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What to Expect The Toddler Years Paperback – September 27, 2011


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 904 pages
  • Publisher: Workman Publishing Company; 1 edition (September 27, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0894809946
  • ISBN-13: 978-0894809941
  • Product Dimensions: 1.8 x 6.1 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (222 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #560,756 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Since the extended family no longer lives nearby, new parents often turn to books for advice on child care. These two new sources, although different in format and scope, provide useful information to parents with young children. The first volume of The Disney Encyclopedia of Baby and Child Care covers development from birth through age six, describing milestones and explaining care techniques. Boxes highlight important information. There are also sections on basic first aid and the common symptoms of childhood diseases. Volume 2 is an alphabetically arranged encyclopedia of child health and illness issues, with short entries on conditions and behaviors (e.g., aggression, toeing in, worms). A referral list of relevant organizations is included. The authors are pediatricians who provide current, high-quality information, but the material provided is at a ready-reference level. Readers seeking depth will need other sources, and this set lacks a bibliography. The authors of the successful "What To Expect" series offer a volume on the second and third years of life. This book contains 900 pages of useful information divided into four sections. Like the Disney set, the first part concerns development, milestones, pediatric checkups, and parental concerns, but the authors add valuable material on what parents should know and what they should teach toddlers. Part 2 on health and safety covers general care, nutrition, home safety, first aid, toilet training, and caring for children with special needs. Part 3 offers important information on the toddler in the family, including issues such as sibling rivalry, parenting techniques, working parents, child care, adoption, divorce, and death?topics not discussed in the Disney work. Part 4 is a ready-reference source offering activity suggestions, recipes, home remedies, the symptoms and treatment of common illnesses, and forms for charting growth, health history, and memorable moments. This is an outstanding source written by and for parents. Easy to use, affordable, and reassuring, it encourages parents to enjoy their children. More illustrations and first aid information and a bibliography would have been useful, but What To Expect: The Toddler Years belongs in all parenting collections. The Disney Encyclopedia of Baby and Child Care is a good complementary source that provides additional medical information. Although less detailed than The Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons Complete Guide to Early Child Care (Crown, 1990), it is a useful ready-reference source.?Barbara M. Bibel, Oakland P.L., Cal.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Review

Parents of toddlers will find this a refreshingly well detailed, comprehensive presentation on what to expect during the second and third years of a child's life. From toilet training and tantrums to providing the proper learning experiences, parents receive insights on the child's mind at this age, and on how they can improve a child's learning curve. -- Midwest Book Review

More About the Author

Arlene Eisenberg worked on all three editions of What to Expect When You're Expecting and remained active in the What To Expect Foundation until her death in February 2001. She was also co-author, with Heidi Murkoff, of the "What to Expect" magazine columns.

Customer Reviews

This book is very informative and helpful.
Keisha
It is problematic for the unrevised book to still be on the market with the series as popular as it is and misinformation that could be injurious to public health.
Groggie
This great easy to read book series (what to expect when you are expecting,... the first year... the toddler years) does just what it says it does.
T MacQueen

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

86 of 101 people found the following review helpful By H. Pagliughi on January 2, 2006
Format: Paperback
I have the whole 'series' and while I found the pregnancy and 1st year books helpful, I hardly ever used this book. The month by month format is helpful for babies/pregnancy, but toddlers don't really change month by month as drastically, so I disliked the organization. I agree with another reviewer that there is a bias/agenda to wean by 1 year and if you are into attachment parenting, this book doesn't fall in line with that at all. I just find it too broad and it hardly ever gave me the answers I wanted.
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159 of 191 people found the following review helpful By California mom on May 8, 2006
Format: Paperback
DO NOT BUY THIS BOOK. There are many, many other books out there that will provide sound advice for raising your toddler. This book is awful. Here are some of the reasons why:

1. It is poorly organized and extremely difficult to find particular issues of interest if you are seeking advice on a specific subject. If you do find it in the index, the issue is probably discussed on 10 different pages so you have to flip around from one section to another in the hope that at least one of those pages will address the point on which you need guidance.

