Wendell Berry: Life and Work (Culture of the Land) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $21.95
  • Save: $3.10 (14%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 5 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Good | Details
Sold by Kwik Finds
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Clean Pages - No Markings or Highlighting. Minor Shelf wear. Marking on edge of book.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Wendell Berry: Life and Work (Culture of the Land) Paperback – June 11, 2010


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$18.85
$10.78 $8.50
12%20Days%20of%20Deals%20in%20Books


Frequently Bought Together

Wendell Berry: Life and Work (Culture of the Land) + Wendell Berry and the Cultivation of Life: A Reader's Guide
Price for both: $38.45

Buy the selected items together
If you buy a new print edition of this book (or purchased one in the past), you can buy the Kindle Edition for FREE. Print edition purchase must be sold by Amazon. Learn more.


Holiday Deals in Books
Holiday Deals in Books
Find deals for every reader in the Holiday Deals in Books store, featuring savings of up to 50% on cookbooks, children's books, literature & fiction, and more.

Product Details

  • Series: Culture of the Land
  • Paperback: 368 pages
  • Publisher: The University Press of Kentucky; Reprint edition (June 11, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0813192579
  • ISBN-13: 978-0813192574
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.8 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.9 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #463,482 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

""This is a superb collection. Berry is one of America's greatest social critics, essayists, and poets, and the grand simplicity and unity of his life and thoughts emerges from the fascinating details of his personal history, captured beautifully in the words of his friends." --David Ehrenfeld, author of The Arrogance of Humanism and Swimming Lessons: Ke" --



""Though the 'characters' herein are real people, there is magic in this book that rivals the best of Wendell Berry's writings. Over and over we see solitary readers grappling with Berry's art and thought amid struggles and in places unknown to the author. The magic is that they receive direction and succor even so. The loving reciprocity of these 'What I've Gained from Wendell' tales is so natural yet powerful it brings to mind planting and harvesting. The integrity-filled life, poetic depth, devastating prophesies, and superlative prose of Mr. Berry long ago achieved a consistency that verges on the relentless. To see his good work gently rise from the page, years and miles later, to touch lives he has not imagined in ways he has not foreseen, converts this near relentlessness into simple grace." --David James Duncan, author of The Brothers K" --



""I can't think of any subject matter more timely, and timeless, than the suite of ideas that Wendell Berry has championed over the years. While giving thoughtful attention to those ideas, this anthology also offers rare insight into the person behind the words. Like the unmistakable laugh of Mr. Berry himself, it is sure to leave readers both invigorated, and basking in the grace of this gentle, wise man." --Jennifer Sahn, editor of Orion magazine" --



""[A] stimulating collection. Berry has long deserved such a masterful collection as this. Peters' volume does what the best of the collections always do: It drives us to pick up Berry's writings and read them over and over again." --Henry L. Carrigan, Jr., Charlotte Observer" --



""The essays collected by Peters unearth a simplicity and unity beneath Berry's complex surface, proffering a source of inspiration for those seeking to live life better and encouraging audiences to forsake worldly consumerism in favor of consumption of Berry's words." --Kentucky Monthly" --



""If it is true that we live lives of noisy desperation, prone to the seductions of fashion and to the 'thrall of our appetites,' we could do worse than to hear a voice that offers an alternative. Wendell Berry: Life and Work is a rewarding way to begin listening to such a voice." --Paul Doerksen, Winnipeg Free Press" --



""The most comprehensive single source evaluating Berry and his impact." --Whitney Hale, UK News" --



""Pairing literary criticism with more personal work, Peters' volume does a remarkable jobn connecting the dots between Berry's physical labors and his intellectual ones." --The Post and Courier (online)" --



""This appreciation of Berry by friends and colleagues is a fitting tribute to a man whose writing truly has the power to change lives." --Carmichael's Bookstore Catalog" --



""Those who admire Berry's work will want to pick up this book even if they may already own some of its contents, because there is no other single volume that paints so complete a portrait of this remarkable man." --Scott P. Richert, The University Bookman" --



""Anyone undertaking a serious study of Berry will want this book. Those familiar with only one of his genres will find it a helpful introduction to the full range of his writing and activism." --Lisa Woolley, Bloomsburg Review" --



""The wonderful thing about this collection of essays is that it demonstrates just how varied and far-reaching Berry's influence has been and how meaningful his work is to his readers in so many different ways." --Resurgence" --



