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497 of 532 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Too Late for Me
Had I had access to the ideas in Marshall Goldsmith's book years ago, I would probably be better off.

At my advanced age, I have spent too much time working for myself. Sure, I recognize the importance of teams and team work. But I refer descending from my aerie, joining the team, completing the project and returning to the solace of personal contemplation...
Published on January 24, 2007 by Craig L. Howe

versus
107 of 124 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Doctor, cure thyself.
It's ironic -- this book is an example of its title. Goldsmith brags endlessly about the wealth and power of his clients, the size of his own fees, and how much more insightful he is than almost everyone else. The book would be much stronger if it had the carefully nuanced conclusions of a scholar. Instead, it has pronouncements from on high. These are meant to be...
Published on May 24, 2008 by DSC46


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497 of 532 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Too Late for Me, January 24, 2007
By 
Craig L. Howe (Darien, CT United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: What Got You Here Won't Get You There: How Successful People Become Even More Successful (Hardcover)
Had I had access to the ideas in Marshall Goldsmith's book years ago, I would probably be better off.

At my advanced age, I have spent too much time working for myself. Sure, I recognize the importance of teams and team work. But I refer descending from my aerie, joining the team, completing the project and returning to the solace of personal contemplation Years ago, I found this works best for me.

Goldsmith, an executive coach, argues in his book What Got You Here Won't Get You There, that success delusion, holds most of us back. We, (read I):

1. Overestimate our (my) contribution to a project.

2. Take credit, partial or complete, for successes that belong to others.

3. Have an elevated opinion of our (my) professional skills and our (my) standing among our (my) peers.

4. Ignore the failures and time-consuming dead-ends we (I) create.

5. Exaggerate our (my) projects' impact on net profits by discounting the real and hidden costs built into them.

All of these flaws are borne out of success, yet here is where the book becomes interesting. Unlike others, Goldsmith does limit himself to teaching us (me) what to do. He goes the next step. He teaches us (me) what to stop. He does not address flaws of skill, intelligence or personality. No, he addresses challenges in interpersonal behavior, those egregious everyday annoyances that make your (my) workplace more noxious that it needs to be. They are the:

1. Need to win at all costs.

2. Desire to add our (my) two cents to every discussion.

3. Need to rate others and impose our standards on them.

4. Needless sarcasm and cutting remarks that we (I) think make us sound witty and wise.

5. Overuse of "No," "But" or "However."

6. Need to show people we (I) are (am) smarter than they think we (I) are (am.)

7. Use of emotional volatility as a management tool.

8. Need to share our (my) negative thoughts, even if not asked.

9. Refusal to share information in order to exert an advantage.

10. Inability to praise and reward.

11. Annoying way in which we overestimate our (my) contribution to any success.

12. Need to reposition our (my) annoying behavior as a permanent fixture so people excuse us for it.

13. Need to deflect blame from ourselves (myself) and onto events and people from our (my) past.

14. Failure to see that we (I) am treating someone unfairly.

15. Inability to take responsibility for our (my) actions.

16. Act of not listening.

17. Failure to express gratitude.

18. Need to attack the innocent, even though they are usually only trying to help us (me).

19. Need to blame anyone but ourselves (me).

20. Excessive need to be "me."

21. Goal obsession at the expense of a larger mission.

It is too late for me. I am too dysfunction. If there is still hope for you, this book is a witty, well-written start to addressing your unconscious, annoying habits that limit your ability to achieve a higher level of success.
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145 of 152 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars You Can Get There From Here, February 1, 2007
This review is from: What Got You Here Won't Get You There: How Successful People Become Even More Successful (Hardcover)
"What Go You Here Won't Get You There" is an exceptional book, a powerhouse of information, insight and instruction.

The author addresses a particular audience: successful people who need to make a change to continue to be successful. It difficult to get people in that group to change, since they have reason to think they're pretty darn good anyway. Additionally, It is difficult to convince them that the very skills that got them where they are may be damaging their current success or preventing them from going further. So when he shows you exactly how to pull off such a miracle, you are going to be extremely impressed.

