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What to Expect Before You're Expecting Paperback – May 15, 2009


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What to Expect Before You're Expecting + What to Expect When You're Expecting, 4th Edition + What to Expect: Eating Well When You're Expecting
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 275 pages
  • Publisher: Workman Publishing Company; 1 edition (May 15, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0761152768
  • ISBN-13: 978-0761152767
  • Product Dimensions: 8.8 x 6 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (178 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,064 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Book Description
More and more couples are planning for conception, not only for financial and lifestyle reasons, but in response to recent recommendations from the medical community. In the same fresh, contemporary voice that has made the 4th edition of What to Expect When You're Expecting so successful, Heidi Murkoff explains the whys and wherefores of getting your body ready for pregnancy, including pregnancy prep for both moms and dads to be. Before You're Expecting is filled with information on exercise, diet, pinpointing ovulation, lifestyle, workplace, and insurance changes you'll want to consider, and how to keep your relationship strong when you're focused on baby making all the time. There are tips for older couples; when to look for help from a fertility specialist--including the latest on fertility drugs and procedures--plus a complete fertility planner.



Read Heidi Murkoff's Introduction to What to Expect Before You're Expecting
Pregnancy, as you probably know, is nine months long (or 38 weeks from conception, if you're really serious about keeping count). And if you've ever been pregnant before, you probably think that's plenty long enough. But is nine months really long enough? Does that time-honored baby-making timetable really stand up to the latest obstetrical science?

According to more and more research--and more and more experts (including the Centers for Disease Control, American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, and the American College of Pediatrics)--the answer is maybe not. That traditional nine-month figure is being challenged by a surprising new suggestion: It’s time to add more months to pregnancy.

That's right, more months. At least three more months, in fact, for a full year (or even more) of baby making. But before you panic (three extra months of not seeing my feet? Of passing on the sushi? Of waiting to hold that bundle of joy?), here’s what you need to know: Those extra months aren’t meant to be spent being pregnant, they’re meant to be spent getting ready to be pregnant.

Before you're expecting--and before you even begin trying to expect--is the best time to get both your bodies into tip-top baby-making shape. And that's why I've written What to Expect Before You're Expecting--a complete, step-by-step preconception plan to help you and your partner prep for pregnancy. Whether you're hoping to fill your nest for the first time or the fourth (or more!), a little conception know-how--which lifestyle adjustments you should make now (cut back on caffeine and cocktails) and which you can hold off on (get your sushi while you can!); which foods are fertility-friendly and which are fertility busters (say yes to yams and oysters, so long to saturated fats); how extra weight can weigh on your fertility and his; how to track fertility and pinpoint ovulation--can help you fill that nest faster. What's more, the right preconception protocol can help ensure a healthier and more comfortable pregnancy (think less morning sickness, a lowered risk of premature delivery and gestational diabetes) and a healthier bundle of baby. And the plan doesn't end when you're finished with the prepping. It covers baby-making how-to's, do's, and don'ts--everything you need to know about conception sex (from timing, to logistics, to positions, and more).

Whether you've begun your conception campaign already or you're just starting to think about getting pregnant, it’s never too late--or too early--to start optimizing your preconception profile, giving the baby of your dreams the healthiest possible start in life. So put time on your side, and add a few months to your baby-making calendar. More pregnancy, as it turns out, is more.


--This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Publishers Weekly

Pregnancy guru Murkoff (What to Expect When You're Expecting) explains that a healthy pregnancy actually begins long before sperm and egg meet. In fact, she suggests that couples add at least three months to the requisite nine in order to prepare both their bodies for the best outcome. Backed by research and expert advice, Murkoff and Mazel present a preconception program that includes tips on what to eat (and not eat), how to maintain a healthy weight and advice about preconception medical care, such as having a physical and dental checkup. The text points out that dads are vitally important to pre-pregnancy health, with warnings that heavy drinking and smoking can damage or reduce sperm, as can certain sports such as spinning, cycling or heavy workouts. (Shaded boxes throughout the text address the ways in which men can contribute to baby-to-be's successful arrival.) The text also covers fertility issues, clearly explaining œthe biology of baby making and outlining the options available to couples who are facing conception problems. Readers who like to think ahead will also benefit from a detailed fertility planner, which includes a fertility chart to track ovulation and space to record various pre-baby appointments and information. Couples who are trying to conceive will find plenty of useful ideas to consider and implement in the months preceding their baby's debut. (May)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

More About the Author

Heidi Murkoff is the author of the What to Expect®; series and author of Eating Well When You're Expecting, The What to Expect Pregnancy Journal & Organizer, What to Expect the First Year, The What to Expect Baby-Sitter's Handbook, and the What to Expect Kids series from HarperCollins. Her interactive website is www.whattoexpect.com, and she lives with her family in Los Angeles, California.

