Start reading What the Dog Saw: And Other Adventures on the free Kindle Reading App or on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Enter a promotion code
or gift card
 
 
 

Try it free

Sample the beginning of this book for free

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Anybody can read Kindle books—even without a Kindle device—with the FREE Kindle app for smartphones, tablets and computers.
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Color:
Image not available

To view this video download Flash Player

 

What the Dog Saw: And Other Adventures [Kindle Edition]

Malcolm Gladwell
4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (457 customer reviews)

Print List Price: $17.00
Kindle Price: $9.99
You Save: $7.01 (41%)
Sold by: Hachette Book Group

Whispersync for Voice

Now you can switch back and forth between reading the Kindle book and listening to the Audible audiobook. Learn more or scan your Kindle library to find matching professional narration for the Kindle books you already own.

Add the professional narration of What the Dog Saw: And Other Adventures for a reduced price of $12.99 after you buy this Kindle book.

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition $9.99  
Hardcover $27.99  
Paperback $17.00  
Audio, CD, Audiobook, Unabridged $39.98  
Unknown Binding --  
Audible Audio Edition, Unabridged $21.95 or Free with Audible 30-day free trial
New Adult Fiction by Rainbow Rowell
Acclaimed author Rainbow Rowell's latest book, Landline, offers a poignant, humorous look at relationships and marriage. Learn more

Book Description

What is the difference between choking and panicking? Why are there dozens of varieties of mustard-but only one variety of ketchup? What do football players teach us about how to hire teachers? What does hair dye tell us about the history of the 20th century?

In the past decade, Malcolm Gladwell has written three books that have radically changed how we understand our world and ourselves: The Tipping Point; Blink; and Outliers. Now, in What the Dog Saw, he brings together, for the first time, the best of his writing from The New Yorker over the same period.

Here is the bittersweet tale of the inventor of the birth control pill, and the dazzling inventions of the pasta sauce pioneer Howard Moscowitz. Gladwell sits with Ron Popeil, the king of the American kitchen, as he sells rotisserie ovens, and divines the secrets of Cesar Millan, the "dog whisperer" who can calm savage animals with the touch of his hand. He explores intelligence tests and ethnic profiling and "hindsight bias" and why it was that everyone in Silicon Valley once tripped over themselves to hire the same college graduate.

"Good writing," Gladwell says in his preface, "does not succeed or fail on the strength of its ability to persuade. It succeeds or fails on the strength of its ability to engage you, to make you think, to give you a glimpse into someone else's head." What the Dog Saw is yet another example of the buoyant spirit and unflagging curiosity that have made Malcolm Gladwell our most brilliant investigator of the hidden extraordinary.


Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Gladwell's fourth book comprises various contributions to the New Yorker and makes for an intriguing and often hilarious look at the hidden extraordinary. He wonders what... hair dye tell[s] us about twentieth century history, and observes firsthand dog whisperer Cesar Millan's uncanny ability to understand and be understood by his pack. Gladwell pulls double duty as author and narrator; while his delivery isn't the most dramatic or commanding, the material is frequently astonishing, and his reading is clear, heartfelt, and makes for genuinely pleasurable listening. A Little, Brown hardcover. (Nov.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

GREAT PRAISE FOR WHAT THE DOG SAW:

"[Malcolm Gladwell] is one of the brightest stars in the media firmament...Gladwell's clear prose and knack for upending conventional wisdom across the social sciences have made The Tipping Point, Blink and Outliers, as well as his lengthy magazine features on topics ranging from cool-hunting to ketchup, into must reads."—Alex Altman, Time.com

"This evidence of a Gladwell effect helps to predict something larger: that Mr. Gladwell's new book will be as successful as his first three...This book full of short conversation pieces is a collection that plays to the author's strengths. It underscores his way of finding suitably quirky subjects (the history of women's hair-dye advertisements; the secret of Heinz's unbeatable ketchup; even the effects of women's changing career patterns on the number of menstrual periods they experience in their lifetimes) and using each as gateway to some larger meaning."—Janet Maslin, New York Times

"Gladwell is a writer of many gifts. His nose for the untold back story will have readers repeatedly muttering, "Gee, that's interesting!" He avoids shopworn topics, easy moralization and conventional wisdom, encouraging his readers to think again and think different...Some chapters are masterpieces in the art of the essay."—Steven Pinker, The New York Times Book Review