What is more impressive is the lavish detail Goldsmith provides to help you apply, on your own, the same process which he is paid $250,000 to undertake for each executive he coaches. He gives generously, tells all that you need, holds back nothing relevant. He richly illustrates his points with stories and examples that are so right-on-the-dime that you fully understand each point he makes. Yet, the writing is lean and tightly organized, packed into little over 200 pages.

Since you will want to read the book several times in study mode, the author's ability to be succinct is a very handy feature. And you will want to study the book carefully, because you will understand that this could be a real career-changer for you. In fact, it could be a real life-changer for you. The changes he describes are valuable in anyone's career or in their personal lives. They are all about interpersonal relations.

Goldsmith divides the book into four sections. In section one, he discusses why people resist change, what false beliefs obstruct change and how people have overcome those limiting beliefs. In section two, he lists, defines and describes the twenty most common harmful habits in interpersonal relations, with brief illustrations of how to handle them, specifically. In section three, he explains the change process. Exactly. I stand in awe of his eloquence. This is everything-you-ever-needed-to-learn about how to change. About how to make that change visible to others. About how to enlist others in the process of making the right change and making it last. In section four, he enumerates several important "rules" of change and shares various other analyses and insights that help complete your understanding of why and how to make effective, lasting change. This compendium of wisdom shows you how the author does what he does so well. You will be empowered to do the same for yourself.

You don't need to wait until you're wildly successful and need to break bad habits. Start from wherever you are in your progress through life and career and learn how to be powerfully successful in interpersonal relations by avoiding the bad habits or correcting any you may have.
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239 of 271 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars His best book yet, January 12, 2007
By 
This review is from: What Got You Here Won't Get You There: How Successful People Become Even More Successful (Hardcover)
First, full disclosure: I LOVE Marshall Goldsmith. He is a regular guest speaker at my course "Creativity and Personal Mastery" at both Columbia Business School and London Business School. He generously contributed a blurb for my book "Are YOU Ready to Succeed: Unconventional Strategies for Achieving Personal Mastery in Business and Life". He has given me sage advice many times. He is a good friend and trusted colleague.

Despite our relationship I have not reviewed any of his other books. Most are quite good but I am not sure that I would recommend any with the possible exception of Leader of the Future 1 & 2. (More disclosure - I have a small piece in the latter).

This book is different. Run and get it. I'll tell you why.

Marshall is lean as a rail, bald with a fringe of white hair and he cackles infectiously. If he was in a line up and you were picking persons that you thought would be spellbinding orators, you would pass on him. Yet, clad in his trademark green T-shirt and khaki trousers, he has repeatedly held my entire class in thrall. Many, many persons have told me that they got so much from his talk and thanked me for inviting him.

It is this voice, conversational and common-sensical, that comes through in this book. The same voice comes through in his magazine columns but not in his other books. And it is gold.

His insights are powerful. Here is an example: Have you ever had a subordinate come to you with a great idea? Your eyes light up and you exclaim "Brilliant!" You praise her effusively and suggest ways in which that idea could be made even better. In your mind you are being a supportive boss. Then you sit back and wait for her to follow through. But somehow she doesn't. The excitement and passion are simply not there. You chalk her down as "Lacks implementation effectiveness" and never even consider your own role in this failure. Some variation of this has happened to me many times and I never could figure out why.

What you have done is "added too much value". Your comment of "brilliant" is a judgment and your suggestions for improvement are actually a takeover of her idea. Maybe you improved her original idea by 10% but you reduced her commitment by 50% or more. She no longer feels pride of ownership and this is what is reflected in the lackluster follow on performance.

So what should you do instead? Read the book to find out!!

