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What to Expect When You're Expecting Joeys: A Guide for Marsupial Parents (and Curious Kids) (Expecting Animal Babies) Library Binding – October 1, 2011


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 7 and up
  • Grade Level: 2 and up
  • Lexile Measure: 660L (What's this?)
  • Series: Expecting Animal Babies
  • Library Binding: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Millbrook Press (October 1, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0761358595
  • ISBN-13: 978-0761358596
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 10.9 x 0.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,969,088 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Bridget Heos is the author of 13 young adult nonfiction books. Her first picture book, What to Expect When You're Expecting Larvae: A Guide for Insect Parents (and Curious Children), comes out in March of 2011. It is illustrated by Stéphane Jorisch. Bridget lives in Kansas City with her husband and three sons.

More About the Author

Bridget Heos is the author of Mustache Baby, illustrated by Joy Ang, and the forthcoming sequel, Mustache Baby vs. Beard Baby (2015.) She has also written more than 60 nonfiction children's titles, including Stronger Than Steel, with photographs by Andy Comins. The Scientists in the Field title was named a Junior Library Guild selection. Bridget lives in Kansas City with her husband and four children. You can visit her on the Web at authorbridgetheos.com, on Facebook @Author Bridget Heos, or on Twitter @BridgetHeos.

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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See all 7 customer reviews
The illustrations are very appealing and mesh well with the format.
D. Fowler
Even though they are tiny, pinkies must make their own way to the pouches that will be their home until they're ready to leave their mother.
Amazon Customer
This is definitely a picture book for older children and one I'd highly recommend for classroom teaching as well as in the home.
Danielle M. Smith

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

By Donna B on February 16, 2014
Format: Library Binding Verified Purchase
And this is so much fun! My kids love it and choose it often for our reading time. Definitely a great book.
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Format: Library Binding
In this book written as advice for marsupial parents, Bridget Heos begins by telling marsupials how they differ from other mammals. She describes what they should expect when their babies are born. Newborn marsupial babies are called pinkies. Later they are called joeys. Pinkies are furless little creatures who still have a lot of growing to do before they leave the protection of their mother. Even the largest marsupial, the kangaroo, gives birth to pinkies only the size of a jelly bean.

Most often the babies ride in pouches or pockets provided on the mother's body. These pouches are different on each type of marsupial. The kangaroo or wallaby pouch is open so the mother can look down and see her baby. Other marsupials have pouches that open toward the mother's rear. That way it won't fill with dirt when she digs. Still others open in the middle of the pouch, looking like a giant belly button.

Not all marsupials have pouches. Some keep their babies on their belly, holding them close by tightening special stomach muscles.

Even though they are tiny, pinkies must make their own way to the pouches that will be their home until they're ready to leave their mother. Pinkies with mothers who have downward facing poaches have a shorter path to their pouch than those facing upwards like the kangaroo.

Even if you are a marsupial lover (and who isn't?), you'll find this clever book is full of interesting facts you might not have known. For example, did you know that if the mother kangaroo becomes pregnant while she's still carrying a joey in her pouch, the joey inside her body stops growing until the joey inside the pouch leaves his mother? Then the baby begins growing again.

Heos makes learning about marsupials fun by writing to the marsupial parents themselves. Stepane Jorisch's illustrations provide additional humor.

The original review first appeared on Bookloons.com
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Format: Library Binding
I'll say right off the bat that I had no problem with the content. The format is fun and informative. The information was accurate and the question and answer format was interesting. I did learn things I didn't know, for example, I didn't realize that some marsupials such as wombats and koalas have pouches that face down/backwards. Unfortunately, the illustration on page 11 contradicts this. I understand the intention was to create cute illustrations and Jorisch succeeded, but I think they could have been accurate as well.

It also bothered me that the animals depicted were not labeled (no captions) at all. If I hadn't already known what a koala or wombat or wallaby looked like I wouldn't have known what animal was what. I did notice that the illustrator tried to illustrate the animals that the author mentions in the text, but when several animals were mentioned it sometimes created confusion about what animals were being shown. I would have liked to see more precise illustrations, photographs would have been even better. Overall, the information was great but the illustrations provided a light, humorous touch. I would recommend Nic Bishop's Marsupials for a more accurate depiction of different types of marsupials.
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Format: Library Binding
Inquisitive kiddos want to fill their minds with bits of knowledge that will not only entertain them but be great conversation starters where ever they may travel. In What to Expect When You're Expecting Joeys: A Guide for Marsupial Parents (And Curious Kids) the author, Bridget Heos along with the illustrator, Stéphane Jorisch, do just that. Together they've created a non-fiction picture book for learning seekers who have a burning desire to know more about the animals (or marsupials in this case) in the world around them.

So, when the Turkeybird says he asks me over and over and over to read this book, he's not lying. There has rarely been a day go by in the last month or more where he hasn't asked to read this book. It's incredible! We'll be driving somewhere and he'll randomly mention what a burrow is or nectar. What's even better is that he cannot seem to get enough of those little bits of information he gathers every time he reads through What to Expect When You're Expecting Joeys: A Guide for Marsupial Parents (And Curious Kids). By no means do I think he understands all of the book and the many aspects of childbirth in marsupials, but he's learning and exited about it. That to me is worth it's weight in gold.

Bridget Heos has created a non-fiction picture book that reads like fiction for children. Yes, it's lengthy. No, you wouldn't guess that from the number of pages for the book, but upon opening the story you'll discover treasure troves of information every where. My guess is that this is the exact reason Littlebug (now just around age two and a half) doesn't enjoy reading this one yet, because of the lengthy text. Give her two years and she may be reacting in a completely different way, perhaps much like her older brother at four and a half.
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