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What They Don't Teach You At Harvard Business School: Notes From A Street-Smart Executive Paperback – June 1, 1986


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What They Don't Teach You At Harvard Business School: Notes From A Street-Smart Executive + What They Still Don't Teach You At Harvard Business School + Swim with the Sharks Without Being Eaten Alive: Outsell, Outmanage, Outmotivate, and Outnegotiate Your Competition (Collins Business Essentials)
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Bantam; Reissue edition (June 1, 1986)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0553345834
  • ISBN-13: 978-0553345834
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 0.8 x 6.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (42 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #16,871 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

'Mark McCormack is an entrepreneur extraordinaire' Daily Telegraph --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Inside Flap

Listen to Mark McCormack as he tells you how to read people, create the right first impression, and take the leading edge and run meetings. Based on his proven method of applied people sense to get things done, McCormack presents powerful street-smart insights into successful selling. McCormack shares his experience, technique, and wisdom in a practical, how-to manner. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Gerard Kroese on March 27, 2002
Format: Paperback
Mark McCormack is Founder, Chairman and CEO of sports marketing company International Management Group (IMG). He was named 'the most powerful man in sports' by Sports Illustrated.
In this book McCormack does not so much criticize Harvard Business School as the title suggests, but complements the traditional business school-education with 'street smarts' - "the ability to make active, positive use of your instincts, insights, and perceptions." (Funnily enough, McCormack did not even attend the HBS, he has a law degree from Yale.) "My main purpose in writing this book is to fill in many of the gaps - the gaps between a business school education and the street knowledge that comes from day-to-day experience of running a business and managing people." He splits the 'street smarts' and this book up into three parts: People, sales and negotiation, and running a business. With each part consisting of 4-to-6 chapters.
In the first part McCormack discusses matters related to people, such as reading people, creating impressions, preparation for business situations, and improving your career. "Business situations always come down to people situations. And the more - and the sooner - I know about the person I am dealing with, the more effective I'm going to be." In the second part of the book - Sales and Negotiation - the author dicusses sales, negotiations and marketing. Sales and negotiations are probably the strongest point of both the book and McCormack, he really excels here. ...The third part of the book - Running a Business - is probably the weakest part of the book. Although there are some great one-liners, it is clear that the author is not that much at ease with writing about organization structures, policies and procedures. In fact, it looks like he despises most of these subjects.
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful By William B Hughes on December 12, 2000
Format: Paperback
This was one of the first business/management books I purchasd upon my graduation from college in 1988. Since that time, I find myself reading the book atleast once every 12 to 18 months to refreash my memory as well as my attitude. Mark's common sense straight forward approach is second to none! This book made such an impression on me that it is now required reading for all of my managemnet personnel and all new hires are given a copy on their start date of employment with my company.
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34 of 41 people found the following review helpful By Dagbone on February 29, 2000
Format: Paperback
I eagerly made my way through this book, in search of insights that might live up to the intriguing title of this book. What I found disappointed me: rather blasé anecdotes that seemed to be saying, "Look at me... see what I've done? Aren't I something?" Mark McCormack has obviously achieved great success, but his musings left me unfulfilled just the same. The basic premise of this book (listen to and take care of people, and beware arrogance) is sound, but for hard-hitting, meaty commentary, I'd look elsewhere.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Nannette Moran on May 29, 2005
Format: Paperback
It's an easy reader. It offers some valuable tips from this guy who has more money than me, right? He says things like "middle managers make the HUGE mistake of knowing what they shouldn't say and saying it anyway"; I used to do that. "Laughter in intense situations is key"; I made the whole group crack up at a corporate training. "Timing is everything so be aware of the benefit to you in timing". I'm paraphrasing of course but I love this book. I took notes, I highlighted, I memorized. I read it often and if I lost it I'd buy another. It's fun. Worth the money and the time.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By P. Gungor on April 23, 2004
Format: Paperback
This book is somewhat over-rated. Some of the chapters are just common sense. But there are also some tricks in 'sales'. The book emphasizes on silence and importance of the silence in negotiation.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 23, 2002
Format: Paperback
This is a good if over-rated book. If a lot of what he recommends here isn't already instinctive in you, you probably weren't meant to be an entrepreneur. He goes on endlessly about how you should be as silent as much as possible in negotiations. I went into negotiations after reading that thinking that's what I'd better do. Then I realized that's what I'd been doing the whole time without having to be told. An arrogance bleeds through the lines a bit too often. And being a sports agent, to me, is about as frivolous a profession as there could be. When I first heard the term "sports agent" I literally thought it was a joke. Bill Murray said the reason Mike Ovitz failed as an executive at Disney is, "He went from a simple commission business as a talent agent to the much more complex business of Disney. That's why he failed." And McCormack runs a talent agency, basically. And a lot of readers will probably be involved in much more complex businesses, for whom his advice will be dubious at best. But with those major reservations, I still think it's a book worth reading.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By stoic VINE VOICE on May 13, 2009
Format: Paperback
In What They Don't Teach You at Harvard Business School, Mark McCormack offers readers advice on how to interact with others on the job. McCormack organizes the material into many short, interesting sections and that makes What They Don't an "easy read". The book's organization makes it easy to resume reading after one has set it aside for a while. What They Don't would make a good beach book (at least for people who can stand reading about business at the beach).

The book also offers some good suggestions. I particularly liked McCormack's discussion of three hard-to-say phrases ("I don't know," "I need help," and "I was wrong"); most people will probably find themselves recounting times when those phrases would have prevented heartache on their jobs. I also enjoyed McCormack's advice on negotiation, the need to be organized, and the power of silence in interpersonal communication.

Unfortunately, I have to agree with those reviewers who have pointed out the book's shortcomings. While McCormack's advice generally is good, he is an egotist and a self promoter. McCormack spends pages bragging about the insights he possesses that others lack and he also constantly "name drops" (Arnold Palmer, John DeLorean, Roone Arledge, etc.). Furthermore, while McCormack offers his readers advice on many topics, he attempts to cover so much ground that there is little depth in most of the material.

In summary, if readers can get around McCormack's ego, they will find some straightforward, thought-provoking advice in What They Don't Teach You at Harvard Business School.
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