star:
 (5)
1 star:
 (8)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Godard's best
An utterly brilliant pastiche from Godard. JLG gives us a nightmarish vision of contemporary bourgeois society in which the apocalypse takes on the form of a series of bloody car wrecks and cannibalistic revolutionaries running wild. Even the scenes that don't work, like the bizarre encounter with Emily Bronte and Louis Carroll and the 18th-century French revolutionary...
Published on May 22, 1999

versus
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Some Fun
At times silly, dark, boring, irreverent, fun, boring, hip, and boring (European). While Weekend pushes the or breaks the limits of the film medium stylistically, it adheres dogmatically to Marxist principles in terms of character (if you can call them that), plot, dialogue, and theme. Often sinks to the level of a religious propaganda film, strictly Marxist,...
Published 18 months ago by M. Buchholtz


‹ Previous | 1 25 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Godard's best, May 22, 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Weekend [VHS] (VHS Tape)
An utterly brilliant pastiche from Godard. JLG gives us a nightmarish vision of contemporary bourgeois society in which the apocalypse takes on the form of a series of bloody car wrecks and cannibalistic revolutionaries running wild. Even the scenes that don't work, like the bizarre encounter with Emily Bronte and Louis Carroll and the 18th-century French revolutionary reading a political tract, are forgiveable simply because they only add to the anarchic nature of the film. How many other movies have you seen that feature a woman screaming before a horrific car accident because she left her handbag inside, or a speech on Hitlerism and African slavery intercut with clips of traffic jams?
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


28 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Outstanding Film--But Not for Everyone..., July 24, 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Weekend [VHS] (VHS Tape)
The review on this page which claims that Weekend is one of the worst films ever missed the point and was not apparently, given the reviewer's qualms with the movie, the intended audience for the film.
Weekend marks Godard's nearly-formal break with "bourgeois film-making," i.e., film-making which has as its sole criteria to "entertain" (as in escapism), to engage in linear story-telling, and to reinforce film cliches, formulas, and all the trappings of popular western (and especially American) film-making.
In the movie, the audience witnesses the collapse of the narrative, the disintegration of formal film technique, and--more literally--the degeneration of western civilization. A ten-minute-long traffic jam, the barbarism of pig slaughters and corpses littering the countryside, and the unsympathetic characterizations of the bourgeois couple on whom the film centers (if it does indeed have a center) have not been filmed to entertain, to comfort, or to lull the audience, but to provoke thought, to engage actively, and--quite possibly--to enrage actively as well.
Arriving at a conclusion, being "pretty" or emotional, or arranging details tidily would defeat the purpose of Weekend, which is to illustrate incoherence, savagery, and decline. And, in this regard, perhaps no film has better tampered with the status quo of film-making than Godard's Weekend has.
Also, it must be remembered that Weekend is a reflection, to a great deal, of the turbulence of the sixties, and in particular the student protests in Paris in 1968. Marxism may seem to its modern audience to be passe and irrelevant, but at the time, it was still a viable "direction" for many countries--which does not of course imply Soviet communism or the communism of Mao, but a more orthodox marxism of Marx himself.
In short--and of course this review has been anything but short--Weekend is a powerful, decadent, and innovative piece of work which seeks (or sought) to elevate film itself to the level of progressiveness that other artistic media such as painting, music, and literature have pursued in the twentieth century under the banners of modernism and postmodernism. It has largely succeeded, but unfortunately, as evidenced by the glut of action films, bathroom-humor wallows, and awkward love stories increasingly popular today, he has inspired only a relative few film-makers to follow in his footsteps...
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


