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The Weekend That Changed Wall Street: An Eyewitness Account Hardcover – September 7, 2010


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Portfolio Hardcover (September 7, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1591843510
  • ISBN-13: 978-1591843511
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.3 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #647,581 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

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Customer Reviews

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It offers little analysis, historic background, explanation, or interpretation.
Christopher C. Tew
I know I can always always always count on any of your books to be A1, top-notch quality reading.
Michael Zivaljic
Maria writes about a complex subject in which she manages to help her readers understand.
Crestline Construction Carina Schmidt

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 30 people found the following review helpful By David Bahnsen on October 21, 2010
Format: Hardcover
It is tough to write this review, because I actually like Maria Bartiromo. It is hard to explain to people who do not watch a particular TV network 12 hours a day how you can end up feeling like you literally know the people on the network, but I assure you that it has happened to me (having the same network on in your office is different than watching it, I agree, but you get the point). I am working on 10 years plus of having Maria on in my office at her given slot every single business day of the year. The couple times I have met her I had to remind myself that I did not actually know her because it felt like I was conversing with someone whom I converse with every single day.

When I say I like Maria, I mean it. She is reasonably conservative in some issues, a progression many of the talking heads on CNBC have gone through, and she is New York tough. I was on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange with a trader from my firm who has been there for over 25 years and he told me that when Maria first showed up guys would literally hit her, elbow her, run into her - all in a spirit of protest about a female intruding on their hallowed ground. Maria held her own, won everyone over, and she is now an icon. I see that as a remarkable accomplishment.

So when I say that I want to like her new book on the financial crisis of 2008, I mean it. But it is really tougn to read - disjointed, boring, re-hashed, just bad. This is not to say that there are no interesting parts, because there are.
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21 of 28 people found the following review helpful By DKNY on September 11, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Maria added one more book to already many on 2008 crisis. I read "Too Big To Fail" by Sorkin last year and "The Big Shot" by Lewis this year and Maria's "The Weekend That Changed Wall Street" covers almost the same material but the stories are new. I would say that the events, which Sorkin left, got covered my Maria (her sources were different!)

One thing I noticed in "The Weekend That Changed Wall Street" is that Maria tries to get more attention by writing again and again "My source told me...", "I learned from my source..." etc. This is something I didn't find in Sorkin's or Lewis' books. Also, she started the book from her family and her career history and tried to establish a link with Wall Street events and so on.

"Too Big To Fail" is really a big book and takes time to go through and so Maria's book is perfect for someone in rush.

Sorkin ended "Too Big To Fail" covering events till 2008 and Maria went ahead to cover 2009 and early 2010.

A good book (3/5).
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Christopher C. Tew on December 3, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The Weekend That Changed Wall Street is sensational, simplistic, and self-centered. It offers little analysis, historic background, explanation, or interpretation. It is opinionated without giving the reasoning behind the opinions. It is best at providing a cast of characters, which means it is full of namedropping, and cutesy personal interest stories about the characters, nearly all of whom are family oriented, hard-working, honest folks who have been badly misunderstood and maligned. In short, it is typical of modern TV news reportage. Whatever Ms Whitney had to do with the book was not nearly enough to save it from Ms Bartiromo's superficiality. The last three chapters become almost humorous in their earnest banality and circuitous avoidance of obvious conclusions.
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Format: Hardcover
Riveting read hard to put down. Would recommend to anyone who followed the market to check this out.maria at her finest
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Format: Hardcover
Maria Bartiromo (born 1967) is an American television journalist ("Closing Bell" on CNBC), managing editor of The Wall Street Journal Report, and author of The 10 Laws of Enduring Success and Use the News: How To Separate the Noise from the Investment Nuggets and Make Money in Any Economy. She wrote in the Introduction to this 2010 book, "I decided to write [this book] in the hope that I could bring an insider's perspective to what happened to those directly affected... In this book I will explore what happened behind closed doors and provide an intimate look at the personal stories of those involved... I will provide the inside story about what really happened during the weekend that changed the financial world I have covered for twenty years." (Pg. 2)

She notes, "Unlike Bear Stearns, where stock in the company was mostly held by the top executives, Lehman had a trickle-down ownership culture, with the lower rungs of the company, such as executive assistants, paid in stock. If Lehman fell, there would be a lot of average people left with nothing." (Pg. 22)

She suggests, "the fact that so few people saw the danger building during the boom years is remarkable." (Pg. 37) She adds, "By 2007, the boom times were effectively drawing to an end. No more lavish parties. No more euphoria. It was Judgment Day." (Pg. 38-39) Later, she laments, "Now that the fall was happening, I was deeply disappointed and personally shaken. I knew that whatever the outcome of the weekend, things would never again be the same for any of us. There was a lot of pain ahead." (Pg.
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