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Weetamoo: Heart of the Pocassets, Massachusetts - Rhode Island, 1653 (The Royal Diaries) Hardcover – August 27, 2011


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 7 - 10 years
  • Grade Level: 2 - 5
  • Lexile Measure: 1050L (What's this?)
  • Hardcover: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Scholastic Press; 1st edition (September 1, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0439129109
  • ISBN-13: 978-0439129107
  • Product Dimensions: 7.7 x 5.4 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #647,711 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 4-7-Using a diary format, Smith describes Weetamoo's life as a young teen in Massachusetts and Rhode Island in 1653. Constantly struggling with gender roles, she wants to hunt, and challenges boys to contests of skill. She surreptitiously follows her father as he meets with the Coat-men, or white settlers, at Plimoth Plantation. Eventually, she goes through a coming-of-age ceremony that involves a sweat lodge, fasting, and visions that foretell of later conflicts between the settlers and the Native Americans. Before the narrative comes to an abrupt end, she has matured into a future leader, or sachem, of the Pocasset tribe. A foreword explains that the real Weetamoo could not read or write, and would never have kept a diary. In the novel, Weetamoo makes line drawings on birchbark to illustrate her points, and often ponders learning to write as she observes the Coat-men, but she is not willing to convert to Christianity to do so. The final 50 pages provide further factual information, and readers may find Weetamoo's adult life more interesting than the fictionalized account of her youth. Michael Dorris's Morning Girl (Hyperion, 1992) provides a more original portrayal of early Native Americans.
Debbie Whitbeck, West Ottawa Public Schools, Holland, MI
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

Gr. 5-8. The latest addition to the Royal Diaries series explores the everyday life of a 14-year-old Wampanoag girl in the mid-1600s. The oldest daughter of Corbitant, sachem of the Pocasset band of the Wampanoag Nation, Weetamoo was born around 1641. Aspiring to be sachem after her father, Weetamoo struggles with her impatience while trying to learn the skills that she will need to lead her people, and she attempts to understand the visions of "bitter wars" that come to her during her spiritual fasts. Filled with details of daily life, this "diary" offers a comprehensive look at seventeenth-century Wampanoag culture, including the tribe's disagreements over how best to deal with the white-skinned "Coat-men." A foreword explains more about the Wampanoag, and endnotes offer detailed information about Weetamoo's family and her later life, interactions between the pilgrims and the Wampanoag. A glossary, illustrations, and maps are included, as well. The author, part Algonquin of Micmac descent, has translated her long fascination with Weetamoo into a lively yet ultimately tragic tale that vividly evokes the time period. Karen Hutt
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
5 star
57%
4 star
29%
3 star
14%
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See all 21 customer reviews
I highly recommend Weetamoo's story to all Royal Diaries fans.
Rebecca Herman
Either way, this cultural glimpse into our native history is welcome and a wonderful read for both adults and children.
Amazon Customer
Weetamoo lives a simple, carefree life in her Pocasette Tribe, playing with friends and finding love.
Toni Masters