"Uniformly delightful...Malcolm Gladwell can write engrossingly about just about anything...His witty, probing articles are as essential to David Remnick's New Yorker as those of Wolcott Gibbs and A.J. Liebling were to Harold Ross's...Gladwell has a gift for capturing personalities, a Borscht Belt comic's feel for timing and a bent for counterintuitive thinking. He loves to start a piece by settling you onto a cushion of received ideas, then yanking it out from under you."-—Craig Seligman, Bloomberg News

"Malcolm Gladwell triumphantly returns to his roots with this collections of his great works from The New Yorker Magazine....Do yourself a favor and curl up with What the Dog Saw this week: It is more entertaining and edifying than should be legal for any book."—Scott Coffman, Louisville Courier-Journal

"In What the Dog Saw, Malcolm Gladwell leads the reader on delightful side excursions, shows with insightful conversation how one path interweaves with another, and suggests meaning-he is, in short, an interpretative naturalist of American culture."—Alice Evans, The Oregonian

Product Details


Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
387 of 399 people found the following review helpful
Format:Hardcover
Malcolm Gladwell's "What the Dog Saw and Other Adventures" is a compilation of the author's favorite work from The New Yorker, where he has been a staff writer since 1996. This book is divided into three parts 1. Obsessives, Pioneers, and Other Varieties of Minor Genius 2. Theories, Predictions, and Diagnoses 3. Personality, Character, and Intelligence. In the first part, Gladwell includes portraits of a pitchman for kitchen gadgets who is so persuasive that he could sell clothing to a nudist. In addition, he discusses three female advertising pioneers, a canny investment strategist, and a "dog whisperer" who is able to tame even the most intransigent canine. What these people have in common is an understanding of how human beings (and four-legged creatures) think and feel, supreme self-confidence, and the ability to promote themselves and their ideas. The second part deals with the art of thinking and seeing clearly. Gladwell describes the series of events that led to the Challenger explosion and the collapse of Enron. Could these catastrophic events have been foreseen and prevented? In part three, the author discusses various aspects of genius and talent, and whether it is possible to profile criminal behavior or predict how a prospective employee will fare on the job.

"What the Dog Saw" has some intriguing passages that will impel readers to say, "I never thought of this subject in quite that way before." The provocative Gladwell enjoys toying with conventional wisdom and challenging our preconceived notions. For instance, in one article, he defends certain forms of plagiarism, a transgression that many would consider indefensible.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
434 of 452 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars If you don't need the actual physical book... November 16, 2009
Format:Hardcover
Not a review so much as a notice. If you don't need the actual book itself, you should know that all of these pieces are available on Malcolm Gladwell's website for free.
Was this review helpful to you?
227 of 265 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Don't bother - a collection of articles November 30, 2009
By BTrain
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
I'm a big fan of Gladwell's previous three books and how each of them took an idea and fully developed it over the course of a book. Admittedly the books were small, but that makes sense because I don't think you could write another 100 pages or so on any of those topics and keep the books as interesting to read as they were. When I saw a new book by Malcolm Gladwell out I jumped on it and went ahead and ordered it without even looking at a description of the book. Shame on me for granting Gladwell the status of having anything bought site-unseen. This book is merely a collection of previously published articles written for the new Yorker magazine. As articles they lack the depth and level of development seen in his previous books. Articles seem to be just that, magazine articles covering one subject rather than trying to take one idea and really expand upon it and explore it in depth. Yes, the articles are organized into an attempt to tie them more together into what the subject matter they are covering but that feels forced and like it was the little work the publisher had Gladwell do in putting this book together before they could print it and sell it to you.

Buy it if you don't get the New Yorker and don't really care that it isn't anything new or very similar to his previous books.
Don't buy it if you can wait for the paperback, or have already read his articles in the New Yorker, or are thinking this will be something like his previous books.
Was this review helpful to you?
57 of 64 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars exploring aspects of human psyche - article by article October 21, 2009
Format:Hardcover
In a compendium of previously published articles (as old as 1996 and as recent as 2008), Gladwell attempts to provide a unique window to the human psyche mostly in terms of its creativity, inventiveness, decision making and biases. While the articles themselves are very engaging read and informative, the compendium-of-best-articles, leaves the reader fairly direction-less due to the lack of an explicit theme or an overarching premise to contextualize the articles. Moreover, Gladwell doesn't use the opportunity to self-critique older articles and provide any additional insights that would have significantly helped the reader. Gladwell fans and frequent users of his website/blog may find the lack of new material disappointing.

