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40 of 41 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Perhaps Invisible But Nonethless Real
This "field guide" provides innovative and yet practical and prudent advice on what, in Beckwith's opinion, must be done to attract, reward, and sustain the loyalty of those to whom one sells...whatever that product, service, or idea may be. Consumers now experience an information, indeed a sensory overload of marketing messages which makes differentiation even more...
Published on February 18, 2003 by Robert Morris

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Over-Reaches and Repeats Material from "Selling the Invisible"
As a follow up book to the excellent "Selling the Invisible," I thought this book fell somewhat short of the mark. It rehashed some warmed over material from "Selling the Invisible." It lingered on some topics - like picking a company name - that I'm not sure were totally germane to the book's title.

There are some excellent sections on the importance of...
Published on July 23, 2008 by Kevin Quinley


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40 of 41 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Perhaps Invisible But Nonethless Real, February 18, 2003
This review is from: What Clients Love: A Field Guide to Growing Your Business (Hardcover)
This "field guide" provides innovative and yet practical and prudent advice on what, in Beckwith's opinion, must be done to attract, reward, and sustain the loyalty of those to whom one sells...whatever that product, service, or idea may be. Consumers now experience an information, indeed a sensory overload of marketing messages which makes differentiation even more difficult now than ever before. Beckwith explains how to penetrate such clutter.
After identifying and then analyzing in detail four "Key Trends," he challenges dozens of widely held beliefs about effective marketing which, in his judgment, have been invalidated by those trends. For example:
* "Word-of-mouth advertising has become the world's most overrated form of marketing." Why? "Our mobility propels us away from [old networks through which to process word-of-mouth communications] and into new cities where everyone seems to come from somewhere else."
* "Cold calls leave people cold." Why? "People feel most comfortable with people they know -- and mistrust ones they've never heard of. You must get known [to them prior to initial contact]."
* "It is not what you say; it is what people hear. It is not what you communicate; it's what gets communicated." Why? "You tell your story with words, perhaps, but words are only symbols....Written words, in other words, are just symbols of symbols."
* "Clients do not buy solutions." Why? Numerous research studies indicate that "responsiveness to phone calls" and "sincere interest in developing a relationship" ranked higher in importance than "technical skill" -- the ability to devise solutions. According to Beckwith, "It isn't the better solution that clients value. It's the simple act of listening itself. We value it because of how we feel. It makes us feel important."
He suggests an abundance of strategies and tactics by which to achieve any organization's desired objectives, given the aforementioned trends which continue to create an especially volatile, increasingly ferocious competitive marketplace. For example, how to cope with "Option and Information Overload" (pages 45-96) and how to accommodate "The [Clients'] Wish to Connect" (pages 195-242). Moreover, in the final section of his book, Beckwith answers the question "Why do some people and businesses thrive?" He includes an especially relevant quotation from David Landes' The Wealth and Poverty of Nations:
"In this world, the optimists have it., not because they are always right, but because they are positive. Even when they are wrong they are positive, and that is the way of achievement, correction, improvement, and success. Educated, eye-open optimism pays."
Beckwith urges his reader to build "something that fills you with passion, and then spread its flames into every corner of your business....Triumph, then, belongs to those who believe...[to those who take] the path which runs along the cliff -- that one, the one without any guardrails." By doing so, he assures his reader, she or he will know "the exhilaration of the ride and the pride you feel when you reach the end will inspire you to take that path again and again." Clients love comfort, Beckwith insists, especially in an age when there are so many choices and messages. They crave comfort more than anything else. They will love those who provide it with expertise, clarity, integrity, and sincere interest...but also with passion because it shows "you love what you do."
Those who share my high opinion of this book are urged to check out several of the sources listed in Beckwith's annotated "Reading List for Growing a Business" (pages 267-274). To that list I presume to add Stephen Denning's The Springboard, David Maister's Practice What You Preach, and Napoleon Hill's Think and Grow Rich.
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39 of 44 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beckwith Bombs, January 5, 2003
This review is from: What Clients Love: A Field Guide to Growing Your Business (Hardcover)
Or so he tells us in the intro to his third marketing book.While on a tour for the first book,he did not follow his own advice---it's the small things that save us(he mispronounced the ceo's name at a speech for his company); interjected the negative(talked to a group about his divorce);and not believing in his heart of hearts(where it really counts)his advice that it's all about relationships and emotion.Although in the intro to the book,he follows his own advice that a little humility with a client(or a reader) generates lots of good will.But if you sell services---and Beckwith argues that most of us now do---his latest is for you.The book is divided into a couple of hundred chapters,each just a page or two long.And he hammers home his advice:be specific and concrete in describing what you do;find the transcendent meaning of what you do(for me,I no longer pratice employment law but help clients manage an employment matter before the matter manages them);and make sure that evreything you say,do,wear,creates the expectation that you are reliable,skilled,and trustworthy.The book arms you with both attitude and tactics:drop the idea of a "mission" or that you sell "solutions"---they are so 1990s;try contridictions like Omaha Surfing(or Beckwith Bombs and 5 stars come to think of it);and value your client's time.The book has so much jammed in it that it's like chocolate cake---almost too rich.He wraps up with a valuable appendix of checklists but with even more valuable advice:be passionate about what you do and your clients will be passionate about you.
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25 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Edge For Your Business, January 26, 2003
By 
Brian B. Carter (San Diego, CA United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: What Clients Love: A Field Guide to Growing Your Business (Hardcover)
When I write about practice managment, I tell acupuncturists to get to know Harry Beckwith. He's the ultimate practice management guru.
