What happened to $9.99 for Kindle Editions?


Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-25 of 82 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Mar 9, 2009 4:31:26 PM PDT
Paige Turner says:
I'll order this book anyway - but as a Kindle 1.0 adopter and recent buyer of K2.0, I'm not happy with this trend of charging the same price as the dead tree book. Amazon, for the first time in history, is ripping us off - they should push back on the publisher's demand for so much- ebook should at least be a couple of bucks cheaper for the amount they save in printing and shipping costs.

Posted on Mar 10, 2009 9:58:08 AM PDT
JennMars says:
The publisher's posted price for the e-book version is $27.99, the same as the price for the hard copy.

I just sent a complaint to Doubleday; they shouldn't expect to receive the same price for a rights-managed electronic copy of the item that they receive for a physical copy. While I don't have the philosophical objection to DRM that many do, I do object to being asked to pay the same price as for a physical copy.

At $15.37, Amazon has knocked almost $13 off the publishers e-book price and it's also a dollar and change cheaper than the Amazon price for the hard copy. Maybe if we complain more to the publishers, they'll get more real about e-book pricing.

Posted on Mar 10, 2009 12:58:50 PM PDT
I would also like to express my dismay for the price hike for the Kindle edition. As a Kindle 1.0 user, one of the big advantages to the Kindle was the cheaper price for a current bestseller. What did happen?

Posted on Mar 10, 2009 1:19:49 PM PDT
Terri Harris says:
The 9.99 price point is for select new books and all NY Times bestsellers. If this becomes a bestseller it'll be 9.99 too. If not, it stays expensive.

I for one will not purchase it at that price- this or almost (almost) any kindle edition.

Posted on Mar 10, 2009 4:25:28 PM PDT
Not only is this a rip-off price, but the book is a bad copy of the original, FILLED with typos (see my review).

Posted on Mar 10, 2009 9:15:09 PM PDT
Marilee says:
Some books are priced higher than $9.99 immediately after release, but I've noticed that they come down in price soon after. So wait a bit. In the meantime, read a sample.

Posted on Mar 12, 2009 5:07:54 AM PDT
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 12, 2009 7:14:30 AM PDT
C. Faull says:
If you buy it then it encourages the powers that be to keep the prices higher. If we all refuse to buy these books until the price lowers, then it will better for everyone. It's simple supply & demand. If you're willing to pay the higher price that's what they'll keep charging us.

Posted on Mar 12, 2009 1:08:03 PM PDT
JennMars says:
If all we do is refuse to buy the books, the publishers will stop providing electronic editions because nobody buys them.

Don't JUST not buy the books. Contact the publisher and tell them WHY you aren't buying the books. That will have a much bigger impact.

Posted on Mar 12, 2009 3:31:51 PM PDT
Wow, that was the only reason I was thinking of buying a kindle. If the price points are the same I would rather have a hardback. This sounds like bait and switch to me.

Posted on Mar 12, 2009 3:50:57 PM PDT
C. J. Clukay says:
Most books are cheaper on the Kindle. Its not a bait and switch, just some publishers who refuse to lower the prices but most do.

Posted on Mar 15, 2009 8:55:58 PM PDT
B. Blanton says:
The increased prices are new and have only happened since Kindle2 came out. I bought 100 books last year and never paid over 9.99 for a book. I pre-ordered, ordered books that were not best-sellers, books that had been out for several years, books that have now jumped to $14-16 that were never originally that price. I do think there must have a convergence of forces here with all the price changes centered around Kindle2, including Amazon, the publishers and the authors. It was not well thought out to do it during the worst economy we have had in a long time. Perhaps they thought if we could afford a Kindle, we could afford a $3-6 dollar price increase in many books. For some of us that's just not possible this winter. For others , Kindle readers over the last year, it is the principle that the price increase happened with no notice AFTER the Kindle2's were bought and paid for. Most of us oldies have been expert advertisers for the Kindle for months because they draw so much attention in public. I had been loudly singing its praises, including the reasonable purchase prices after the initial steep investment. No longer. The 9 99boycott group rose out of the disappointment, anger and sadness that rose out the the price increases as it became clear that this was a new trend, not just a few greedy publishers. Remember that Kindle books have no money being spent for paper, printing, binding, shelf space, storage, distribution, transportation and markdowns on extra books not sold. So when the Kindle price bumps up against the discount price, someone is making out and it isn't the customer.