Here is another example: The entire corporate world is hung up on the notion of feedback. When is the last time you jumped up and down with excitement, singing and dancing, at the thought of receiving 'feedback' from your boss? (You should see Marshall enact this roleplay - he is a SCREAM!!) Feedback brings about anxiety, defensiveness and self-justification. Marshall has a better way - feedforward. In essence the focus is on what needs to be done now to achieve a goal you want to reach instead of what you did right or wrong in the past. Trust me, it works a whole lot better.

There are many, many such insights. I was - and perhaps still am - guilty of "winning too much". I'll bet that you are also. But I am now explicitly aware of it and know that I am better than I was.

The great thing about Marshall's work is that the principles are very easily extrapolable far beyond your worklife. Innumerable persons have become better parents, children and spouses by applying them.

Marshall aims to make you a better manager and a more effective executive. But in the process he also makes you a better human being. And that is why I applaud him so strongly.

[...]
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38 of 41 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Add Good Style to Your Good Substance, February 27, 2007
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)   
This review is from: What Got You Here Won't Get You There: How Successful People Become Even More Successful (Hardcover)
What Got You Here Won't Get You There is an intriguing look into the nuances between those who climb to the top of the corporate ladder and those who fall just short, while everyone applauds their fall. We all have trouble seeing ourselves as others see us. Marshall Goldsmith takes dead aim at that problem by describing his unique methods for coaching candidates for top jobs into the corner offices.

While that's intriguing in and of itself, Dr. Goldsmith also reveals what he usually finds in such detail that you'll see the shadow of yourself spread out across the pavement in front of you. He does this so well that I felt truly mortified to think of the times when I fell for the many bad habits (that stall career and company progress) that he so eloquently describes here.

What are these bad habits? I've paraphrased them below:

Letting winning get in the way of relationships you need

Dropping too many ideas on those who work for you

Being judgmental rather than helpful

Slamming people in public or behind their backs

Making comments that indicate you disagree with everyone that's just been said

Showing off how smart you think you are

Saying anything in anger

Being negative

Keeping secret what others need to know

Not recognizing the contributions others make

Claiming undeserved credit

Refusing to take responsibility for bad results

Being focused on the past

Favoring those who agree with you

Not apologizing

Ignoring what others are saying or shutting them up

Being ungrateful

Shooting the messenger who brings bad news

Blaming others for everything

Insisting on sticking with you bad habits after you're aware of them

Dr. Goldsmith also tells a lot of stories about how he struggles in some of these areas; I thought the best lessons came from those examples. It's clearly a lot easier to describe what needs to be done than to do it.

For those who are or want to be top executive coaches, here's a chance to learn a lot about how a master does it. He relies on lot of 360 degree interviews which are repeated to test for progress (or regression). Dr. Goldsmith also tries to open up bosses, peers, and subordinates so that they try to support the executive who is trying to change.

I was particularly impressed by Dr. Goldsmith's compensation plan: He only gets paid if an executive improves in the eyes of those who work with the executive.

Realize that his perspective is on those who have great technical and leadership skills . . . but who have interpersonal bad habits that are killing performance. Turn some of these negatives into neutrals or less negatives, and great results may follow.

In a sense, this book is a good companion to Know-How by Ram Charan who looks at those who have great interpersonal skills as leaders but don't have the technical ability to know what to do. If you pay attention to the lessons in both books, you'll probably do better.

Ultimately, I was, however, skeptical of Dr. Goldsmith's suggestions for how you might duplicate his process on your own. I suspect you'd be better off to give this book to someone who is a coach and ask them to help you by playing the Marshall Goldsmith role.

Fans of Buddhism will enjoy reading Dr. Goldsmith's many perspectives on executive life drawn from those sources.
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107 of 124 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Doctor, cure thyself., May 24, 2008
By 
This review is from: What Got You Here Won't Get You There: How Successful People Become Even More Successful (Hardcover)
It's ironic -- this book is an example of its title. Goldsmith brags endlessly about the wealth and power of his clients, the size of his own fees, and how much more insightful he is than almost everyone else. The book would be much stronger if it had the carefully nuanced conclusions of a scholar. Instead, it has pronouncements from on high. These are meant to be accepted without question, seemingly because he claims to be a friend of the rich and famous. Maybe this kind of glib, elitist opinion-mongering could be overlooked in a brash youngster, but coming from a would-be elder statesman, it just undercuts his credibility. Which is exactly the point of the book.

