Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Qty:1
  • List Price: $16.00
  • Save: $6.13 (38%)
FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books.
Only 8 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
What Makes Sammy Run? has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Like new condition. No marks or annotations
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

What Makes Sammy Run? Paperback – December 6, 1993

4.4 out of 5 stars 69 customer reviews

See all 43 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$9.87
$5.57 $0.01
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
$4.00
Audio CD
"Please retry"
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$5.99

The Alaskan Laundry by Brendan Jones
"The Alaskan Laundry" by Brendan Jones
A fresh debut novel about a lost, fierce young woman who finds her way to Alaska and finds herself through the hard work of fishing, as far as the icy Bering Sea. Learn more | See related books
$9.87 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. Only 8 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • What Makes Sammy Run?
  • +
  • Twilight: Los Angeles, 1992
Total price: $20.29
Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

From the Inside Flap

What Makes Sammy Run?
Everyone of us knows someone who runs. He is one of the symp-toms of our times--from the little man who shoves you out of the way on the street to the go-getter who shoves you out of a job in the office to the Fuehrer who shoves you out of the world. And all of us have stopped to wonder, at some time or another, what it is that makes these people tick. What makes them run?
This is the question Schulberg has asked himself, and the answer is the first novel written with the indignation that only a young writer with talent and ideals could concentrate into a manuscript. It is the story of Sammy Glick, the man with a positive genius for being a heel, who runs through New York's East Side, through newspaper ranks and finally through Hollywood, leaving in his wake the wrecked careers of his associates; for this is his tragedy and his chief characteristic--his congenital incapacity for friendship.
An older and more experienced novelist might have tempered his story and, in so doing, destroyed one of its outstanding qualities. Compromise would mar the portrait of Sammy Glick. Schulberg has etched it in pure vitriol, and dissected his victim with a precision that is almost frightening.
When a fragment of this book appeared as a short story in a national magazine, Schulberg was surprised at the number of letters he received from people convinced they knew Sammy Glick's real name. But speculation as to his real identity would be utterly fruitless, for Sammy is a composite picture of a loud and spectacular minority bitterly resented by the many decent and sincere artists who are trying honestly to realize the measureless potentialities of motion pictures. Tothis group belongs Schulberg himself, who has not only worked as a screen writer since his graduation from Dartmouth College in 1936, but has spent his life, literally, in the heart of the motion-picture colony. In the course of finding out what makes Sammy run (an operation in which the reader is spared none of the grue-some details) Schulberg has poured out everything he has felt about that place. The result is a book which the publishers not only believe to be the most honest ever written about Hollywood, but a penetrating study of one kind of twentieth-century success that is peculiar to no single race of people or walk of life.

"From the Hardcover edition.

About the Author

Budd Schulberg was one of the most talented American writers of the twentieth century. In addition to authoring numerous literary works (including "What Makes Sammy Run?" and the screenplay for "On the Waterfront"), Schulberg was also a talented sportswriter and boxing correspondent for "Sports Illustrated". He was inducted into the Boxing Hall of Fame in 2002.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE


Product Details

  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage (December 6, 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0679734228
  • ISBN-13: 978-0679734222
  • Product Dimensions: 5.1 x 0.7 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (69 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #133,685 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
She was being interviewed by Dick Cavett and described this as the definitive insider's view of the Hollywood's darker nature: So you know it is an honest take. F.Scott Fitzgerald's recommendation is noted on the front cover: So you know it is well written. Written in the 1940's it created quite the explosion back then. Dorothy Parker also recommends it: So you know it is devilishly clever. Now I know why Martin Short named his Hollywood gossip columnist character Jiminy Glick.
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
A lot of the buzz on this book seems to be because of the backstage Hollywood setting, but Sammy Glick would have been a predator in any environment he was loosened upon. Schulbergs portrayal of the New York newspaper trade as well as the early tinsletown where Sammy prowls is insightful and witty, but the great force of the book is always What Makes Sammy Run? After reading this you will begin to recognize the Sammy Glicks in the world around you, and the question may haunt you sixty years after it was first asked.
1 Comment 18 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I highly recommend "What Makes Sammy Run" for anyone who is an aspiring actor or filmmaker. This novel is an interesting look at the early entertainment business. Reading about Sammy Glick as he pursues success in show business is a real eye-opener. And things have not changed all that much these days. The movers and the shakers in the biz still behave in a similar manner. This is an interesting book to learn about what really makes the Entertainment Industry tick. Even though this novel takes place in the 1930s, it is still a great learning tool for today. And it is also a great look into history. This book is a great Hollywood classic.
Comment 22 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This book is a real experience. Even though it was written decades ago, it is timeless because its characters are timeless. Everybody has known a "Sammy" in his lifetime. A real beautifully written classic.
Comment 13 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Sammy Glick is a sociopath - he has no conscience or empathy. We deal with sociopaths everyday - one person in 25 is a sociopath - so there is value to understanding sociopaths. Schulberg resists the temptation to make Sammy change, to redeem Sammy. Instead Schulberg gives you the roller coaster of dealing with a sociopath; every time he seems trapped and you think Sammy will change, he wiggles out. It is an important lesson - sociopaths don't change.