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 23 people found the following review helpful By "royaldiaryfan2000" on September 5, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Finally! After all of the Royal Diaries fans across the nation anxiously waited for the publication of Weetamoo for over two years it's finally here!
This diary covers the teenage years of Weetamoo, the oldest daughter of the sachem of the Pocasset Native Americans, Corbitant, but basically it focuses on the turbulent changes that Weetamoo goes through that will affect her deply when she inherits the role of sachem over the Pocassets. This diary was special in this appraised series. As the author frequently composes, Weetamoo did not write. The Pocassets put their stories down in wampum belts or birchbark pictures. But mostly they handed down their stories orally. In this case, we dive into Weetamoo's thoughts because her imposing father quietly asks his daughter to find some peace and quiet time during her days and reflect with herself, as she is rowdy and wild, and she must learn to contain herself in order to become a true Pocasset sachem. Through almost 150 pages of Weetamoo's thoughts and little birchbark pictures that she composes to keep a memory of her thoughts (and struggles to hide them) we see Weetamoo's daily life. This is what is also special about this diary. Most of the other diaries describe lessons and balls and diplomacy. However, this diary showed the spirit of an average kid. Weetamoo played with her friends, she talked about boys and other things a teenage girl would talk about with her best friend Cedar, who is also destined to become a sachem, and she of course has to do household chores with her mother and her younger sister, Wootenasuke. There are a few funny moments throughout the diary, and Weetamoo's style and voice is much like that of kids today.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Rebecca Herman HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on September 5, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Fourteen-year-old Weetamoo is the oldest daughter of Corbitant, sachem to the Pocasset band of the Wampanoag Nation. Even though she is a girl, Weetamoo is the one who will inherit her father's position someday. But it's 1653, and her tribe's home in what is now Massachusetts and Rhode Island is changing forever. The settlements of the English "Coat-men" are expanding onto the Pocassets' territory, and Weetamoo wonders what will be left once she becomes her people's leader. Over nearly a year, Weetamoo describes her life as the seasons change and she undergoes a ritual fast and vision quest. There has been a long wait for this book in the Royal Diaries series to be released, but I am glad to say it's as good as I expected. I highly recommend Weetamoo's story to all Royal Diaries fans.
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19 of 22 people found the following review helpful By "royaldiaryfan2000" on July 4, 2002
Format: Hardcover
Even though this book is said to have never been published, I finally found a copy of it.This is the story of the young Indian girl named Weetamoo. She is the daughter of the chief of the Pocasset Indians, who once lived in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. In her new diary, Weetamoo tells of her Indian life, the colonies that are now threatening her land, and the brewing war between the colonists and the Indians, that would soon become known as King Philip's War, in which Weetamoo would drown in as she tried to escape when she was an adult. Other than the dark subjects of this story, you are also introduced to Indian life. The rituals that the young girls take, the food,clothing, houses, all of the pieces of survival are seen here but in a different kind of way. While the other Royal Diaries' princesses live in big luxurious mansions and chateaus and palaces, Weetamoo lives in a small tribe of long houses and other Indian homes. I thought this book was exceptionally good. It lives up to the best of the Royal Diaries-it shows Weetamoo's true character, her teenage life, how she used her head to deal with things, and how she is to deal with her father's preparations for her to marry. Weetamoo had quite a life , but she enjoyed it. I would say anyone who is a true fan of the Royal Diaries should read this, don't just buy it to complete your collection, which I have all 12 now(and I'm now awaiting Jahanara). the first few pages are boring and there are some dull moments every now and then, but, hey, maybe her life really was dull and boring, that's what the Royal Diaries are about-bringing boring princesses to life. This book includes an epilogue, a historical note, pictures, and a family tree, all in the back.Read more ›
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18 of 21 people found the following review helpful By "royaldiaryfan2000" on January 6, 2003
Format: Hardcover
To everyone that cannot find a copy of this book or wnats to find a copy of it--don't worry. Weetamoo was published in June of 2001 but was very rare to find and less than a month after it was published, all copies of the book were taken back to Scholastic, Inc. to be revised and edited. Weetamoo has been re-written and edited and will be published by this fall according to Carolyn Meyer--another Royal Diaries author who is friends with Patricia Clark Smith.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on January 10, 2003
Format: Hardcover
I just recently found out about this book. I want it because I love these books and am collecting everyone that comes out. I was looking to find more info on Weetamoo& came across an interesting site. It was a site for like Dear America Upcoming Books and Spoilers. There was a section in it for the Royal Diares Series and one of the upcoming books to look foward to is Catherine the Great, by Kristiana Gregory(should come out in 2004). Other than the long wait, it's something any Royal Diaries fan will want to read when it's out. Well just to let ya know. Bye!
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