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113 of 123 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great book - definitely not for beginners
This is a great book but it is definitely not for beginners. I am in the USMC and we need 20 pull ups for a perfect score. I have routinely scored in the 16-20 range but I have never been able to consistently nail 20.

I started with Phase I, week 4 and today I just started Phase II Week 2. I have kept up with every workout but I barely completed todays workout...
Published on July 4, 2011 by GoVOLS98

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127 of 133 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars misleading title
I was eagerly looking forward to the program because I wanted to get my pullup strength back. I completed P90X a couple of years ago and my biggest strength loss since then was in pullups. I took the test at the beginning of the book and did 7 pullups which put me in Phase 1. However I was unable to complete the week 1 day 1 workout. I came close but no cigar. I did...
Published on July 1, 2011 by Steve4404


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127 of 133 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars misleading title, July 1, 2011
By 
Steve4404 (New York, NY USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: 7 Weeks to 50 Pull-Ups: Strengthen and Sculpt Your Arms, Shoulders, Back, and Abs by Training to Do 50 Consecutive Pull-Ups (Paperback)
I was eagerly looking forward to the program because I wanted to get my pullup strength back. I completed P90X a couple of years ago and my biggest strength loss since then was in pullups. I took the test at the beginning of the book and did 7 pullups which put me in Phase 1. However I was unable to complete the week 1 day 1 workout. I came close but no cigar. I did exactly as the book specified (do nothing on the off days, only do the pullup program 3 days a week, wait at least 60 seconds between sets). Finally after 2 solid weeks I was able to get through the Week one day 1 program. It has taken me another 2 weeks and I still can't get all the way through week 1 day 2 , even when waiting 90 seconds between sets. So I am 4 weeks into the program and still trying to get through week 1. I am wondering if because I am older (I am 53) that I need more recovery days. I am going to stick with the program, I just think the title is very misleading.

UPDATE July 29, 2011-- After 7 weeks of the Phase 1 7 week program, I never made it past week 1 , day 2. After 7 weeks of this, I can now do 9 pullups. I am happy with the improvement and feel stronger but my improvement is miniscule compared to what others (especially the author!)have achieved. It is going to take a lot more than 7 more weeks (if ever) to get me to 15. This is an example of not everyone responding identically to the same program. It is not a bad program (hence my 3 star review) but be aware that your results my vary.
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113 of 123 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great book - definitely not for beginners, July 4, 2011
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This review is from: 7 Weeks to 50 Pull-Ups: Strengthen and Sculpt Your Arms, Shoulders, Back, and Abs by Training to Do 50 Consecutive Pull-Ups (Paperback)
This is a great book but it is definitely not for beginners. I am in the USMC and we need 20 pull ups for a perfect score. I have routinely scored in the 16-20 range but I have never been able to consistently nail 20.

I started with Phase I, week 4 and today I just started Phase II Week 2. I have kept up with every workout but I barely completed todays workout and looking ahead, I might need a few extra rest days in order to get through some of the sets.

This is a great book but I think that the "50 pull ups in 7 weeks" is extremely misleading. I have been doing pull ups for over 3 years and haven't broken 22. There is no magical book that is going to double my pull ups in 7 weeks but I feel like I am well on my way! I am going to write another review in a month to further document my progress.
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35 of 36 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good Book, Lousy Title, July 30, 2011
By 
Geoffrey J. Wilhelmy (La Crosse, Wisconsin) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: 7 Weeks to 50 Pull-Ups: Strengthen and Sculpt Your Arms, Shoulders, Back, and Abs by Training to Do 50 Consecutive Pull-Ups (Paperback)
Let me first establish my basis for reviewing this book. As a former active duty and now retired soldier, I've used pull ups (with push ups and parallel bar dips) for 25 years in my personal fitness program. I also coach high school cross country and track which was why I was interested in this book. I wanted to learn how to train kids who were unable to do even one pull up.
Let me first address the unfortunate title of the book that is why I will not award this book a 5 star rating. I suspect the title was the decision of the publisher's marketing department, targeting the larger, inexperienced/unsophisticated market segment that seeks instant (7 weeks!!!) results. The schedules in the book prescribe two 7-week phases to achieve the stated 50 pull-ups goals, and a 5-week prep course for the upper-body-strength challenged. However, I doubt the title goal of 50 pull-ups in even 19 weeks is realistic. After 25 years of doing an arduous regime of pull ups (parallel bar dips and push ups) in circuit training format, and never scoring less than a max on the Army physical fitness test, I would be challenged to do 30, much less 50 consecutive pull-ups. Nowhere in the book does Brett Stewart, the author, establish the credibility of his 50 pull-up goal. Something like "after training hundreds of clients in the past 10 years with this program, I've achieved a 95% success rate," is needed. Lacking that, I recommend that the title be changed to something like "The Pull-Up Book".
With that objection out of the way, there is much to be recommended about the book. As the author points out, pull-ups are efficient, and require no special training or significant investment in equipment. The author details what muscles are engaged using pull-ups, the three different grips for pull ups, a 16 page section on variations of advanced pull-ups to target different muscle groups and an excellent, 9 page section on preparing the upper body strength challenged to be able to do the pull-ups. Even the 7-week schedules provide a good training guide, with a useful mix of pull-up variations. Another helpful chapter describes preliminary warm up and stretching exercises.
In summary, good book, lousy title.
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23 of 24 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Change the title, June 7, 2012
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This review is from: 7 Weeks to 50 Pull-Ups: Strengthen and Sculpt Your Arms, Shoulders, Back, and Abs by Training to Do 50 Consecutive Pull-Ups (Paperback)
I have completed the 100 push ups in 7 weeks in the same series, and found the pushup title to be more truthful and possible. I went form about 40 to 102 in 7 weeks so I did prove to myself that I could do it. So I bought this book with similar hopes. . . . . First, 0 to 50 in 7 weeks is probably impossible. I started at 6 and ended up with 16 after 7 weeks; I also found that the jumps in weeks are almost impossible.

