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What on Earth?: 100 of Our Planet's Most Amazing New Species Paperback – April 30, 2013

ISBN-13: 978-0452298149 ISBN-10: 0452298148

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Plume (April 30, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0452298148
  • ISBN-13: 978-0452298149
  • Product Dimensions: 0.7 x 6.9 x 6.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #698,521 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Quentin Wheeler is a longtime professor of entomology and founder of the International Institute for Species Exploration.
Sara Pennak manages the Institute’s reports and public outreach activities. Both authors live in Arizona.

More About the Author

Quentin Wheeler is a scientist, author, lecturer, professor, and science administrator. He is currently professor, jointly appointed in the School of Sustainability and School of Life Sciences, at Arizona State University where he is also a Senior Sustainability Scientist in the Global Institute of Sustainability and Founding Director of the International Institute for Species Exploration. He received his PhD from The Ohio State University. Before joining ASU in 2006, he was a professor at Cornell University for 24 years, director of the Division of Environmental Biology at the National Science Foundation in Arlington, Virginia, and Keeper and Head of Entomology in The Natural History Museum in London, England. From 2007 to 2011, Wheeler was University Vice President and Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Arizona State University. His research interests focus on the exploration and sustainability of biodiversity; the roles of taxonomy and natural history museums in science and society; and the evolution, natural history, and classification of beetles. He lives in Tempe, Arizona, with his wife Marie and Chesapeake Bay Retriever, Maddie. Wheeler has published more than 150 scientific articles, and named more than 100 new species. His books include Fungus-Insect Relationships: Perspectives in Ecology and Evolution; Extinction and Phylogeny; Species Concepts and Phylogenetic Theory: A Debate; The New Taxonomy; Letters to Linnaeus; and What on Earth?

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Rollercoaster on May 1, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Really a must have. This book is not only gorgeous and high quality color pics, but the information is the latest and up to date. It's told in an informative yet entertaining style. I can see this for young kids as well as adults. The book covers everything from animals to plants to newly discovered fossils. Quite amazing, great arm chair book!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Heather Montgomery on May 24, 2013
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From a spider as big as dinner plate to a miniature jellyfish with a deadly sting, WHAT ON EARTH highlights some of the most unique species on the planet -- and they are all new to science! Each recently discovered plant or animal species is described through a paragraph of engaging text, a fact-box with basic information and supplemental photos.

Wheeler and Pennak have done an exceptional job of presenting important scientific concepts and issues (the history of taxonomy, the importance of biodiversity, the critical nature of sustainability) complemented by fun facts (like why an ant was named after Google). You'll flip through WHAT ON EARTH intending to just browse but it will suck you in and you'll read it from cover-to-cover. An obvious choice for all lovers of nature, with so many fun facts and beautiful photos,this book will also hook those who aren't so wild about the outdoors. Who knew there were so many crazy creatures still being discovered!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Az Girl on January 4, 2014
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This amazing book reminds us just how amazing the world is! Beautiful photos in a well done easy to read presentation.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Frederick G. Hochberg on May 26, 2013
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Stunning new book that celebrates the beauty and diversity of life on earth. Photographs of new species described in the first part of this century are amazing
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