18 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The dangers of French Bank Holidays!, April 17, 2002
By 
"johnewark" (Hull, East Yorkshire, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Weekend [VHS] (VHS Tape)
With influences ranging from Freud to Marx, De Sade and Eisenstein having walk-on roles and the Parisian weekend transformed into an allegorical bourgeois hell,
Week-End is one of the defining films of the 20th Century. Born out of the nouvelle vague cinema (French New Wave), this is the terrible birth that is brought to light from J.L.Godard's obsession with prophesising the destruction and decline of the West. Even after taking into account his overt political messages, Weekend still exist as one of the most technically revolutionary pieces of cinema to emerge from his studios into a blinding glare of publicity and hostility.
Not content with depicting the destruction of western commercial values, Godard disrupts the visual narrative by interspersing film titles, book titles and music onto a background of patriotic red, white and blue colours. From a personal perspective, one of the most impressive sequences is an eight minute long tracking-shot of the Parisian highway which progresses from straightforward traffic jams to car-wrecks and the inevitable symbol of multinational Capitalism, a Shell oil truck. Essentially Week-End marks the 'Maoist period' of Godard's film-making career, during which he declared that 'the only way to be a revolutionary intellectual is to give up being an intellectual.'
Starring Mireille Darc and Jean Yanne, Week-End's fabular narrative is a weekend journey from Paris to Normandy which slowly becomes an apocalyptic struggle against the French peasant revolutionaries who continually intervene to prevent the couple meeting Darc's mother in order to find out whether they have successfully poisoned her father. This emblematic quest for the Capitalist Grail is hindered by a philosophising character from Dumas, two rebels (African and Algerian) masquerading as refuse collectors and Saint-Juste, before the couple are captured on their return to Paris by the Seine-et-Loise Liberation Front, a group of cannibalistic freedom fighters.
Godard's continued affinity with politics can be witnessed in his other Maoist films, Les Chinoise (1967), Le Gai Savoir and Tout Va Bien (1972). Despite accusations of pretension, he still remains one of the most provocative and influential film makers of his and future generations, whilst his immense cinematic output can be regarded as a Marxist biography of the previous century.
What was an initially ground-breaking piece of cinema has evolved into an essential European film. Heralded by Pauline Kael in the New Yorker as 'Godard's Vision of Hell, and it ranks with the visions of the greatest' and 'somewhere between Swift and Samuel Beckett, alternatively violent and tender, humorous and cruel' (Jan Dawson, Sight and Sound) Week-end is a film that must be seen to be believed and to miss this is to miss out on one of the spectacles of 20th Century cinema.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


21 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars My favorite Godard film, July 25, 2005
This review is from: Weekend (DVD)
WARNING: SPOILERS BELOW

I've not seen all of Jean-Luc Godard's films, but of those I have seen this is my favorite. The narrative concerns a conventional, middle class, married couple who conspire to take a weekend trip to kill the wife's parents for money.

The car trip taken by the couple is comprised of a series of disastrous, improbable, and perplexing events. Art terrorists, thieves, rapists, and Marxist revolutionaries assail the couple at all turns. France is being overrun by weirdos! Bloody, flaming car (and plane!) crashes are everywhere. Violent demise is at every turn.

In the movie is a famous traffic jam scene that employed what was, up until the time of this movie's making, the longest dolly ever made. The scene is absurd, comical, and one of the delights of the movie. Likewise, Godard was becoming interested in socialist politics at this time in his career, in light of the Vietnam war and anti-colonial struggles that were happening globally, so a lot of "revolutionary" ideas are expressed by characters in the film. Unfortunately Godard most often has people simply read manifestos to the camera. Godard's political interests are thus conveyed in an awkward, cumbersome way. You do not have to agree with they're saying in order to enjoy the film.

Having said that, the movie is still one hell of a ride -- no pun intended. The bourgeois couple at the heart of the story don't care about the flaming chaos around them. They just want their money. At one point the husband even sits idly by as a stranger rapes his wife.

As a journey narrative of two people, WEEKEND (or is it WEEK END?)is reminiscent of Alejandro Jodorwosky's 1968 FANDO & LIS. (There was something in the water in the late 60s.) Like Fando & Lis, Weekend is mainly a series of segments or vignettes strung together over the course of two protagonists' quest. In Fando & Lis's case the couple's uest is for the fabled City of Tar; in Weekend's case it's for an ample inheritance.

