Industrial-Sized Deals TextBTS15 Shop Women's Handbags Learn more nav_sap_plcc_6M_fly_beacon Melanie Martinez Fire TV Stick Off to College Essentials Find the Best Purina Pro Plan for Your Pet Shop Popular Services tmnt tmnt tmnt  Amazon Echo Starting at $99 Kindle Voyage Metal Gear Solid 5 Shop Back to School with Amazon Back to School with Amazon Outdoor Recreation Deal of the Day
Buy New
$15.49
Qty:1
  • List Price: $17.99
  • You Save: $2.50 (14%)
& FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
West of Zanzibar has been added to your Cart
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for up to $2.53
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • West of Zanzibar
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

West of Zanzibar

11 customer reviews

>
Additional DVD options Amazon Price New from Used from
DVD
"Please retry"
1-Disc Version
$15.49
$12.79 $14.77
Watch Instantly with Rent Buy
DVD-R Note: This product is manufactured on demand when ordered from Amazon.com. [Learn more]

Unlimited Streaming with Amazon Prime
Unlimited Streaming with Amazon Prime Start your 30-day free trial to stream thousands of movies & TV shows included with Prime. Start your free trial
$15.49 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

West of Zanzibar + The Blackbird + Where East is East
Price for all three: $41.47

Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

Revenge is a dish best served cold in director Tod Browning's lurid tale of love and vengeance starring Lon Chaney, Lionel Barrymore and Mary Nolan. When his dying wife returns with a baby girl a year after leaving him for Crane (Barrymore), the ivory trader who crippled him, a Limehouse magician named Phroso (Chaney) vows to get even. Placing the baby in a Zanzibar brothel, Phroso spends the next 18 years living with cannibals while he waits for the child to come of age. Summoning the debauched young woman to his jungle lair, Phroso plans to reunite the girl with her long-lost father, after which he'll order the natives to kill the trader and burn Crane's daughter alive!

This product is manufactured on demand using DVD-R recordable media. Amazon.com's standard return policy will apply.


Special Features

None.

Product Details

  • Actors: Lon Chaney, Lionel Barrymore, Mary Nolan
  • Directors: Tod Browning
  • Format: NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Region: All Regions
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: Warner Archive
  • DVD Release Date: May 24, 2012
  • Run Time: 65 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B007XTDWS8
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #37,574 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

23 of 28 people found the following review helpful By a movie fan on May 17, 2012
Format: DVD
This has shown several times on TCM. It is a classic of outre cinema, and I highly recommend it. It is a real pity Warner is not releasing a real DVD of this film. A DVD-R has half the quality, and you can burn your own copy for virtually nothing and it will be just as good. Sad, really, how many great movies are suddenly being released (at high cost) in this degraded format. WB isn't the only offender, but it is the most aggressive at doing this. Shame on them.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Crimson Ghost on October 29, 2012
Format: DVD
Films by Todd Browning have this unnatural feeling to them. He creates worlds filled with characters and situations that are on the verge of belief. Yet, with the outstanding skills of actors like Chaney, Lugosi, Barrymore and others, they become believable and overly enjoyable to watch. Browning's worlds are filled with vampires, freak show denizens, a ventriloquist jewel thief who disguises as an old woman operating a pet a shop, a midget thief who disguises as a baby, a gorilla kept as a pet in a cage. West of Zanzibar is no exception to Browning's collection of other worlds. In West, Chaney plays a cripple who travels to Africa and takes up with an imaginary tribe of cannibals with an unusual custom of burning alive the wife and daughters of deceased men, all to play out a 20 year plan of revenge. His scheme of revenge eventually turns on him in a highly predictable ending. I loved it, had a grin on my face throughout the entire film. This film is not to be missed by fans of Chaney, Browning or films of the bizarre. Browning was the Tim Burton of his time.

