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What is the age range for Nintendo DS?


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Showing 1-25 of 33 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Oct 15, 2008 10:43:09 AM PDT
A. Notle says:
All three of my kids want a Nintendo Ds for Christmas this year. I am wondering if it is a good idea for a 5 1/2 yr old girl. Does anyone have experience with younger kids and Nintendo DS?

Posted on Apr 25, 2010 9:48:28 AM PDT
Miss Liz says:
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Posted on Aug 19, 2010 8:54:34 PM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on Mar 10, 2013 1:06:32 AM PST]

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 19, 2010 9:05:24 PM PDT
Saying that video games hinder a child's development is like saying that guns kill people (when, of course, people kill people with their guns, as the now-cliche argument goes). A kid who becomes addicted to video games is the product of lazy parenting, not the victim of modern pop culture. There's absolutely nothing wrong with a kid having a Nintendo DS (or any other video game system), just as long as his/her gaming is regulated by the parent(s). It's harmless fun when done in moderation, and will seem even more harmless and less detrimental to their health once they get old enough to start having sex, doing drugs, etc. The people who deride video games today had grandparents who once said the same thing about the "dangers" of watching TV. Every generation has a new piece of technology that the previous generation does not understand, and this will likely continue ad nauseum.

Posted on Aug 23, 2010 7:27:09 AM PDT
Kakilefe says:
I must add that kids who are not given this junk: game systems, excessive TV time, and other such crutches for boredom, learn how to entertain themselves in a healthier manner to such an extent that they often give the parent the free time the parent desires ANYWAY. Reading comes faster, books are better results from boredom than pulling out the DS system you can't live without (until it breaks then everyone is freaked out)
Would you rather the kid be absorbed by train tracks or some of the more traditional, teaching basic, building games, or train them to the screen zombie mode we all know (and feel bad about when nothing gets done?)
Trust me: the time will come when they can be game junkies, but if you wait, they will develop habits that are creative, productive, and useful, and have the fortification to be WITHOUT the game world when they hit the REAL world.
On another note: boredom is one of the healthiest things that can happen to a kid: adults have a hard time learning to deal with that time between things when we can't do anything we might want to. The best training for this can happen in childhood and will make life easier for the parent at older ages. Unfortunately, we young adults in today's society suffer learning boredom the hard way (at the same time we're trying to find better things to do than these computer games we've been addicted to all our lives).
I must also mention the materialistic / cost basis side of all this. Save the $150 for their college and it will grow and pay for classes. Teach your child by example to invest instead of spend on frivolous, useless stuff that can break easier than library books. Take it from me: they will appreciate it when they're older, the same as they'll appreciate your strict discipline that gave them the example they needed to discipline themselves when the time called for it.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 29, 2010 8:10:16 AM PDT
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Posted on Sep 3, 2010 11:14:28 AM PDT
so did anyone actually answer the initial question about the age range for the DS? Jeez

Posted on Sep 6, 2010 7:16:35 PM PDT
Susan Gomez says:
I think is is fine for a 5 1/2 year old girl, just make sure to purchase games within her age group, they have great learning games for kids and adults alike.

Posted on Oct 10, 2010 2:54:12 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 10, 2010 3:01:04 AM PDT
Tany Harris says:
Are you guys kidding me?
First thing, there's no specific age range for the DS because it caters the very young to the very old. There's a lot, I repeat A LOT of educational games for kids from the age of 2 (development stage) to teens (Math,SAT preparation, TOEFL, etc) to young adults and older generation (stuff like brain training, language training etc). Good thing about DS is that it has a lot of educational titles and game titles, so if you're worried about your kids wasting time, buy them educational title in the form of fun games! Geez, why are all the ridiculous excuses to condemn the DS? PS3 or Xbox maybe, as they have lots of games but DS is a great learning tool. If you're unable to control your kids, and make full use of the system to their benefit, it's your own fault, not the DS. I grew up with games, almost always on the computer and now I have so much passion in computers, yet I didn't grow up stupid or 'wild'. In fact, I have games to thank to because it has always stimulate my brain, allows me to think more creatively (i'm a designer now), fast and strategically.. I was also in dean's list in college.. so who says being addicted to games can have a bad effect? You only have yourself to blame if you're unable to not let games have a complete control of your life. Stop giving excuses and blaming things, because this is the problem with our society...blaming other things but themselves. Like someone said above, guns don't kill people.. people kill people. Japanese people let their BABIES play DS (don't believe? do a search on youtube) yet the Japanese are one of the smartest people in the world when it comes to technologies. They invented the DS you know............ and the upcoming 3DS...

So to answer the poster's question or anyone with the same question, yes, it's a good idea to give the DS to younger kids IF you know how to make use of it to their benefit. Kids prefer learning stuff the fun way, so why force them to read boring books when they could have fun and learn and think creatively at the same time? I've tried most of the games for kids and I can say that I wish I had the DS to learn when I was young. I played a training game for Japanese preschoolers, they're so much fun and learning their hiragana & basic words is so much fun than a plain text book.

Posted on Oct 27, 2010 7:34:01 AM PDT
LynnJynh9315 says:
Here's another question: what is age range for a child watching films. In both questions, the answer varies greatly. The Nintendo DS is merely a conduit through which one plays games. The question you should be asking is what games are appropriate for a 5-6 year old.

Whenever someone buys a DS, I also like to mention the differences between the DS Lite and DSi. The DSi has a camera and internet capability (seriously, what gadgets don't nowadays?), but the DS Lite is capable of playing Gameboy Advance games... useful since alot of the classic Mario and Zelda were rereleased on GBA (and what is a Nintendo with Mario or Zelda, afterall?)

