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Welcome Home

13 customer reviews

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Audio CD, February 28, 2012
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$9.79
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$9.79 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details Temporarily out of stock. Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we ship the item. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

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Editorial Reviews

First time on CD for this 1978 album from the iconic singer, songwriter and performer. While Carole King was one of the most prolific and successful songwriters of the '60s, she didn't release a bona-fide solo album until 1970. Nobody could have predicted that her 1971 sophomore solo album, Tapestry, would become one of the biggest selling and most influential albums of all time. While the albums that followed in it's wake are certainly more than worthy of your time, they didn't achieve the same success and have largely been forgotten.

1. Main Street Saturday Night
2. Sunbird
3. Venusian Diamond
4. Changes
5. Morning Sun
6. Disco Tech
7. Wings Of Love
8. Ride The Music
9. Everybody's Got The Spirit
10. Welcome Home

Product Details

  • Audio CD (February 28, 2012)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Rockingale
  • ASIN: B006MU323E
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #152,018 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 18 people found the following review helpful By M. Mendenhall on December 16, 2007
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Carole King wasn't selling a lot of records when she released Welcome Home. Much of the collection is not unpleasant typical Carole King introspective piano ballads.

Three songs make the CD worth owning. Main Street Saturday Night has a great FM 70s groove with some nice guitar and atmosphere. Morning Sun builds enough emotionally to the chorus that it rises above standard fare. And Venusian Diamond stands out as one of King's most interesting recordings. It is Beatlesque from the word go and its moody atmosphere is top notch (like the Beatlesque Speeding Time a few years later).

Main Street Saturday Night and Venusian Diamond both let King's band take center stage. It is a little surprising - and kind of cool - to associate these rock grooves to King. Here you have two rock gems and one pop gem to add to King's catalog.

Very rare and unknown Carole King LP. Shortly after the recording of this LP, King's husband and musical partner died, sort of taking the wind out of the sails (and sales) of the LP's release.
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13 of 16 people found the following review helpful By L. Huff on December 30, 2007
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
The first thing I should mention is that this CD is advertised as having a bonus track, which it does not. That was very disappointing considering the price of the CD. I think it is false advertising and should be corrected by Amazon. Although Welcome Home was not a "hit" when it first came out in 1978, it does have some of very good songs. The best songs on the CD are Everybody's got the Spirit, Ride the Music, Venusian Diamond, Morning Sun and Main Street Saturday Night. Lyrically and musically, these songs are optimistic and upbeat, which may be too sugar coated for some people. The expectation when looking at the album cover might be that it is an album of Mountain Songs. It really isn't (although the title track was written about her Idaho ranch). It is quite a mix of styles, including disco, folk/country, pop and rock.
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7 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Lee Armstrong HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on January 26, 2008
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
It's wonderful to have Carole King's "Welcome Home" album on CD, thanks to this Japanese pressing. The cardboard sleeve is a little larger than the standard CD shape and makes this release unique. Most regard this album as a failure because it did not generate hits and had poor sales. The set was recorded in January 1978. Rick Evers who was Carole's husband died of a drug overdose on March 21 of that year, which clouded the album's release in May. For Carole King fans, there are reasons to cheer. "Venusian Diamond" may have been a homage to the Beatles, but is a strong song with one of Carole's dreamiest melodies, "Then there appeared a serpent hanging like a thunder rope. He said, "Pull me." I did & fell into the wrong end of a telescope." "Morning Sun" is a lovely track with Richard Hardy's flute giving a sunny cheerful feel to the arrangement and Carole in fine voice, "In the morning the sun comes shining through my window & it's good to be alive." "Ride the Music" is also a delightful track that sounds like a carnival ride with Hardy's clarinet solo. I'm sorry this album is so overlooked because it still sounds great to my ears. Enjoy!
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Format: Audio CD
By the time the 70's drew to a close,the singer/songwriter movement was shinning it's brightest just before it petered out as a commercially dominant genre during the 1980's. And creatively it even stuck around then because it was very flexible. Like the blues,it's emphasis on the material as opposed to instrumental innovations had the effect of making it more flexible TO innovations. Carole King was one of the matters of that little musical irony. And though the perception was likely by this time that she didn't have another classic album in her anymore? The music still remained within her and was just as antsy to get out there.

"Main Street Saturday Night" opens the album with a slow crawling,Stonsy rocker yet again-something King seemed to have an affinity for in her late 70's music. "Sunbird" is a pretty and sweet Calypso percussion tinged mid-tempo melody while songs like the East Indian/Arabic/sitar based psychedelia of "Venusian Diamond" and the music hall based piano pop of "Ride The Music" shwocase King's inner Beatles to wonderful affect. The acoustic guitar based uptempo "Morning Sun" and the piano based soulful shuffle of "Everybody's Got The Spirit" really embody the uptempo end of singer/songwriter pop/rock while "Wings Of Love" and the title song go for the epic ballad style of her previous album. "Disco Tech" finds King taking an extremely soulful,funkified take on the disco era with heavily reverbed,phat basslines and a percussion rhythm.

From what I've heard of it? This might very well be Carole King's finest album on the purely creative level from her lesser heralded latter 70's period. It covers a lot of ground.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By hyperbolium on March 18, 2012
Format: Audio CD
Carole King's second album for Capitol was originally released in 1978, and is now being reissued on her own Rockingale imprint with its original track list and an eight-page booklet that includes liner notes, lyrics, photos and album art. The songwriting continued her work with then-third-husband Rick Evers, who co-wrote two of the titles, and also continued King's weakening commercial success. The album scratched just below the Hot 100, and a lone single ("Morning Sun") just missed the A/C Top 40. As on her Capitol debut, Simple Things, King's songs are incredibly optimistic, perhaps sparked by the communal living she and Evers had set up. Evers died, reportedly of a heroin overdose, a few months after the album was recorded, so the album's sunny vibe was thrown into shadow by the songwriter's loss.

King reaches back to the Brill Building for the cruisin' themed "Main Street Saturday Night," but it doesn't crackle with the authenticity of her earlier work, and Evers' new-agey lyrics for "Sun Bird" must have seemed deep at the time, but don't hold a candle to the expressiveness of even King's lesser works. Even stranger is the catchy "Venusian Diamond," which combines late-60s Beatleisms with the too-clean studio sounds that marked many productions of the era. Even that's explainable compared to the bandwagon "Disco Tech," though even here you get the sense that King has a deeper sense of music's primordial hold on the soul than many of the hacks writing disco at the time.

A more conventional pop expression of her love is heard in "Ride the Music," and the following "Everybody's Got the Spirit" continues the community theme which closed her previous album in "One.
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