Industrial-Sized Deals Shop all Back to School Shop Men's Hightops Learn more nav_sap_plcc_6M_fly_beacon Cecile McLorin Salvant $5 Off Fire TV Stick Grocery Shop Popular Services TransparentGGWin TransparentGGWin TransparentGGWin  Amazon Echo Starting at $99 Kindle Voyage Nintendo Digital Games Shop Back to School with Amazon Back to School with Amazon Outdoor Recreation Deal of the Day
What Goes Up... and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$4.00
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: The item shows wear from consistent use, but it remains in good condition and works perfectly. It may be marked, have identifying markings on it, or show other signs of previous use.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

What Goes Up: Surviving the Manic Episode of a Loved One Paperback – May 5, 2005

27 customer reviews

See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$37.94 $0.01

New & Popular:"The Brain Fog Fix"
Read the popular new book by Mike Dow.

Editorial Reviews

Review

Eron provides an excellent list of spousal survival strategies, as well as a helpful bibliography. Recommended for all public libraries. -- Library Journal, May, 2005

Once I started, I could not put this book down. -- Xavier Amador, PhD. author, I AM NOT SICK;I DON'T NEED HELP

Readers who never experience such trials will find the story irresistible all the way to its bittersweet ending. -- Foreword, September, 2005

There's a moral here for individuals with bipolar disorder and their families; the book will be very useful for them. -- E. Fuller Torrey, MD

This is a love song written by a survivor of suicide, at times heart-breaking and frightening, yet brimming with life. -- Morton Silverman,MD SUICIDE AND LIFE-THREATENING BEHAVIOR

From the Publisher

Gravity is a fact, something that Judy Eron knows all too well. Her husband Jim had bipolar disorder and took his own life in 1997, after coming down from a full-blown manic episode that lasted a year. Judy turned her grief into action, writing WHAT GOES UP. . .Surviving the Manic Episode of a Loved One, a memoir cum self-help book, published by Barricade Books in June, 2005.

WHAT GOES UP addresses specifically the manic phase of bipolar disorder, a topic whose coverage pales in comparison to that of depression.

Judy tells her story of loving, living with, and losing Jim, and offers coping strategies for others with loved ones who suffer from this devastating illness - parents, children, siblings, even friends - advising them on what they should expect from someone in the midst of a manic episode, how to engage with that person, how to get help for that person, and how to maintain their own sanity and strength in the face of such unpredictable and intense behavior. In addition, Judy stresses the important of pre-planning when the individual is well.

This book is a caution to others that bipolar disorder is a cycling and potentially fatal illness, one not to be romanticized as several recent books and newspaper articles on the subject have done. Judy emphasizes that a person who is manic can be flying so high and be so persuasive that those around him or her can easily forget that the individual is bound for a fall and that depression and suicide are just waiting in the wings. Even Jim, a brilliant psychologist, and Judy, a social worker, were unprepared for Jim’s sudden spiral into mania.

See all Editorial Reviews
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Barricade Books (May 5, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1569802858
  • ISBN-13: 978-1569802854
  • Product Dimensions: 5.8 x 0.7 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,599,034 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author


Bipolar disorder is a tricky illness, as people can be so well, and then become so ill. Although there are many resources for understanding and dealing with the depression of bipolar disorder, there exists very little information about dealing with mania. Family members are often ill-equipped to deal with the manic episodes of their loved one, and lack the information of all they can do to plan for this possibility together, when he or she is well.

Judy learned this the hard way. She and her husband Jim, a psychologist, were seduced by his wellness, and did not prepare for the cycling nature of bipolar disorder. After 13 successful years on lithium, he abruptly stopped taking it, which led to a year-long manic episode and ended in Jim's suicide.
Drawing from personal and professional knowledge and experience, Judy uses lecture, discussion, and song to explore preventative measures, planning, coping strategies, and resources to assist families in dealing with the mania of bipolar disorder.

Judy Eron is a licensed clinical social worker and singer/songwriter. Since 1978, she has counseled people with depression and end-of-life issues. Simultaneously, she has written songs and performed for many different psychological groups including the National Association of Social Workers and the American Association of Suicidology. She has shared the stage with country giants Kathy Mattea and Dotty West.
As a volunteer on national disasters, Judy has done much work with the American Red Cross. Most notably, she was the first Red Cross volunteer sent from West Texas to the World Trade Center tragedy.
In 1987, Judy married Jim, a psychologist, in Nashville, Tennessee, where the couple counseled families dealing with HIV and AIDS. In 1993, Judy and Jim moved to the remote mountain desert of southwest Texas and with their own hands built a home, designing all electricity to come from solar power and all water to come from rain catchment. Seduced by Jim's wellness, they did not prepare sufficiently for the cycling nature of Jim's bipolar disorder.
Jim's manic episode and subsequent suicide in 1997 led Judy to write What Goes Up. Her years of experience in the field of mental health and her humbling personal experience of dealing with Jim's mental illness combine with her skills as a writer and performer to bring a unique perspective to the subject of dealing with the mania of manic-depressive illness.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Debbie Campbell on February 21, 2007
Format: Paperback
God bless Judy Eron for sharing what she experienced and learned during her bipolar husband's manic episode. I bought this book for some friends, a long-time married couple who have dealt with bipolar disorder for many years. After giving it a favorable review, they loaned it back to me. I was eager to read it, hoping it would help me understand what they've been going through.