Posted on Mar 27, 2011 10:27:35 PM PDT
Marvolon says:
I'll be twenty soon and I still love my DS Lite...It really depends. There are game for young kids, pre-teens, teenagers, and a few for the adults. So I'd say anyone could have one and enjoy it as long as they generally like video games.

Posted on Apr 15, 2011 7:16:40 PM PDT
joc says:
Ready to buy first Nintendo for my kids (5 and 7). Which to buy -- DS, DS Lite, 3DS, ????

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 27, 2011 8:12:59 PM PDT
Shelley K. says:
My 5 year old is asking for a DS, so for Christmas I may buy one. I am just trying to figure out which one to buy.

Posted on Jun 7, 2011 9:00:40 AM PDT
My son is wanting a NDSL for his 5th birthday. Originally he had interest in the Leapfrog handheld game system, but after talking with the guy at bestbuy- th ethin kthe ndsl is going to be the better way to go as far as longivity. The Leapfrong offers limited games and may not be servicable In several years when he is done with it and my daughter is old enough for it. The NDSL offers many games, educational media and such that it would allow him more options and he wouldn't necessarily grow out of it in 4 years and I think that we all know this company will still be around then (Im from the gameboy original generation). My husband is a gamer and my son loves to watch (of course we limit this and what games he watches- I don't think a game like Dead Space is 5 year old worthy, but there is no harm in him watching a racing game). My husbands only concern is tantrums starting when told no your play time is over. I don't think games are harmful- its parents who let games babysit their children that are harmful.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 18, 2011 9:01:45 AM PDT
ziggyboo says:
w\Well, you must ask, what is important? DS, out of the picture, only about a 20 dollar difference for a better screen and longer battery life, plus, you can't get one new. Always get a new console. Now, the DS Lite gets up to 18 hours, the 3DS gets up to 6, this is with minimum light, no volume, and no 3D. a DS Lite lasted me a trip to europe. A 3DS can't even last a long car ride. However, they COULD halt development for those games in the next couple of years. Which is better, well, that is up to you.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 6, 2011 1:36:16 PM PDT
I think the rest of us who are actually looking for information would appreciate those with opinions to find another string to post your opinions on. Thank you.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 6, 2011 1:38:24 PM PDT
Susan,
Do you have one right now? I'm trying to decide if the Lite or DS would be better than the Leapster for my 5 1/2 girl. However, she's still not the gentlest with her toys and I'd like to know how the Lite holds up. Thank you.

Posted on Nov 9, 2011 8:09:37 AM PST
amanda83 says:
I would not buy the 3ds the company actually warned that kids under 6 watching the 3d feature could mess up thier eye development. only reason im not buying my 6 yr old the 3ds. im getting the regular DSI or maybe the dsi xl. I have a soon to be 3 yr old, but i think we are going to get the mobigo system for him. mainly due to the price of the ds. we are middle income family and can only really afford one right now :)

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 12, 2011 9:54:48 PM PST
This is my same question for my 5 1/2 year old daughter! I've been trying to get the answer, but am not. I am curious as to if she will have the dexterity to play the games or if it will be too small and frustrating for her? I was thinking about getting the Leapfrog or Vtech, but after researching it, I've heard this is the better route...I might just have to bite the bullet and go with an inexpensive tablet!!!!

Posted on Nov 12, 2011 9:57:17 PM PST
My question specifically relates the amount of dexterity it would take. I really know nothing about this thing other than what I'm reading. For those of you with small children, who previously considered the vtech or leapster, would the DS or a tablet be a better choice? My daughter is 5 1/2.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 14, 2011 9:03:44 PM PST
Elly Peirson says:
Dawn,
My daughter is the same age and I am considering the same thing. I am not worried about the dexterity, though. I have seen my daughter play the Nintendo DSi with a six year old friend and she does not get frustrated. I just had a hard time sorting through all the games to find ones that were suitable for her age. If anyone has any suggestions, I'd love to hear them. Thanks.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 22, 2011 6:10:15 PM PST
Sally Joniec says:
i got the leappad for my 6 yr old and Love it. really really do. we are outdoor people and the leappad stimulates and educates when needed but does not SUCK HER IN. extremely educational, durable, and with some rechargable batteries inexpensive to run and buy games and apps for. plus, it comes with a camera and video recorder which is so fun. i also love that i can add her anchor words into the program from school so she is working on words that i chose. also love that i can track her progress, strength and weakness' all by plugging it in to my computer. goodluck.

Posted on Dec 5, 2011 6:53:38 AM PST
grandma says:
do you need a stylis dor nintendo ds. my little 5 yr old has problems with the stylis over touch screen

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 5, 2011 8:10:35 AM PST
Tany Harris says:
It depends on the game, but majority of games do need the stylus..

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 8, 2011 2:29:41 PM PST
I have a 6 yr old who received a pre-owned DS Lite as a gift last Christmas (age 5 at the time of the gift). We were not sure if it would be too old for him, so we went with a used one (less money wasted if it turned out to be a "fail"). He loves it. He loved it from the day he got it. Over the year he has grown more into it, being able to figure out games all by himself. But from the get go he had the physical ability to play it, we just had to help him figure out many of the games since he couldn't read yet. Our biggest obstacle has been keeping it away from our 3 yr old, but that is a whole other topic ;)
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Participants:  28
Total posts:  33
Initial post:  Oct 15, 2008
Latest post:  Nov 26, 2014

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