But Beckwith's books have nothing to do with medicine! How could he help there?
Beckwith writes about SERVICE marketing. Most of the practice management literature hasn't caught on. You're selling a service. Not a product.
Even now, your competition is stiff. Do you know who Harry says is your biggest competition? It's not who you think!
Your biggest competetion is the customer. If they don't think they need you... if they can do it themselves... if they find a way around you... you lose. And so do they, because they really DO need you. You've just got to prove it to them.
How could reading this book help your business? Harry's books contain hundreds of small sections... each with a story or market research study, some discussion, and a moral-of-the-story at the end. It's easy to digest these books in pieces.
Thank goodness (and thank Harry) that he didn't try to come up with one of those foolish 7 step plans... life's too fluid and organic. It can't be reduced to a set of rules.
Each piece stimulates ideas. You may slap your forehead more than once as you realize some of the mistakes you're making. Harry will help you think better.
I've read "Selling the Invisible," and "What Clients Love." I'm going to re-read them both. My Dad borrowed the second one... I may have to buy it again!
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Worth ten time the selling price!!!!, April 18, 2003
By 
"songbear" (Ashburn, VA United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: What Clients Love: A Field Guide to Growing Your Business (Hardcover)
This book is short, sweet, to the point, and reads like a daily devotional book. I plan on using at for discussion groups at work to get non-marketers to understand how to make customers happy. The book is written in a clear, concise, but extraordinarily interesting manner than lends itself to discussion and implementation. Each section contains at least one example of each point - and this is stuff you are going to remember. Many books in this market are pure fluff - you can't remember a darn thing they said two hours after you put the book down. Not so with "What Clients Love."
Highly recommend for those whose business depends on developing business and keeping customers happy. Whether selling hardcore tangible products or professional services, this book should be on your required reading list. Truly transformational.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Read it. Learn it. Share it., January 29, 2003
By 
William R. West (Houston, TX United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: What Clients Love: A Field Guide to Growing Your Business (Hardcover)
Just when you thought Harry Beckwith might have said all he had to say in his first two books, he drops this on us. It's a gold mine. He has uncovered all these nuggets of common sense and timely wisdom and neatly wrapped them up in an approachable and impactful style. And truthfully, the scope of the book goes beyond what clients love. It really gets to the core of how we often get in our own way and what we can do to change. As I was reading the book I realized how much easier my job would be if my clients understood what Harry so brilliantly points out. So I'll be buying copies for lots of folks. It will help us both. I suggest anyone in advertising or marketing do the same. (Maybe I should approach Harry about going on commission.) Good job, Harry. Thanks!
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Greatest Business Book Ever Written, January 10, 2003
This review is from: What Clients Love: A Field Guide to Growing Your Business (Hardcover)
What Clients Love is a timeless book that enlightens the reader through short lessons, personal and professional. Not only do the teachings apply to business, they can be carried over into your life outside of work as well. Businesses are built and strengthened through partnerships and good relations, so are close families and friends. This book works to bridge the gaps that most companies will overlook (such as boring job titles that send the wrong message) and Beckwith does it in a clear and concise manner. Buy this book! I wish I had more time to extoll the book, but I don't. Whether you are in a Fortune 500 company or a hermit with no interest in the outside world, you need this 278 page gospel! Also, if you get a chance to meet Harry Beckwith, ask him about his wonderful son Harry IV.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Extraordinary!, April 27, 2003
By 
Kit Kat (Knee deep in silage, somewhere in Illinois) - See all my reviews
This review is from: What Clients Love: A Field Guide to Growing Your Business (Hardcover)
I actually might give this book 6 stars. I'm surprised by the one criticism: that the author downplays the role of "scientific research," That reviewer her goes on to say the author relies "solely on selected circumstantial evidence." That was not my impression at all so I went back and scanned the book--knowing I'd seen Cialdini, for example, cited in this and one earlier book.
The author approvingly cites and relies on dozens of research studies, including Flesch's famous ones on readability, Stanford research on option overload, Nalini Ambady's Harvard research on stereotyping, Bornstein's work on familiarity and liking, Decision Quest's juror research on the perception of experts, Cialdini's on reciprocity--at least twenty when I stopped my mental count. What the author says in fact, and I agree, is that too many people overrely on research, particularly verbally based research, for their decisions, as if they believe that marketing-related research is totally conclusive, particularly if the research results are expressed in numbers and percentages. Beckwith says people must assemble all the available data, and must begin with the idea that, at least in marketing and customer behavior research, research never conclusively shows something. Research only "suggests" a possible conclusion.
When Beckwith offers only one piece of anecdotal circumstantial information, he most often supports it with what some might call "scientific research." That's the case with his conclusion about the pivotal role that a person's clarity plays in others' perceptions of that person's expertise. He cites his own surgeon father by way of anecdote, then turns to the Decision Quest studies (which I've heard may've involved over one million subjects.)
I don't require "scientific" support in business books, but this and Beckwith's first book often offer it to support his conclusions. (The second offers less, but still has been very helpful to me.) Most important, I've found these books very helpful to me in sales. The week after I read his first book I had the best week of my career. I was so startled by that immediate result that I emailed the authors a thanks. As the book suggests might have happened, he emailed me a nice thanks right back.
This books works. Bottom line. And it's great reading.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent thoughts on serving the customer, January 11, 2006
This review is from: What Clients Love: A Field Guide to Growing Your Business (Hardcover)
This book is about differentiating your company by focusing on the customer's needs. Sounds trite, right? How many other books say that?