The last 30 minutes are the best in the film, as well as the most graphic. Comparisons to Pasolini's SALO or even John Waters's PINK FLAMINGOS may come to mind. In short, the bourgeois couple are kidnapped by mod-ish looking radical militants who look as if they've all come from an MC5 concert. One disturbing scene shows the actors actually slaughtering a duck and a pig on camera. The ducks headless neck suirts blood as its body twitches and its wings flap. The pig struggles as its throat is slit in front of the camera. Of course, people kill pigs and fowl everyday -- it's how a lot of folks are supplied with their favorite meals. What could possibly be wrong with showing it, Godard almost seems to ask?

But the radicals also, it turns out, like to literally eat the rich, too. One uncomfortable scene portrays a victim stripping naked, being killed, and then being prepared for a meal as a cook cracks two eggs over her lifeless body and then thrusts a fish into her vagina (not shown on camera). Finally, the bourgeois husband is killed and is served up with the pig meat. The wife, who seems to have accepted the militants' way of life at this point, dines on her husband's and the pig's flesh as the movie ends.

Not for everyone, but some sort of remarkable milestone in cinema. Chaotic, dangerous, transgressive, and never boring.

The version of WEEK END I saw was the PAL version, which featured a great transfer, nice lucid colors, and special features that included an interview with Godard cinematographer Raoul Coutard, who is actually quite humorous and likeable as he sheds light on the circumstances surrounding the making of the movie. ("Godard was in a bad mood most of the time he was making the film, hence all the car crashes," "Godard wanted to piss off the producer with this scene," etc., to paraphrase.)
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars darc, the spaced cowboy, December 12, 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Weekend [VHS] (VHS Tape)
a brilliant intellect's look at hell on earth -- a gorgeous, daft, two-timing blonde frenchwoman and her cheating bourgeoise husband spend the weekend dodging traffic jams, cannibals, car crashes and left-wing politicos -- a beautiful, bored french miasma. fender-benders and violence shot with typical, hilarious godard cynicism -- a must-see for godard fans -- won't make sense to others. won't make sense either way, but great fun for true believing new wavers.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Into the Wild, August 22, 2008
By 
This review is from: Weekend (DVD)
Jean-Luc Godard's "Weekend" has reached its four decade milestone. It's a surrealistic cinematic trip into Godard's commentary on then-contemporary French society. It doesn't have a straightforward plot; one assumes Godard didn't mean to have one.

"Weekend" begins with a couple enjoying double entendres in a drive in the country. They find themselves in an endless traffic jam, surrounded by hippies, Marxists, and those living the primitive live. It's a commentary on consumerism--but it's also a commentary on communism as well. Individuals are sacrificed to the community-literally-and the upper-class wife chows down on her husband,while a young woman is garnished with eggs. Communism consumes itself. Godard saw European society degenerating; he was prophetic. He critiques capitalism and communism alike.

"Weekend" is an afternoon trip... for the mind.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars OMG this is finally on Criterion and avaliable once again!!!, August 30, 2012
By 
Andrew Ellington (I'm kind of everywhere) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
Jean-Luc Godard is, quite possibly, the greatest director of all time. I know, that is a hefty title to heap on any individual, but every film I see by the master is better than the last and just further cements in my minds eye his staggering genius.

`Weed End' is no exception.

Godard frequently used his artistic approach to elaborate on the political dilemmas facing his country at that given time, and the Parisian 60's were a ripe canvas for Godard's superior sense of cinematic vision. The life of the bourgeois (for an interesting read, check out the Wikipedia page for `bourgeoisie', which will enlighten you on the very culture with which Godard pointed his camera lens) is dissected with brash statements that firmly underscore a point of view towards the political situations they found themselves in, using vivid and ridiculously obscene imagery and dialog to drive home the absurdity of the moment.