2. It is WAY TOO LONG. Don't be fooled that the weight of this book or number of pages means you will be getting more information than other books. Every single "question" topic begins with a wordy and pointless paragraph that doesn't provide any insight or advice before even attempting to start getting to the point. Only about 10% of this book actually provides useful, substantive information. As a parent of a toddler, I don't have time to search through the authors' ramblings in the hope they will ultimately get to the point. It is extremely frustrating.

3. The authors feel the need to "preach" their particular political position on various issues over and over and over again. Even if you agree with them, it's totally unnecessary. For example, they include discussions about the importance of teaching your child to recycle and respect the earth. OK, fine. But they then raise this point over and over when it is a totally unnecessary (NAGGING) aside - like when talking about placing a cover on the floor so your child can enjoy a messy art project, they mention newspaper as a possible cover but can't resist adding "(you can recycle it later)." It is annoying.

4.
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67 of 80 people found the following review helpful By S. Kennedy on May 17, 2006
Format: Paperback
I was very eager to read this book, but was left disappointed after just 10 minutes of reading. The authors' views seem obviously self-serving and painfully narrow-minded. I wanted something that had more of an inclusive approach to parenting. As a mother who still breastfeeds her daughter, who is 13 months old, this book has absolutely nothing encouraging or useful for me. Heaven forbid if your child doesn't sleep through the night. You are a complete loser - at least in this book's opinion - if your child has any night wakings and you attend to them. As one of the questions reads: "Our toddler is still waking up in the middle of the night. We've been cowardly about letting her cry it out up until now...." Cowardly! This was the last straw for me. I wanted real testimonials from parents who've experienced the full spectrum of problems from sleeping to eating and how they solved these issues. This book gives lazy answers that leave you not only in the dark, but annoyed that you wasted your time with this book.
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53 of 65 people found the following review helpful By J. Scharp on April 18, 2001
Format: Paperback
I recently purchased this large and informative book (I have a 2.5 year old). I should have bought it sooner, it is filled with a lot of great ideas on all areas of toddlerhood. And all us parents of toddlers know that the "terrible two's" can start way before the child is 2!
Everyone's child and everyone's parenting is a bit different, so it is hard to guarantee that you will love this book. However, this book covers almost every topic imaginable for toddlerhood and I have found many of the ideas useful and much of the information helpful. It is a good reference tool for parents during a stage in a child's life that can seem pretty hard.
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Me on March 12, 2002
Format: Paperback
I have What to expect when expecting and the first year, and loved them. So I naturally bought this one when the time came. I am so disapointed in it. On more than one occasion I have gone to it with a question or problem and have found nothing about it. Simple stuff too. But they tend to cover more obscure subjects. I have no idea where they have gotten their "questions." I have found this book shoved under the nightstand for months, whereas the other two were practically under my arms 24/7. When I do take it out because I have a concern, 9 times out of 10, it hasn't helped a bit. I am now searching for a new book that will give me some piece of mind.
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31 of 38 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 7, 2002
Format: Paperback
as in Eisenberg's earlier books, "What to Expect When You're Expecting" and "What to Expect The First Year."
Like those two volumes, "What to Expect Toddler Years" is arranged month-by-month. This doesn't work as well since toddler development is much less predictable and more individualistic than infants development; hence, the issue in question might be found in "The Twentieth Month" even though your toddler is only, say, 15 months old. Also, the monthly "milestone" lists for toddlers are guaranteed to make you neurotic, as toddler development is much more individual than infant development.
However, the book contains a lot of great information and advice. I think it would have been better to organize it into sections such as "Feeding," "Discipline," "Sleeping," "Playtime," etc., rather than trying to break it down month-by-month, but taken as a whole it is a valuable reference. Just don't panic if your 13-month-old is already throwing tantrums and they aren't addressed til Month 24, and if your 18-month-old still hasn't mastered a spoon even though the list says she "should" be able to do it by now.
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