Yet why do so many companies focus on preaching their greatness and expecting customers to break down their doors?

You can read this book in short bursts, or spend a day engrossed in its pages. The chapter sections are all titled and short. Not much wasted ink or wasted time.

Much of Beckwith's advice is contrarian, though. 'Stop Listening' is one example. He points out that listening to your customers is not a good idea because few clients (actually all people) speak to vendors (or anyone) completely truthfully. Instead, Beckwith suggests you stop listening and start looking at your clients. Understand what they do, not what they say.

Another is 'View Experts Skeptically.' We, as business people, always want the guru to tell us what to do so we can be successful. Experts don't really have the definitive answers. This puts the book into a bit of pretzel logic. He's really saying, 'Here's some killer advice - stop looking for killer advice and find your own path based on all the information you have available to you.'

In all, this book is highly readable, and thoroughly enjoyable. If it doesn't give you a dozen great ideas for your business, then you just weren't paying attention.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Send signals, not noise . . ., December 19, 2004
This review is from: What Clients Love: A Field Guide to Growing Your Business (Hardcover)
This great little volume was recommended to my by a client who, on recommendation, said that if I really wanted to know about her philosophy on marketing and building her business, this book would provide the answer. Well, if she indeed does practice what's in this volume, she will have a great company soon.

Beckwith's book is easy to read, full of great ideas and has excellent examples from successful and not so successful companies that we all know. He explains why every thing we do is really a service. Even if we have a product to sell. And we come to see why every service needs to be improved if we are to build great companies. He explores how unusual names get you noticed and remembered. And more importantly for us today, he explains why the market is inexorably moving to the rise of invisibles and intangibles (services not material products).

There are a great number of suggestions that will stick with the alert ready. Suggestions such as; "Edit your message until everyone understands it," or "Cut all the fat. Then ask: Does the muscle that remains have power?" All in all, this has been a very useful and instructive read. While not everything was new, there certainly was a new view of the challenges facing our businesses today.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another Excellent Book by Mr. Beckwith., September 25, 2003
This review is from: What Clients Love: A Field Guide to Growing Your Business (Hardcover)
This is another incredible contribution to the literature on marketing of service-oriented companies. Beckwith provides anecdotal accounts of what marketing techniques work; for instance, he talks about how he has helped to name certain companies that are descriptive, are memorable, and are not full of cliches. His account of Nike's rise to fame through the use of celebrity characters is also an intriguing account of the need for someone we can trust to help share our services. Beckwith's main point is that services are not like products. With services, we have to develop trust and believe in the person. Beckwith provides the techniques--such as providing some slightly negative, but truthful, information about yourself that will help to gather integrity. People like someone who has integrity and is believable.
Another very important principle of Beckwith's is that when you are selling a service, you are really building a relationship with your clients. If you appear to be focused on money or work in a truly impersonal basis, the clients will notice. There is a lot of psychology in this book. Almost every page is about "feelings" of one sort or another, which is necessary because people do not follow rigid rules of conduct. Instead, people often make decissions on irrational feelings, which, if one reads Harry Beckwith's book, they will be ready. And they will deliver exceptional services.
-- Michael Gordon
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What Clients Love: A Field Guide to Growing Your Business
What Clients Love: A Field Guide to Growing Your Business by Harry Beckwith (Hardcover - January 2, 2003)
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