Pairing the sociopath, Sammy, with the codependent, Al, is brilliant. You catch yourself rooting for Al to leave Sammy alone, to forget him. He can't he is a codependent. Al does show some capacity for growth. Even though Al is always more dependent on Kit than she is on him, he does maneuver the relationship into a more equal relationship.

Julian is a warning to those who think talent is enough. He fades from the story just like young talent who insist that the world is fair. Self defense is always justified. There is no honor in being a victim.

Schulberg picked Hollywood because he knew it the best. Sammy would be Sammy regardless of the industry he picked. Using Hollywood illustrates that studios have little interest in quality - they are sales driven. Sammy gets promoted based on box office success, not the critical acclaim. The media can be bought and manipulated. Sammy does both.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Most "classics" have a bad reputation. They are praised to high heaven in textbooks and literary publications...and force-fed to students in literature classes. But this book is as fresh, hilarious and biting as if it were written this season. It moves at a brisk pace and holds you to the end. What a REAL classic should be.
Comment 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Just finished this excellent book after it was recommended to me via Ryan Holiday. It's a quick read, and I was hooked after the first paragraph:

"The first time I saw him he couldn't have been much more than sixteen years old, a little ferret of a kid, sharp and quick. Sammy Glick. Used to run copy for me. Always ran. Always looked thirsty."

Glick is larger-than-life in the same way Gatsby was, and Schulberg uses the first person narration of Al Menheim in a similar way to how Fitzgerald used Nick, with Menheim taking on the role of introspective observer to Sammy Glick's seemingly unstoppable rise to the top of Hollywood. I was a little disappointed that the last page didn't feature a clear cut answer to the book's recurring question: "What makes Sammy run?" But despite my disappointed the ending still offers a sizable payoff regarding the nature of ambition and human relationships, one that I will take with me even after the rest of the book has faded from my mind.

Of course I've just finished "Sammy," so I'll need some time to let it sink in, but I feel this book is destined to be added to my list great novels that say something definitive about a part of the human condition.

The Great Gatsby = the unattainability of fantasy
Fight Club = the emptiness of the safe corporate/factory life
A Separate Peace = the corruption of envy and the impermanence of innocence
What makes Sammy Run? = the emptiness of success when it comes at the cost of human relationships

Read this book.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
"You think more like a man than any woman I've ever known -- and most men."

"If you think that's a compliment, you're crazy," she said. "Every time a man discovers that a woman thinks, the only way he can explain it is that she happens to have a male mind. You just don't know me, Al. I'm feminine as all hell."

Budd Schulberg. What Makes Sammy Run? Vintage Book. (1990). p. 131.

Schulberg earned critical success and notoriety with his first novel,What Makes Sammy Run? at the tender age of 24. Sammy is a searing exposé on writers in Hollywood and of the 'American Dream.' Schulberg spares no details in revealing the costs of ambition and achieving commercial success in the City of Angels. Behind the rhetorical question of what makes us run, Schulberg illustrates the rise and decline of one Sammy Glick, from a cocky copy boy to sociopath mogul. The effortless writing, while lacking at times in character development, showcases excellent editing, where not a word is wasted. Glick is not unlike Lonesome Rhodes in his chameleon morals and manipulation, another character in the Schulberg short story 'Your Arkansas Traveler', which provided the basis for the 1957 Andy Griffith and Patricia Neal film A Face in the Crowd. At the time Glick appeared, everyone knew that Schulberg had modeled his main character on the infamous Jerry Wald. For those readers who adore F. Scott Fitzgerald, Schulberg wrote The Disenchanted which chronicled, in loose terms, Budd's relationship with the great writer in his decline. Readers may find Schulberg's role during the McCarthy-era interesting. What Makes Sammy Run? remains a compelling and relevant read.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

What Makes Sammy Run?
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
This item: What Makes Sammy Run?

Pages with Related Products. See and discover other items: urban books paperback