The film is not restored but it is likely the best that is out for this title.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Jonathan on May 29, 2012
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
So I actually love this movie. Tod Browning is one of my favorite filmmakers. Everyone remembers "Dracula" and "Freaks" but his work with Lon Chaney, Sr. was just as special. "The Unknown," "The Unholy Three," and "West of Zanzibar" are some of my favorites. The picture is old and it's not cleaned up to look pristine, but it's still a pretty decent picture. The product is also DVD-R so it's exactly DVD, but it'll do. There are no special features or chapter selection options. Not even a booklet. I would rate the movie 5 stars, but the DVD itself just doesn't have what you want on it. I understand why though: this is still a rather forgotten movie and not many people care, but it's really a lot of fun. Chaney gives a great performance as a crazed paraplegic witchdoctor in Africa (he moved there to get revenge on Lionel Barrymore after he was injured following a magic act he was performing). It's interesting to see Chaney bound to a wheelchair while Barrymore walks around. I got so used to seeing him in a wheelchair from "Key Largo" and "It's a Wonderful Life." Great movie, sub-par DVD release, but fans of Chaney and Browning really ought to check it out if they haven't. It's great jungle melodrama fun from the silent era.
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By THE BLUEMAHLER on March 19, 2013
Format: DVD
West of Zanzibar (1928) is missing some footage, but, unlike the earlier The Road to Mandalay, it is in much more viewable state. Enough of Zanzibar remains intact so as not to appear too fragmentary. Originally tilted Kongo, West of Zanzibar is the most flagrant, delightfully vile of the Browning/Chaney Oedipal absurdities.

Chaney plays Phroso. Phroso is married to Anna (Jacqueline Gadsden) and together they work in a Limehouse music hall as a magic act (in the early scenes as the magician, the protean Chaney gives a remarkable, Chaplin-like performance). Behind Phroso's back, Anna is carrying on an affair with Crane (Lionel Barrymore). When Phroso and Crane inevitably fight over Anna, Phroso falls from a great height, forever crippling himself. After a short time has passed, Phroso is told that his wife has returned to town, with a baby, and is in the local church. The dead-legged Phroso zips down to the church via scooter and crawls into the tabernacle, only to find his wife, with crying babe in arms, collapsed in death, at the feet of a Madonna and child statue. Phroso looks at the baby girl, then at the Madonna, and vows revenge on Crane and the infant.

Twenty years later, Phroso re-emerges as "Dead Legs": a witch doctor and trader, lording over a swamp in Africa, utilizing his cheap parlor tricks to keep the local cannibals in submission. Dead Legs is under the care of the derelict, alcoholic Doc (Warner Baxter) and an assortment of unsavory characters. Using the natives, Dead Legs steals ivory from his nemesis, Crane. It's all part of a twenty year grand scheme for ultimate revenge.

Dead Legs summons Maisie (the beautiful, tragic, and short-lived Mary Nolan). Maisie is the now grown infant, whom Phroso believes to be the child of Anna and Crane.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Dr. James Gardner VINE VOICE on August 11, 2012
Format: DVD
"West of Zanzibar" (1928) teamed two of the biggest stars of the silent era - director Tod Browning and actor Lon Chaney. It was based on a 1926 play called "Kongo".

Tod Browning (1880-1962) was one of the most unusual of all Hollywood directors, and that's saying a lot when you consider the list of characters includes "Wild Bill" Wellman, John Ford, Sam Peckinpah, Alfred Hitchcock, etc.

Browning's peak was in the silent era, when he produced such classics as "the Unholy Three" (1925), "London After Midnight" (1927), and "The Unknown" (1927), but he is best known for the classic "Dracula" (1931) and for "Freaks" (1932). Browning was the first and truest of the American directors to adopt the German expressionist techniques and themes, and he embraced them to such an extent that he outdid the originals.

His films, especially the ones with Chaney, can be hard to watch, since they involve mutilated and deformed people, with themes involving revenge, sexual exploitation, murder, and mayhem. He often set his films in carnival shows (where he had once worked) and often employed carnival acts as part of the plot. Warning - this film is true to Chaney's heritage.

Lon Chaney (1883-1930) was one of the biggest stars of the silent era. Known as "The man of 1000 faces", he was capable of disguising himself completely in service of his roles, which could be as diverse as a hunchback ("Hunchback of Notre Dame"), a legless man ("The Penalty"), an armless man who throws knives with his feet ("The Unknown") or a monster ("Phantom of the Opera"). He enjoyed crime stories and stories that involved circus performers, and he was famous for the 10 films he made with Tod Browning. His life was the subject of the 1957 film "Man of 100 Faces" starring James Cagney.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?