Well, what a nightmare. For me, the most terrifying thing about this story is that the author and her husband were both mental health professionals! If _they_ didn't know what to do, how in the world would the rest of us be able to recognize or deal with someone going through this?!

There's no happy ending or quick fixes here, but Eron helps us understand a manic person's distorted way of thinking, how it's important not to get drawn into that person's (paranoid) delusions, and what strategies may or may not be helpful. For example, I was surprised that an "intervention," which would have seemed an obvious choice to me, in fact only fed her husband's anger and paranoia and pushed him farther away from accepting help.

I used to think that manic meant really happy. Now, sadly, I know better.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By D. Locascio on September 16, 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I read this book in awe. She experienced many of that same things I thought were unique to my situation. I wish I had found this book a year ago when in my own "bad year" with my husband. If you love someone who is bipolar and manic, this is for you. There are more resources out there to help you through the depressive part, but for someone who has one who is more manic in their life, this book is invaluable. I plan on buying several copies to "lend" to friends and family who don't really "get it". Maybe they can see it explained about a third party better than for someone they know and love and then finally get past the denial (the bipolar person isn't the only one to suffer from denial)!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Doug White on September 26, 2005
Format: Paperback
"What Goes Up" is intelligent and thoughtful. How can a reader's heart not go out to Judy Eron as she chronicles with grace and compassion such a personal tragedy? Many of us know or sometimes encounter others who are bipolar, and this book helps explain not only their struggle but how we might be better prepared for our interactions with them.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Madelaine Pagni on August 31, 2005
Format: Paperback
This is an excellent resource for family members living with a person who is bipolar. Judy Enron explores the manic episodes

of a loved one who goes without his medication and also the downward depression spiral. I admire the candidness of the author.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By North Polar on March 7, 2006
Format: Paperback
Having been diagnosed bipolar, you often wonder how your illness is viewed by those closest to you. Judy does this in this book. I read this book together with my husband. For my husband it was a sort of validation of how he is often left worried and helpless in our situation. For me it was an eye opener to what spouses endure during a crisis. I will be forever reminded the importance of having a good support system in place for my family. It also reinforced that dilligent medication, therapy, love and understanding is so important in maintaining a functionable life. This book not only was helpful to us as a family but to my doctor who found it to be a true testament of the torment that a bipolar family endures. A must read. You will not be disappointed. North Polar Skip
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Patty L. Arthur on September 5, 2005
Format: Paperback
This book helped me to understand, and how to cope with a best friend's manic episode. Very insightful. It talked about many situations that have occurred with my friend. It helped me to see the other side of darkness in my otherwise bright world.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Joyce L'heureux on June 17, 2006
Format: Paperback
This is one of the best written and enjoyable (if this illness can be described as such) books on this subject. I have reread the book many times. After having an experience (and wishing he would "return"), I lived this book a thousand times in my life. From the moment she describes Jim telling her he "disappears" I knew I had a friend. Someone who finally understood what how we love without falling into societies "norm". Judy describes love without fear, and love letting go which is love without the boundaries many place on relationships. I won't even loan this book out of my library for fear it won't be returned.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By James Earl Murdoch on February 5, 2007
Format: Paperback
This open and sharing book "What Goes up ... Surviving the Manic Episode of a Loved One", is a brave offering that should be read by anyone who cares for any of these poor souls; we all need any help we can get; they need even more.

This is a very well written story of one couple's struggle with bipolar illness that is compared and contrasted with other examples as the author tries to make sense of the madness or at least find out how to best deal with it.

I can (personally) only add that every case and every episode (up or down) is unique and nothing is certain until it's too late but as long as there is life there is hope.

Even after thirty years with a bipolar relative, I still learned many things from this book. I highly recommend it for every person who has loved one who suffers from this illness. But, do not stop there, because there are risks of overmedication and differences with the change of life that women go through that can bring out other aspects of the illness.

I have not listed many details from this book because if you need to read it, then you need to read it all; and more.

Thank you Judy Eron, for bravely sharing.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Want to discover more products? Check out this page to see more: bipolar