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What Boys Really Want Hardcover – January 1, 2012


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 12 and up
  • Grade Level: 7 and up
  • Lexile Measure: 710L (What's this?)
  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Scholastic Press (January 1, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0545113156
  • ISBN-13: 978-0545113151
  • Product Dimensions: 1.2 x 6 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.5 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #896,389 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Where Hautman’s The Big Crunch (2011) was an aching and soulful romance, this is the flip side: fun, sarcastic, blundering, preposterous, but every bit still a romance. The story is told in the alternating perspectives of two 16-year-old longtime friends, the optimistic, fun-loving Adam and the whip-smart but judgmental Lita. Though Lita dreams of becoming a writer, her romance novel has stalled, and she kills time as the “infamous power blogger” Miz Fitz, who anonymously doles out caustic advice to legions of readers. Adam, meanwhile, stumbles upon an idea to write a straight-talk self-help book for high-school girls, What Boys Want, which borrows liberally from the Miz Fitz site—but who would ever notice, right? True, it’s not the most original setup, but Hautman writes fearlessly from both male and female perspectives with little care about what’s politically correct, and he admirably resists the urge to bring Adam and Lita together as lovers. From the always reliable Hautman, this romance delivers predictable pleasures. Grades 8-11. --Daniel Kraus

Review

Praise for The Big Crunch:

* "Hautman skillfully subverts clichés in this subtle, authentic, hearttugging
exploration of first love, but his sharp-eyed view of high-school social dynamics and the loving
friction between parents and teens on the edge of independence is just as memorable." - Booklist, starred review

"With not a bell or whistle in sight, Hautman manages to write the YA love story of all time: simple, poignant, and very, very real." - VOYA

"A humorous and bittersweet tale of romance and the convoluted, uncertain paths that bring two people together." - Kirkus Reviews

Praise for How to Steal a Car:

* “A sporty, stylish model with peppy acceleration and surprising traction, this will be a sweet ride for readers” – BCCB, starred review

“A sharply observed, subversive coming-of-age tale.” - Kirkus Reviews

More About the Author

Okay, here's some miscellaneous personal info. I'll try to be as brief as possible. I was born in 1952 in Berkeley, California, or so I am told (I don't really remember). At age five I moved to St. Louis Park, Minnesota where I went to Cedar Manor Elementary School (also the alma mater of Al Franken and the Coen brothers, and no, they are not close personal friends of mine) and eventually graduated honor-free from St. Louis Park High School. This is so tedious. Why do you keep reading? For the next seven years I attended the Minneapolis College of Art and Design and the University of Minnesota. Contrary to recent news reports, I did not graduate from either institution. After college I worked various jobs for which I was ill-suited, including sign painter, graphic artist, marketing executive, pineapple slicer, etc. Eventually, having exhausted other options, I decided to write. My first novel, Drawing Dead, was published in 1993. Today, I live with mystery writer and poet Mary Logue in Golden Valley, Minnesota and Stockholm, Wisconsin. We have two small dogs (are you still reading?) named Rene and Jacques. There you have it. Fifty-plus years compressed into a few short paragraphs. Feel free to copy and paste for your book report, but don't tell anybody I suggested it. Need to know more? Check out the FAQs page on my website at http://www.petehautman.com.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Teen Reads on February 24, 2012
Format: Hardcover
What do boys really want? Is it true that they think about sex every seven seconds? Why do they spend more time focusing on what they are eating than the pretty girl who is sitting across the table? And why do they have a need to recklessly endanger themselves while trying to impress others? High-schooler Adam Merchant is pretty sure he knows the answers, or at least where to find them, and he's betting that you'll be willing to spend the $10 to find out once he's published his book. That is, if his best friend Lita Wold will let him.

Lita and Adam don't necessarily agree who had the original idea for the book, but between the both of them, Lita knows that she is the writer. After all, she's the author of a secret blog called Miz Fitz, where readers send in questions dealing with anything and everything related to relationship advice. Lita also has a novel half-written in her desk drawer called Wrathlust Hollow that's waiting to be finished as soon as she can tear herself away from helping her friend Emily with her crush. The more Lita thinks about it, she spends a lot of time helping others with their potential romantic relationships rather than focusing on her own.

Even though Lita swears she's the writer and came up with the idea, Adam is the one actually doing the hard work. He's spent considerable time convincing others to buy his book, sought out his English teacher for help, and even decided that self-publishing was the way to go. The only problem is that Adam isn't sure exactly what to write. It can't be that hard to write about what boys want, but Adam will be forever grateful to Lita for introducing him to the anonymous Miz Fitz's blog for ideas.
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By JJ-Ca$h Money on January 26, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I think you should have made Lita less of a emotionally b**** and more of a girl with fire. And the only trying I didn't like was the part about Lita being scared of Chelsea because she was black. But overall it was a pretty good book
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By Jude on July 14, 2012
Format: Hardcover
~3/5
[Taken from my blog.]

I was surprised by some of the things in this book, in a good and bad way. I liked it alright, but it wasn't quite as good as I was hoping, in some ways.
This book is about two friends, who have known each other forever, and how one of them decides to write a book about what boys really want, while the other has a blog snarkily answering questions related to boys and girls, mostly.
It's told in alternating point of views, for which I was glad, because otherwise it might have only been in Lita's head. And I wasn't a big fan of Lita. She could have been really enjoyable, too, what with having a blog and how her answers were always very entertaining. But instead she was almost always angsty and moody and it got kind of annoying. It might be because I'm not a moody person, especially not aloud, and how she was upset about things for no, or little to no, reason, all the time.
Adam, on the other hand, I really enjoyed. He's pretty much a dumb, clueless, teenage boy, but I still really enjoyed him. He was kind of sweet, and he was trying, and it wasn't really his fault that he was so dumb about how publishing works and why Lita was always mad at him.
The ending is probably my favorite part of the book. Adam was an idiot through most of the book, and Lita was moody, but they both met some pretty sweet special someones, and I wasn't expecting how the relationships between them turned out. It wasn't a typical, boy and girl are friends forever and so of course love each other, even though there were several hints to that that weren't cleared up. Either way, it was actually a pretty good ending.
This was not as good as I was hoping, but I enjoyed it enough, and do plan to read another of Hautman's books.
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