Consider that in Week 4 there are sets of 8, 10, 6, 6, 2; then 11, 6, 8, 6, 2; and then finally 10, 10, 10, 2. A hard week for most people; however, the jump to Week Five is very steep: 10, 9, 9, 7, 6; then 11, 10, 9, 7 , 5; and finally 14, 12, 11, 7.

In week 4 about 32 pull ups a session, in week 5 about 41--10 seems like a large amount to bridge in one week (I won't give any more of the program away so don't ask because I do believe that the author has a right to sell his program).

At week 5 I never did get to the final set; I hit 14, 12, 9, 6 after two weeks of repeating the week.

So now that we know 50 in 7 weeks is difficult, if not impossible, why not re-title the book to be honest. I think that 7 months to 50 pull ups, might be possible, if you insist on keeping the 7, but a year would be more realistic; you could divide up the lesson plans into months where the goal is the next increment of 5 or 10. Three weeks on, one week rest/taper with a final pull up test at the end.

Something like: 10, 20, 30, 35, 40, 45, and finally 50.

Maybe I'll write the next version of this book because the above sounds like an honest and legit idea to me. I'm starting my own program tomorrow.
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63 of 76 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good program, but not for beginners..., June 6, 2011
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This review is from: 7 Weeks to 50 Pull-Ups: Strengthen and Sculpt Your Arms, Shoulders, Back, and Abs by Training to Do 50 Consecutive Pull-Ups (Paperback)
Let me start by saying this might have been my misunderstanding of the title, but...

I bought this book with the idea it would help beginners (those who can't even do pull-ups) learn how to get there by "streghthening and sculpting your arms, shoulders, back, and abs". I didn't realize the book is pretty much dedicated to those who can already do pull-ups.

There is an appendix in the back with a program on how to help, but its a very short section. I was expecting to see a program dedicated to actually working up strength within the muscles required to do pull-ups and working from there to the 50 consecutive pull-ups.

Overall I think the book is great for those who know how to do the exercise, but it doesn't help me much since I can't do pull-ups yet.
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44 of 53 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Misleading and No Physiological Basis, Do Not Buy, August 17, 2011
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This review is from: 7 Weeks to 50 Pull-Ups: Strengthen and Sculpt Your Arms, Shoulders, Back, and Abs by Training to Do 50 Consecutive Pull-Ups (Paperback)
The first red flag of this book is that the author has no intention of training you to do 50-pull ups, let alone 50 pull-ups in seven weeks.

The book is broken into two seven week periods. The first period is to take you from 5-6 to 20.

The second period is to take you to 50.

However, accepting this deception, there are more lies. The author consistently warns you not to be discouraged if you cant do 20 after the first 7 weeks and more importantly warns you not to be discouraged if you don't perform 50 consecutive pull-ups. What is the point of the book, mind you?

The author recommends at least 1 minute between sets initially and then at least 90 secs. If you cant complete the sets, he recommends longer rests. How the reader is supposed to know the rest between sets required to perform this new program is not addressed.

Additionally, there is no physiological explanation behind the programming, the rep count, or the rest intervals. Some basic warnings are given about high rep exercises and that is about the extent of any "physiological-sounding" background.