One, two, three, four...

The film revolves around a young Parisian couple who is sifting in their own moral callousness, each individual party possessing disturbed ideals and ideas. The two embark on a dreaded weekend with the wife's parents, where they fantasize about the demise of her father so as to reap the benefits of his will. Along the way they are bombarded with events out of their control that only serve to further embellish their misplaced priorities.

When their car is engulfed in flames, the cries for the loss of a handbag place a bold exclamation-point at the end of this couples `description'.

The absurdity of the film engulfs itself, really piling one ridiculous moment on top of the other, but all in a way that thrives within the context of the film. Godard was never a mainstream director, but he also created art pieces that told a story, that elaborated on truths not willingly admitted by those around him. Godard understood that filmmaking was a gift, a gift to be used as a tool to instill something in others. In all of his works, he did that very thing. With exaggerated sequences that uses unending tracking shots to create a feeling of uneasiness in the viewer (the never-ending traffic jam is one of many), Godard splashed visual wizardry on the screen and imprinted his political satire on the minds of the audience. Some have noted that Godard was a distant or cold director, but I find that aspect of his work endearing, for it sharply places a sense of realism in his wildly imaginative take on reality. There is nothing within `Week End' that appears real. In fact, even the protagonists here question their reality. The sequences (which involve, among other things, murder and cannibalism) all wear the stain of the absurd and yet they feel remarkably `honest' thanks to the `cold' approach that Godard takes. By stepping away from the characters and the moments and delivering a nonchalant take, he inserts a frigid sense of reality that makes this pill a lot easier to swallow.

We buy it, every image and every spoken word.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Weekend is Godard's greatest, except. . .?, June 9, 2013
By 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Jean Luc Godard has made many pictures for us. "Weekend" stands alone (is that possible?) amongst Godard's flicks. "Weekend" defines the emptiness of modern life with a feather rather than a whip. The next time you find yourself in a traffic jam, remember Jean Luc. Au revoir.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An intellectual black comedy..., May 18, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Weekend (DVD)
"Weekend" (1967) is directed by Jean Luc Godard (Breathless, Pierrot le fou, Le Mepris). This black comedy follows a bourgeois married couple, who both have secret lovers, and who are both planning the others' murder. They set off for her parents' home in the country to secure her inheritance from her dying father. On the way through the picturesque countryside they witness violent car accidents, as well as an assortment of characters, some from literature and history, and others representing the various classes in society. The film is broken up with intertitles that comment on the action as well as on the process of film viewing. Discussions from characters range from notions on identity to class struggle. The two protagonists seem intent on their sole and petty goal of the inheritance despite the fact that most everyone else around them are focused on more grave notions regarding philosophy and the binding relationships between humanity and the disparities between people and their rights and freedoms. This incongruous relationship between the two leads, and those around them, is enhanced by the jarring musical score which often sounds like the dramatic music from a film noire gangster film.

The film also includes some special features, including a commentary by critic David Sterritt, an interview with cinematographer Raoul Coutard, and a Mike Riggis interview about his views on the film.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Various nefarious, August 8, 2011
This review is from: Weekend (DVD)
Weekend (J.-L. Godard), F 1967
When Corinne and Roland hit the road in their flashy Facel Vega to kill Corinne's parents (secretly planning to kill the other later) they run among others into an endless traffic jam and a guerilla to witness the end of civilization. Godard's last traditional movie until 1980 is a Cassandra against uninhibited materialism and future Pol Pots.

Do you think this film should go BLU too?
Visit my Listmania lists 'Friends of Blu-ray' Pt. I-V

... and BLU it did go:Weekend (The Criterion Collection) [Blu-ray
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 25 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Weekend
Weekend by Jean-Luc Godard (DVD - 2005)
$29.95 $14.99
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Search these reviews only
Rate and Discover Movies
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.