To be fair, the book has useful ideas, such as its comprehensive list of "bad habits" that are more damaging at senior levels than at earlier stages of a career. He makes a convincing case that these career-damaging traits can't be changed by taking courses (or reading books?). He argues that change requires nudging by an experienced executive coach (and makes sure you know he is available ... if you have a six-figure budget).

No doubt, Goldsmith can enthrall a room full of worshipful students, as another review suggests, using his catchy one-liners and "trademark" outfits. He is a talented self-promoter. Still, we readers have a right to expect something more thoughtful and less opinionated if he wants to be treated as a truly top authority.

You might want to skim a borrowed copy before buying this. Better still, ask a friend who has read it to give you a brief summary, and maybe skip the book.
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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Holding a mirror up to your life..., October 28, 2007
This review is from: What Got You Here Won't Get You There: How Successful People Become Even More Successful (Hardcover)
It's easy to believe that if you've been successful in some area of life, the process of getting to the next level is just getting better at what got you there. But Marshall Goldsmith makes the point that doing more of the same won't work in the book What Got You Here Won't Get You There: How Successful People Become Even More Successful. I'm inclined to agree with him after reading the book...

Contents:
Section 1 - The Trouble with Success: You Are Here; Enough About You; The Success Delusion, or Why We Resist Change
Section 2 - The Twenty Habits That Hold You Back from the Top: The Twenty Habits; The Twenty-First Habit - Goal Obsession
Section 3 - How We Can Change For The Better: Feedback; Apologizing; Telling The World, or Advertising; Listening; Thanking; Following Up; Practicing Feedforward
Section 4 - Pulling Out the Stops: Changing - The Rules; Special Challenges for People in Charge; Coda - You Are Here Now;
Appendix; Index

Successful people got that way because they are highly skilled at something... decision-making, program design, etc. But there's quite often one or more habits that hold them back from progressing even further than they might otherwise. It may be the company executive that can't quite break into the CEO position. Or perhaps it's the sales person that leads the pack in orders but isn't perceived as a team member. Goldsmith outlines 20 habits that can keep you from making that next step: winning too much, adding too much value, passing judgment, making destructive comments, starting with "no", "but", or "however", telling the world how smart we are, speaking when angry, negativity, or "Let me explain why that won't work", withholding information, failing to give proper recognition, claiming credit that we don't deserve, making excuses, clinging to the past, playing favorites, refusing to express regret, not listening, failing to express gratitude, punishing the messenger, passing the buck, and an excessive need to be "me". After going through each of the habits, he then covers what can be done to identify our problem areas and resolve them.

While reading this, I definitely saw a few of these elements that I need to work on. If I were to couple this with feedback, I'm sure I'd find out even more. Of course, it's easy to fall into the trap of seeing all the flaws of your colleagues here. :) But one statement that Goldsmith said really resonated with me. Often the things you detest in others are indicators of that same flaw in your own life. It's like looking in a mirror and hating what you see. That gem of understanding explains why I have some adverse reactions to certain types of behavior. It's because I hate it when I do it...

If you're willing to hold up the mirror and take an honest look at yourself, this book will give you solid material for personal improvement. You'll also do well if you're willing to let others comment on what they see. It could be exactly what you need to step up to the next level.
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34 of 38 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Lots of Value, Lots of Work, March 29, 2007
This review is from: What Got You Here Won't Get You There: How Successful People Become Even More Successful (Hardcover)
This is not a book for reading or devouring. It is a book for mining.

There is a lot of value here. This book can be the centerpiece of your personal and successful self-development. But it won't be simple and it won't be easy.