In the first part Gladwell zigzags his way through kitchen gadgets, ketchup, Wall Street, hair dyes, birth control and dog whisperers. The range of the topics, notwithstanding, the reader is treated to unique glimpses of "hidden extraordinary" as the book jacket frames it. (Other reviewers have talked about the contents in the other two parts, but expect a wide plethora of topics) In a way, the lack of cohesiveness of the topics encourages the reader to wander to very different topics which oftentimes leads to surprising insights. The articles being written at different times shouldn't be expected to be able to maintain a uniform sense of engagement or interest to the reader.

After reading through the entire book,the reader is likely to have come across few instances or discussions that will force you to rethink, but overall, the book doesn't provide a relatively succinct theme or question such as the Outliers did for understanding success or the Tipping Point's take on ideas or Blink's take on gut responses. As entertaining and interesting a compendium this turned out to be, a reader will need to manage expectations with respect to this collection of articles.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Recent Customer Reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars thought provoking book!
The book is a series of essays from the New Yorker. I don't find them to hang together as well as others of his books, like Outliers. Read more
Published 9 hours ago by Daniel W. Moulton
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Another great book by Malcolm Gladwell.
Published 2 days ago by Cynthia
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Beautiful story. Exceptionally well written and crafted.
Published 3 days ago by CitizenZorro
5.0 out of 5 stars He Always Opens My Eyes
I have read many of his books and he never fails to open my eyes. The range of topics covered is wide and his insights are usually right on target.
Published 4 days ago by Coach
5.0 out of 5 stars From Edward Zivica, Whispering Whale the novel, Amazon
Mr. Gladwell has a unique way of thinking. This is the 1st of his books that I have read, but it won't be the last. A good read for any inquiring mind. Read more
Published 5 days ago by Edward Zivica
5.0 out of 5 stars and enjoyed! Excellent book
This was a gift and was very warmly received, and enjoyed! Excellent book.
Published 7 days ago by Boswell
2.0 out of 5 stars Two Stars
Random topics that goes all over the place without any synergy.
Published 8 days ago by Ezio
3.0 out of 5 stars Mixed bag
I'm a big Malcolm Gladwell fan and read most of his books. This one is a mixed bag; some chapters are as exciting as Malcolm's other works but some I found somewhat boring.
Published 8 days ago by ASL
3.0 out of 5 stars Three Stars
gift
Published 9 days ago by bl
5.0 out of 5 stars Another brilliant book by Gladwell
Malcolm Gladwell has done it again.
Published 14 days ago by David Olson
Search Customer Reviews
Search these reviews only

More About the Author

Malcolm Gladwell has been a staff writer at The New Yorker since 1996. He is the author of The Tipping Point, Blink, Outliers, and What the Dog Saw. Prior to joining The New Yorker, he was a reporter at the Washington Post. Gladwell was born in England and grew up in rural Ontario. He now lives in New York.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?



Forums

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions

Topic From this Discussion
Why is the Kindle version more than the hardcover?
I've been seeing trend of bestsellers being more expensive on Kindle. This is complete rip-off. Not only that, Amazon has some real bad price discrepancies across the site. I'm a very new Kindle user, I was hoping to spend less on books after investing a couple of hundred bucks, looks like Amazon... Read More
Dec 20, 2010 by H. Acharya |  See all 8 posts
Kindle more expensive than hardcover?
You should buy the hardback edition then. You get the advantage of more weight, extra thickness, having to hold open a book while reading, annoying shadows when you get in the middle part of the book, no dictionary, wasted shelf space....... I'll take kindle all day, everyday!
Jan 25, 2011 by F. Yung |  See all 2 posts
David and Goliath Be the first to reply
Problems in Blowing Up chapter Be the first to reply
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 




Look for Similar Items by Category