""Taken in sum, these essays illuminate the life and work of one of America's most provocative native thinkers in which the reader senses what the subject professes he lives." --Richard Taylor, The Register of the Kentucky Historical Society" --



""Shuman and Owens... presents articles based on how the work of author Wendell Berry can be interpreted in the context of living a true Christian life." --Book News Inc." --



""[The contributors] discuss [Berry's] placing community and interaction for the common good over the centralization of the work and life of the world." --Mary Popham, Courier-Journal.com" --



""A broad collection of writers examines the famous Kentucky agrarian writer's work through a series of essays." --Lexington Herald-Leader" --



""This collection is a must-read, must-own….It is filled with the richness of writings from the essayists who delineate not only Wendell Berry's great works, but give us a glimpse of the man, one of Kentucky's greatest wonders." --Mary Popham, Louisville Courier-Journal" --



""This is a remarkable collection for reference and reflection."--Mary Popham, The Courier Journal" --



""This collection of essays put together by editor Jason Petes are written by 27 scholars, activists, and fellow authors that 'unite considreations on Berry's thinking, friendships, and labor.'...[It] is perhaps as good a glance inside the soul of Wendell Berry as one could hope for." -- Modern Mountain Magazine" --



""Not only reminds us why it is such a pleasure to read Wendell Berry's work...but it further compels readers to take seriously the implications of his work for their own lives and in their own communities. In doing so, it serves to extend the already considerable reach of Berry's legacy."--Journal of Agriculture and Human Values" --



"In many ways, this collection reads like a tribute to Wendell Berry and through this tribute the authors lead the reader into Berry's thoughts on community, responsibility, and fidelity and these qualities are the yardsticks of happiness. One of the points driven home by this collection is that one should not consider the writingsof Wendell Berry without also considering his life, and thus the title of this collection is appropriate. -- Jacob Jones, University of Florida" -- Jacob Jones

From the Inside Flap

Essayist, social critic, poet, "mad farmer," novelist, teacher, and prophet: Wendell Berry has been called many things, but the broad sweep of his contemporary relevance and influence defies facile labels. With his unique perspective and far-reaching vision, Berry poses complex questions about humankind and our relationship to the land and offers simple but profound solutions. Berry's essays, novels, and poems give voice to a provocative but consistent philosophy, one that extends far beyond its agrarian core to include elements of sociology, the natural sciences, politics, religion, philosophy, linguistics, agriculture, and other seemingly incompatible fields of study. Wendell Berry: Life and Work examines this wise and original thinker, appraising his written work and exploring his influence as an activist and artist. Jason Peters has assembled a broad variety of writers including Hayden Carruth, Sven Birkerts, Barbara Kingsolver, Stanley Hauerwas, Donald Hall, Ed McClanahan, Bill McKibben, Scott Russell Sanders, Norman Wirzba, Wes Jackson, and Eric T. Freyfogle. Each contributor examines an aspect of Berry's varied yet cohesive body of work. Also included are highly personal glimpses of Wendell Berry: his career, academic influence, and unconventional lifestyle.

These deft sketches of Berry show the purity of his agrarian lifestyle and demonstrate that there is nothing simple about the life to which he has devoted himself. He embraces a life that sustains him not by easy purchase and haste but by physical labor and patience, not by mindless acquiescence to a centralized economy but by careful attention to local ways and wisdom.

Wendell Berry: Life and Work combines biographical sketches, personal accounts, literary criticism, and social commentary. Together, the contributors illuminate Berry as he is: a complex man of place and community with an astonishing depth of domestic, intellectual, filial, and fraternal attributes. The result is a rich portrait of one of America's most profound and honest thinkers.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
4
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 5 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Kathleen Nicastro on September 3, 2007
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
For those who have the privilege of knowing him as a friend, this book
provides additional personal glimpses into the life of the man and his
passionate friendships, as well as revealing the nature of his work as
understood by his colleagues and associates in the fields of agriculture,
poetry, and the art of the essay. For those who have never met him, nor
perhaps ever heard of him, this gem of a book will give them some of
the essence of what he and his work stand for, and will make them want to
seek out the primary texts for themselves. An entertaining and well-
meant tribute to a man who has not only contributed greatly to American
letters, but has turned the ordinary toward the holy (as it was meant
to be) once again.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Patricia Kramer on January 15, 2008
Format: Hardcover
I most treasured the personal essays in this book and frankly skimmed or skipped over the more scholarly pieces. What becomes clear in this book is how many people's lives and careers have been influenced by Wendell Berry, the professor, the farmer, the poet, the philosopher, the writer, and the friend. I thank Jason Peters for this book and particularly the essays by Wes Jackson, Barbara Kingsolver, Hayden Carruth, and Gene Logsdon and for the wonderful pictures.