Remember that this book is written for a person who has already achieved a high position in a large corporation. Those are Marshall Goldsmith's clients. You will have to decide what you have in common with them at this stage in your life. You will have to filter some of the advice so that it fits your situation.

There's plenty here for you no matter where you are or what your current situation is. But, you need to take time to understand how your situation differs from the intended audience. And you need a strategy for getting the most out of the book.

Late in the book, writing about the rules for success, Goldsmith advises that "You can only hit one target at a time." That should have been way up front instead of way in the back.

If you read this book in the normal way, from front to back, you are likely to get overwhelmed or bored or both. So, here's my suggestion about how to get the most out of it.

Read the first couple of chapters if you want to, but if you start getting a little tired of the flat prose or if you can't identify with the corporate stars that Marshall coaches, jump to Section Three:, How We Change for the Better. Skim that section.

Then go back to Section Two: What's holding us back. Review the list of Annoying Habits, el al. Pick one to work on. Return to Section Three for guidance in how to do that most effectively.

This strategy will work. But beware, this book could become the most dog-eared one on your shelf while you use it for a lifetime of self-improvement.
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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This was eye opening, February 7, 2007
This review is from: What Got You Here Won't Get You There: How Successful People Become Even More Successful (Hardcover)
Reality strikes you quickly when reading this book. Many success books focus on mantras like "You're in it to win" and "Toot your own horn" and "Never regret only learn". While these are good suggestions, they appear shallow after reading Marchall Goldsmith's book. For example he suggests that you can win too much, you can talk too much about yourself and you can focus too much on learning from your mistakes and not enough on admitting them to your peers and employees. This is valuable advice.

The author separates goal obsession as a distinct problem because many people become so focused on accomplishing a goal that they forget the mission. This can easily happen. For example, you may want to become a manager or executive manager some day and so you decide to go back to college. However, ten months later, when you are making decisions about the classes to take, you find yourself selecting classes you think you would enjoy instead of classes that will give you the skills you'll need as an executive manager. Why? You're focugin on the goal of getting that advanced degree and not on the mission of becoming an exectutive manager.

The author gives the solution of F\feedback. The suggestion is that we cannot know how we really are in the workplace and life without feedback. This feedback can come from our managers, peers and employees. It can come from our family, friends and neighbors. He suggests that the feedback process should involve four commitments:

-Let go of the past

-Tell the truth

-Be supportive and helpful - not cynical or negative

-Pick something to improve yourself - so everyone is focused more on improving than judging

From here, the author moves on to specific actions such as apologizing and listening that will help you get "there".

Finally, the book reveals change and how to accomplish it in personal ways. Overall, I felt the book was enlightening and well worth the read. It does take the phrase, "If you keep doing what you've always done, you'll keep getting what you've always got" to a new level. Tom Carpenter.
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27 of 33 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars 4 page article stretched (painfully) to book size, February 28, 2008
This review is from: What Got You Here Won't Get You There: How Successful People Become Even More Successful (Hardcover)
This book, like many others of similar genre, take an article's worth of useful info and stretch it out over 100's of pages in order to sell it for more money. I found the writing redundant and patronizing, causing me to speed read from major point to major point. I don't mind examples, alternate explanations, and the odd antecdote but this book is ridiculous.

Usefulness of the info: 4/5
Value: 2/5
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21 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, Truly Excellent - ORIGINAL & DARING!!!!!, April 7, 2007
This review is from: What Got You Here Won't Get You There: How Successful People Become Even More Successful (Hardcover)
Marshall Goldsmith's book is ORIGINAL, and adds strongly to the body of literature dealing with ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR. In fact, Goldsmith has a PhD in the subject. When you read a book, you know you are onto something when the author's whole thrust flys in the face of what you the reader personally believe. When this happens, you have to make sure you maintain an OPEN MIND. Goldsmith caused me many problems while trying to absorb his information, but that's a good thing.