Background:
I used the Texas method to get my 1 rep max pull up to 135lbs. Though I had done no high rep pull up training in weeks I could perform 22 consecutive pull-ups. Therefore I started on the second 7-week period. I was skeptical when the first set one day was 26 and then after a weekend of rest the first set of the next workout was 30. (Did not happen.) It is unlikely a novice will add 4 pull ups between workouts, let alone someone with a background in training.

Bottom Line:
Good marketing, because I bought it. Waste of money because it is not based in reality.
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45 of 58 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The step-by-step method to master the power of pull-ups, May 31, 2011
This review is from: 7 Weeks to 50 Pull-Ups: Strengthen and Sculpt Your Arms, Shoulders, Back, and Abs by Training to Do 50 Consecutive Pull-Ups (Paperback)
The step-by-step method to master the power of pull-ups

This is a fantastic book. The information and instructions are incredible. One of the first things I learned --- and was most grateful to learn --- is that if you have injured or painful shoulders or rotator cuff issues, you should not use a wide grip. That one piece of information probably saved me a whole lot of trouble.

So now I'm using a safe narrow grip.

The author begins the book by explaining what a pull-up is. Most people think they know. But it's a bit more than they think. It's pulling yourself up using your own body weight using an overhand (not underhand) grip. An underhand grip is called a chin-up and it works different muscles.

Then the author explains the advantages of the pull-up, the muscles worked. The pull-up is very much a compound exercise and works the entire upper body and core. It works the deltoids, biceps, triceps, traps and lats. And, it works the core.

The next chapter gives some interesting information about the military requirements for pull-ups. But, don't let that fool you. Pull-ups are for any age and either sex. The author makes sure you know that.

You're told how to warm up before doing your pull-ups and then how to stretch afterwards. You're given safety information as well. I was impressed with how carefully and fully the author laid out the entire program and all the details about pull-ups.

You'll discover how to start at zero. First, test yourself to see where you should begin. If you're a rank beginner and scared of pull-ups (like many people are) you'll find out how to begin doing very easy exercises and work yourself up. That's the only way to accomplish anything.

I started with lat pull downs with a band and also the Australian pull-up.

The author tells you to start at home. Forget the gym. "It's very intimidating to hop on a pull-up bar at a gym and work on a set," he says. He adds, "I do pull-ups three to four days a week and I still sometimes feel uneasy. Pick up an inexpensive pull-up bar that you can hang in a doorway and practice at home until you're comfortable."

He says you can use a chair or bands for assistance but focus on the workout and don't worry about others watching you.

The 7 Weeks to 50 Pull-Ups program is truly for anyone. The author says that by working at your own pace, you'll get through the program.

This is a very short book but it's long on information and enjoyment. It's an easy read with lots of helpful pictures and instructions. You'll be doing 50 pull-ups before you know it if you follow the instructions in this book.

What's more, you'll get the great benefits, both functional and aestheticly, that pull-ups provide.

Highly recommended.

-- Susanna K. Hutcheson
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Caveat Emptor, March 18, 2012
By 
W. Frayne (Huntsville AL) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: 7 Weeks to 50 Pull-Ups: Strengthen and Sculpt Your Arms, Shoulders, Back, and Abs by Training to Do 50 Consecutive Pull-Ups (Paperback)
I would not have purchased this pamphlet ( 118 pages heavily laden with photos) if I had physically seen it first. It has no training guidance other than "Hey , you want to do more pull ups? Then just try to do more pull ups". There are no alternate training methods such as weights, or ropes. The goals the author sets for weekly gains in his 7 week programs are unrealistic for the beginner. Save your money!
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24 of 30 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not any new information or informative, July 2, 2011
By 
Parth Vasa (Sunnyvale, CA, USA) - See all my reviews
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I bought it expecting it have routines specifically designed to strengthen upper body. The gist of this book is just start with few pull ups and then do more. Whats so informative about that?
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40 of 52 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Title sets unreasonable goals, July 19, 2011
By 
R. Allen (Stanford, CA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: 7 Weeks to 50 Pull-Ups: Strengthen and Sculpt Your Arms, Shoulders, Back, and Abs by Training to Do 50 Consecutive Pull-Ups (Paperback)
50 consecutive pull-ups is close to impossible. The world record for pull-ups in a minute is 54. 50 was only broken a couple of years ago. This number is not about speed as much as it is about the ability to do consecutive pull-ups without rest. After years of lifting weights, I can do between 43 and 48 (depending on the day) and I'm ridiculously strong. Do not expect to do 50 pull-ups at the end of any 7 week program. Unless maybe if the program included steroid use.
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