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What I Wish I Knew When I Was 20 [Kindle Edition]

Tina Seelig
4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (128 customer reviews)

Print List Price: $22.99
Kindle Price: $11.99
You Save: $11.00 (48%)
Sold by: HarperCollins Publishers
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Book Description

Major life transitions such as leaving the protected environment of school or starting a new career can be daunting. It is scary to face a wall of choices, knowing that no one is going to tell us whether or not we are making the right decision. There is no clearly delineated path or recipe for success. Even figuring out how and where to start can be a challenge. That is, until now.

As executive director of the Stanford Technology Ventures Program, Tina Seelig guides her students as they make the difficult transition from the academic environment to the professional world, providing tangible skills and insights that will last a lifetime. Seelig is an entrepreneur, neuroscientist, and popular teacher, and in What I Wish I Knew When I Was 20 she shares with us what she offers her students—provocative stories, inspiring advice, and a big dose of humility and humor.

These pages are filled with fascinating examples, from the classroom to the boardroom, of individuals defying expectations, challenging assumptions, and achieving amazing success. Seelig throws out the old rules and provides a new model for reaching our highest potential. We discover how to have a healthy disregard for the impossible, how to recover from failure, and how most problems are remarkable opportunities in disguise.

What I Wish I Knew When I Was 20 is a much-needed book for everyone looking to make their mark on the world.



Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Seelig, executive director of the entrepreneurship center at Stanford's School of Engineering, presents a thoughtful, concise set of observations for those making the unsteady transition to adulthood. While the majority of her advice is intended for would-be entrepreneurs, her accessible lessons should come in handy for those in any field, as well as those still trying to decide on a field. Culled from her personal experience as an entrepreneur and teacher, as well as the stories of entrepreneurs and students she knows, Seelig avoids (and at times dissects) cliché and provides informative discussion throughout, despite a narrower focus than readers might expect. A chapter on acknowledging, learning from, and even seeking out failure ("Fail fast and frequently") provides valuable advice and comfort for the fearful, including Seelig's own "failure resumé" (broken into professional, academic and personal failures). The chapter titled "Don't listen to career advice" helps readers avoid the pitfalls of oft-heard, wrong-headed maxims like "follow your passions" and "stick to the plan." Readers will either be relieved or frustrated that Seelig doesn't provide any numbered steps, bullet-pointed recaps or self-assessment quizzes, but she makes the most of her knowledge and authority with a friendly, efficient voice.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

“Wise, witty and packed with stories of those who are making a difference and some who are making a fortune...The only trouble is that you will need two dozen copies to give to everyone.”

Product Details

  • File Size: 478 KB
  • Print Length: 212 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0062047418
  • Publisher: HarperCollins e-books (May 5, 2009)
  • Sold by: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0028MVGZQ
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #19,710 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
116 of 139 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Can't Wait to Innovate! April 17, 2009
Format:Hardcover
Reorient your brain and body to creativity and innovation!
This book will make you want to become an innovator so bad.

I'm a 20-year-old Stanford sophomore who learned what Tina wished she had known when she was 20.

As a freshman, I took her class "Creativity & Innovation," mainly offered for graduate students. When, on the first day, Tina said "Creativity can be learned," I was skeptical. I simply thought her class would be no different from typical college classes with competitive individuals, problem sets, and grade curves.

The class was given the first assignment to come up with the best and the worst business ideas. My teammates and I were enthusiastic about developing fantastic ideas and scribbled total nonsense for the bad ideas when the time was running out.

I was baffled, however, when Tina ripped up all sheets of paper with the good ideas and gave us the bad idea submitted by another team. The idea was "selling used hypodermic needles." We laughed out loud at how terrible it was until three seconds later when we all turned silent and questioned, "Wait, is this really the worst idea?" We ended up coming up with a really clever plan that involved selling used needles to doctors who need small tissue and blood samples for their experiments. We even felt as if we could start selling used needles right away! Besides learning that it is always worthwhile to question our assumptions, my classmates and I were no longer competitors but awesome business partners!

Tina taught us that there are no bad ideas and how to redefine problems in different ways. In following assignments we got to redesign the cover for a large national magazine (and they even used our idea!
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24 of 26 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Needs to be shrunk to a 20-page brochure June 13, 2013
Format:Hardcover
- Watery book, especially the first seven chapters.