NOT A "FEEL GOOD" BOOK but VERY USEFUL

In spite of the title which is both flashy and catchy, this is not a rah, rah, let's go get them feel good book. This one has depth, and there is a lot of meat on the bone. We as readers must be daring enough to work our way through the author's concepts. Goldsmith has credentials though. The Wall Street Journal called him a "top- ten executive educator, while Forbes picked him as one of the five most respected executive coaches. The central theme of this book is simply this:

The CENTRAL CHARACTER TRAIT that you believe got you to the POSITION that you currently hold, may very well be the SAME trait, that is HOLDING YOU BACK from WHERE you want to be.

We should all read the above central theme again, and again. Goldsmith will hammer us with it throughout his work. He doesn't mention this, but he is taking his basic theory from renowned psychoanalyst CARL JUNG. If you are interested, read any of Jung's work regarding the SHADOW. If you are into personal development, nothing is more powerful than Jung's shadow work.

When you read this book, you will find that it is basically divided into 3 parts:

* PART I

In Part I, the author is laying out the psychological underpinning of the "The "Trouble with Success". This is the section where he hammers home that once you achieve a distinct level of success, you need new skills to get you to the next level, hence the title of the book. Some of the key in this section are:

A) "HERE" can be a great place. "THERE" can be a better place

B) He's dead on accurate when he described Chevy Chase's fading career, and attributed it to "Chase's losing touch with what he was projecting to people."

C) A famous journalist taught him that in a long distinguished career, the most important thing he learned was that, "Put a comma in the wrong place, and the whole sentence is screwed up."

D) "Our delusions become a serious liability when we need to change. We sit there with the same godlike feelings, and when someone tries to make us change our ways, we regard them with unadulterated bafflement."

E) "To successful people, past is always prologue." This is an amazing statement because it is profound.

F) The author does have wonderful humor. In this section he talked about a certain belief and said, "This belief makes about as much sense as inheriting money and thinking you're a self-made man."

* PART II

Part II is an attempt to list 20 HABITS that hold you back from the TOP. Let's just mention a few of them.

A) WINNING TOO MUCH - Our need to win overwhelms our common sense. The author believes that it may be built into our DNA, but in the end, it can limit our success

B) STARTING WITH "NO, BUT, or HOWEVER" - In this section, he is saying that whenever somebody says anything, and you respond by beginning a sentence with any of these three words, NO, BUT, or HOWEVER, you are telling the other person that they are WRONG. Goldsmith is taking this from Neuro Linguistic Programming (NLP), another subject you might want to study.

C) SPEAKING WHEN ANGRY - It is not possible to predict another person's reaction to ANGER. People may shut down on you; therefore anger stunts your ability to change.

D) NEGATIVITY - It was one of the great lines of the book, but the author said for some people, "Negativity is their DEFAULT response." Nobody wants to be around anybody who is negative.

E) FAILING TO GIVE PROPER RECOGNITION - Recognition brings CLOSURE, and people need closure. People need the "Emotional payoff that comes with success," and that's RECOGNITION.

* PART III & PART IV

Once you know the 20 habits that are holding you back, you need to institute a program that helps you change. What good is knowledge that is not ACTIONABLE?

Part III and Part IV helps you effectuate change by teaching you 7 behaviors you can institute immediately. The behaviors are:

1) Feedback

2) Apologizing

3) Telling the World, or Advertising

4) Listening

5) Thanking

6) Following Up

7) Practicing Feedforward

CONCLUSION

Goldsmith the author has given us some original material here. It is not reworked jargon, which some other authors are prone to do. I feel the discussion of the 20 Habits that prevent you from getting to the TOP were by themselves worth the price of the book.

For me Part III and IV dealing with specific procedures to deal with our issues were not as well done as Part II dealing with the 20 Habits. This is not a negative, as anyone that has ever been through therapy knows. It's always easier to identify the issues we have to deal with than to actually EFFECTUATE CHANGE. We all know that. In any event, READ this WONDERFUL book, and I wish you GOOD LUCK IN YOUR JOURNEY.

Richard Stoyeck
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