Customer Reviews

Very informational but a very interesting read.
Brittany S.
The book could have been much shorter had she not tried to embellish, but I'm sure some people like that sort of thing.
Chula
I definitely recommend reading this book if you are trying to conceive a baby!
Skin diva

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

128 of 128 people found the following review helpful By sss147 on October 18, 2010
Format: Paperback
There is some great information in this book. It's an excellent starting point if you want to get a jump on reading up about pre-conception health. It's also a good conversation starter with your partner (it's great for both parents to spend some time reading the book, both the "mom" and "dad" sections). The info on trouble trying to conceive was particularly helpful. However, after hearing all the hype about the "What To Expect" series, I expected it to be a better written book.

The book had some continuity problems. It looked like paragraphs and maybe even chapters had been copied and pasted straight out of the other books without checking for continuity. Acronyms would be used over and over and over again and never defined. Meanwhile, the acronym "STD" shows up for the hundredth time around page 200 and is defined. Pretty sure we all know what STDs are, and if we don't, we googled it 150 pages ago. But thanks.

Sometimes things would be mentioned in passing, never to be brought up again. "Get your blood tested for your Rh factor, and if you are positive, make sure your partner isn't." WHAT?! This sounds really serious. What does this mean? Yeah, the book totally leaves you hanging. Google it. Again, I expect that if the book is going to bring it up, explain to me why this is so important.

Some chapters left me with more question than answers. For example, it encouraged readers to drink lots of milk. Ok great, but more adult women are lactose intolerant than not. Since the book advised moms-to-be to limit soy, what alternatives should we seek for upping calcium intake? The author really didn't have a lot of suggestions. And speaking of soy, the author was very vague. Basically, "don't eat a lot of it." Well, what's "a lot?
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111 of 123 people found the following review helpful By Mari on June 24, 2009
Format: Paperback
Okay, I will give the author this, there is some valuable information to be had here. The problem is that she uses language that you would find in a magazine like Vogue or Cosmo. You know those quick reads on how to make a man happy in bed, how to dress your body type etc.

Quite frankly, that kind of vocabulary and manner of speaking is plain annoying! For example, at one she is giving men advice on how to keep the romance alive while trying to conceive. Great idea! However, she uses this phrase, "Woo her while you do her."

Ick! And it just keeps going on and on and on. Every other word is from the pages of a fashion rag. I got so annoyed I couldn't even read a chapter. Sure, I want some humor and warmth when I am reading a non-fiction book, but this was taking bad jokes and regurgitating them on every other page. If you like to read Cosmo and Vogue then you will probably have no problem with this. But the rest of use want a little more hard-headed and to-the-point advice.
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33 of 38 people found the following review helpful By michelle on February 8, 2010
Format: Paperback
I flew through this book in 2 nights, yawning. Maybe this is just because I have researched TTC online, but I really didn't learn much from this book. I like how the questions are asked point blank , but then the answers will usually ramble on and on for paragraphs, most of which have very little to do with the actual question. It got downright annoying at times. I also expected a more informative diet plan and food breakdown, but (shock!!) I suppose I would have to buy the "What to eat while you are expecting" book from this author.
Most of the topics I wanted more details on (depression meds, bariatric surgery, ect) were answered with basically a "Yes, No, Well you should ask your personal doctor about that" theme. Gee, thanks.
Overall, I think the amount of useful information from this book (after eliminating the sidetracked rambling and stupid jokes) could have been condensed to a pamphlet.

UPDATE: Depression Meds: This book states INCORRECTLY on page 9 that Wellbutrin is proven safe for pregnancy. This is absolutely NOT TRUE! It is classified as a type C drug. It has been tested on animals and has shown some defects in the offspring of rabbits and mice. No adequete human studies have been done on pregnant women or newborns who have been exposed to this drug. Shame on the author and editor of this book. Get your facts straight, Ms, Murkoff!!!!
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57 of 70 people found the following review helpful By J. Stoner VINE VOICE on May 25, 2009
Format: Paperback
WHAT TO EXPECT BEFORE YOU'RE EXPECTING is just like the other books in the expecting "series:" Jam packed with information in a good format. There are sections for both the "Mother to Be" and the "Father to Be," but neither are exclusive and should be read by both parties; in fact, there is more for men in this book than What to Expect When You're Expecting: 4th Edition. You probably already know what to expect given the monumental success of the previous Expecting books, and this book is no exception. Sections of the book include: Nutrition, Basic Anatomy, Ovulation, Timing of Intimacy, Miscarriage and Infertility, Medications, and tons of other little questions.

This book is excellent, but the next few comments should not be taken as criticisms but rather just information.

The difference with this installment is that there is more humor woven into the text than the previous books, which helps lighten the load; however, the humor at points is too much of a good thing, and the writing can seem juvenile and uses a lot of immature phrases (i.e. Aunt Flo), which I feel undermines the writing slightly.

One other thing is the book takes some of the magic away, providing step by step instructions, hundreds of pages of what to do better. I can totally appreciate how this book may help people who have struggled with conception, and I feel this book will be revered in that case. However, for everyone else be prepared to have the magic of conception possibly ruined as baby making becomes a job, you are forced to follow a specific calendar, and monitoring your diet.
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