- Signal-to-noise ratio low.

- Good pointers in chapter 8, though somewhat loosely written, unclear.

- The remaining two chapters of the book not w/o substance but very diluted with verbiage.

- Many touching PC examples of amazing do-gooderism, suitably "diversified" and multi-culti. Feels legendary, fairy-tale-like (e.g., graduating w/ a PhD from Yale, dropping everything, buying one-way ticket to Afghanistan (yep), decamping there with no specific plans or anyone waiting for you, all of it with the goal to help poor Afghan people. Well... in reality that would end up with being blown up on IED and having one's head cut off by local mujahideen there, preceded by a gang rape in case of a female. But hey, that's an advice book, right? So, OK, another do-gooder s'en va-t-en guerre, or at least such is the tale -- fine, PC content requirement satisfied; moving on. Btw, this brings to mind Emerson's "thy love abroad is spite at home" -- why not save on plane tickets and commit all do-gooderisms in your favourite friendly neighborhood trailer park located but a stone throw away from your posh and tony gated community of care-filled do-gooders so concerned about "disenfranchised" and so excellently "progressive"? S'pose doesn't sound as majical and good overall. Maybe something else. Who knows. Annoying histrionics and probably not true.

- Written OK, though obviously with the goal in mind of fattening an article into a book.

- Many references to BS "advice" books by dudes like Randy Commissaire or this lifelong Californian hack with an over-inflated Apple past whose name I forget (kinda like motorcycle).
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25 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Practical Passion October 30, 2009
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
How many times have we heard the expression, "Follow your Bliss" (at least you hear it alot in LA where I live!!) but where is the practicality in that, especially in today's economy?? I thoroughly enjoyed Tina Seelig's wisdom and realistic inspiration throughout "What I Wish I Knew When I Was 20" but especially on this topic. Tina says, "It's important to know whether you're putting energy into something that has the potential to pay off. This is one of life's biggest challenges...it's always a mammoth challenge to separate your desire to make something work from the reality of the probability that it will work." I have seen that with many career twists and turns before I found the job that utilizes my skills best and is something the world wants and will pay nicely for. Tina's book helps you to look at what isn't working in your career and turn it around to your benefit.
I enjoyed Tina's viewpoint about being practical with risk-taking too while not letting risk restrain your potential.
She says that if you are going to take the high-risk/high reward road, only do so if you're willing to live with all the potential consequences. You should fully prepare for the downside and have a backup plan in place. Tina writes, "Experts in risk management believe you should make decisions based upon the probability of all outcomes.including the best and worst-case scenarios, and be willing to take big risks when you are fully prepared for all eventualities."
If you want a roadmap to a great career looking at the big picture vision without losing sight of necessary practical details and passion along the way, I highly recommend Tina's book.
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars I love the Stanford connection and I bet I have given ...
I give this book to kids as High School graduation presents, and to Eagle Scouts, and I have given many to adults in transition because of job change, divorce, or whatever. Read more
Published 10 days ago by sc-sld
4.0 out of 5 stars Valuable Insights
This was a pretty enjoyable read with insights I identify with and hope to identify with in the future. Read more
Published 1 month ago by ADJ
1.0 out of 5 stars One Star
Not at all I expected.
Published 1 month ago by Howard Bailey
5.0 out of 5 stars Glad to have read it at 50.
Really an inspiring book. I do wish I had read it when I was 20 though I am still glad to have read it now. I would recommend this book for readers of any age.
Published 1 month ago by Dangostar
1.0 out of 5 stars One Star
Very dissapointed
Published 2 months ago by unk
5.0 out of 5 stars Got it last month and loved it!
Seriously a must read. I'm studying entrepreneurship in college right now and I just ate this book up! I ordered it last month and read it in a few weeks. Read more
Published 2 months ago by Jordan Todd Woods
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Excelente boom for entrepreneurs!
Published 3 months ago by Alejandro Castagneris
5.0 out of 5 stars A prefect gift for your twenty-something kids!
So what if you missed it when you were 20!!
Published 3 months ago by Shailesh Trivedi
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
A great book!
Published 3 months ago by Angela
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
excellent
Published 4 months ago by Miss Cheryl Lynn
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