Her is a delightful quote from the essay by Donald Hall, a fellow poet, farmer and teacher.
"Another thing we had in common was good, solid, loving, and companionate marriages. On one of our car trips, I complained over the useless, trivial hyperactivity of my eyes gazing at women, At any conference, or in an airport on the way, I find myself continually checking out the beauty of young women, dwelling on figures and faces. It disturbed me that I wasted time and energy evaluating quarries I would never mine. Wendell agreed explosively, as if he had been waiting for someone to bring up the subject. He suffered from this idle habit himself, and found himself in lecture halls doing inventories of the female audience. One day, he told me, he saw one face that was absolutely perfect and irresistible to him. It was a few seconds before he realized that his eyes had lighted on his wife, Tanya."
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By toronto on January 11, 2008
Format: Hardcover
As with all things associated with Wendell, this book of gatherings is well worth a reader's time -- peaceable rantings is a pretty good description. The most interesting article in the book is, ironically, Eric Freyvogel's, which more or less eviscerates the rugged individualist stance that does occasionally creep into Berry's world -- in spite of the ever-present language of community.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Joyce on October 25, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Wendell Berry is a farmer, a writer of poetry, essays, and novels, and a wise man. Reading about him is not as good as reading what he wrote, but with this book you can gain perspective on the man and his work, learn what he is like personally from his longtime friends - and most of the contributors to this volume are fine writers. The list of about 30 includes Bill McKibben, Wes Jackson, and Barbara Kinsolver.

Maybe you haven't heard of Wendell Berry. There is some discussion in the book of the fact that he is not a household name. However, there are those who believe that this man may be remembered by history as "the single most important and influential political thinker alive today." One states he is important "because although he is not alone in calling for change in the world, he is one of the few whose ideas can touch us at the deepest level of our being; one of the few who is telling us that change must come from the depths of our relationship with nature and ourselves." I was introduced to Berry's writing in the 80s when our small group studied his classic 1977 book, The Unsettling of America, a life-changing experience. I went on to explore his novels beginning with the wondrous, A Place on Earth. Here is a quote from Unsettling that is discussed in this volume: "Once the revolution of exploitation is under way, statesmanship and craftsmanship are gradually replaced by salesmanship -- the craft of persuading people to buy what they do not need, and do not want, for more than it is worth."

Bill McKibben deals with Berry as a citizen of the world. He says that reading Berry is like reading the Gospels in that Berry sees that one's real joy is possible when one takes up one's responsibility -- to the land, to your neighbors, and forward and backward in time.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
This looks like an interesting book of personal reflections, which are in themselves not particularly open to judgment. That being said, one thing we can say is that the book was done before this now highly symbolic figure Wendell Berry changed his mind on gay marriage. I only fairly recently became aware of Berry's great symbolic role for a certain sort of reactionary conservative. When I heard of him first long ago it was just as a sort of quirky novelist, whose books I was not drawn to reading. But it was not just for conservative reactionaries that I knew him, but for a certain kind of aging hippy in places like Boulder, CO, where I studied for a while. Well, how times change. It seems his image became a mutant of sorts, and perhaps it was just that some of those youngish hippy types decided that reactionary stances fitted their ambitions in life better.

Poor Mr. Berry, I think he probably woke up one day and realized his life had turned into a nightmare. He had gone from being the cool writer for free spirits, to being the lodestar for people who want to bring the Confederacy back, and re-estblish monarchies. As they do on the Front Porch Republic, where a number of his conservative fans hold forth. One of the most egregious of these fans is an infantile thinker named Patrick Deneen who claims to have recently left Georgetown U. for vaunted reasons of grand principle. They are just too-too liberal there, and he took his ball and moved to South Bend. Ah, the Imperial City is a small town. From what I have heard, that is not really how things happened. When push comes to shove, the only importance of the man and his petty trajectory is that he keeps on writing in the most offensive and smarmy ways about gay people and their lives.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?