Posted on Mar 21, 2009 9:09:35 AM PDT
JennMars says:
The price for House of Cards is now (as of 3/20/09) $9.99 for Kindle. Also, the typos appear to have been fixed.

If there's a spike in purchases after the price drops to $9.99, perhaps it will encourage publishers to set lower prices and allow Amazon to offer the $9.99 price without taking a significant financial hit versus what they have to pay to the publisher. So those of you who held out until the price came down (like me) -- make good on what you said and buy the book!

Posted on Apr 2, 2009 3:31:30 PM PDT
D. Burke says:
Almost bought a Kindle today. Found that 3 of the books I was interested in were well above the $9.99 I was led to believe was the top Kindle price (and which I already thought was too high for something I can get in paperback for $4.50 at Costco). Guess what? No Kindle for me, yet.

Posted on Apr 7, 2009 9:42:06 PM PDT
L. Pederson says:
I too was blindsided by the price increase for books! I thought $9.99 was pushing it, given the initial investment for the Kindle. I agree, the only way to bring those prices down is for everyone who is against it to write about their displeasure and refuse to buy the overpriced books. Money talks. If we, as Kindle readers don't speak out, who will?? No one else cares, except, of course, future Kindle readers...

Posted on Apr 19, 2009 11:31:19 PM PDT
I bought a Kindle 1 for myself, another for my wife and just recently a Kindle 2 for my brother. These big prices are a rip off. I wouldn't have bought them if I had known Amazon was going to rip us off with these price hikes. They promised us the $9.99. Balducci's First Family is $15.39 on Kindle is only $15.99 at Mysteryguild.com. If you catch the free shipping offers that's it and you get a hadcover book to sell or pass on. I am going back to them for any book Kindle releases over $9.99.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 5, 2009 5:01:49 PM PDT
I have purchased Kindle Books that were over $10, not a religious thing for me, but I will note this one appears to have crept upwards, to $12 as of July 5th. Also no text to speech. So I guess I'll put off ordering it for now. Plenty of $10 books on the bestseller lists. I have to keep reminding myself to buy books when they're on the lists, not wait for them to get cheaper/more expensive. I see the paperback is coming out, cheaper than the Kindle version. It's an odd market.

Posted on Feb 1, 2010 10:58:55 AM PST
H. Silverman says:
With prices the same as the iPad, publishers are going to be happier, readers fewer, and I, personally, will take more advantage of my Free Library e-book offerings on my notebook. Hopefully I will watch both Apple and Amazon destroy themselves. It seems as though Kindle is on the road to self-destruction.

Posted on Feb 6, 2010 8:11:52 PM PST
J. jacob says:
I will be using the library again much more! This is a ripoff.

Posted on Feb 24, 2010 8:20:20 AM PST
JBK says:
I must be missing something. I buy a kindle version for 9.99 and I'm the only reader of that copy. I buy a hard copy of the same book for a few dollars more and I hand it off to a friend who hands it off to a friend and so on. The publishers better start up the chain saws, I'm going back to hard copies for the same price.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 24, 2010 9:21:44 AM PST
BRB says:
Agreed. I'd rather pay an extra $2 for the hardcover edition and give it away than pay these new ridiculous e-book prices.

Posted on Mar 4, 2010 8:13:10 AM PST
Galvanize says:
I am starting to feel ripped off for buying the Kindle. I bought it expecting lower costs for the books. Now my break even point is higher than it was. I can now go out and buy most books in harback editions for about $1 more and have them on the day of release. I dont have to wait until after the release date to get the kindle edition.

With all the ebook readers coming out, I may not stick with Amazon as there will be no advantage with price. If I am going to carry, I might as well switch to the IPad. It will do so much more than a Kindle.

I will also start buying books at Costco again. Also I will look at Goodwill where I can pick up books for about $2.00. The library is free like it has always been.

By the way - if you join Doubleday book club you get books for members price plus 5 books for 99 Cents.

Posted on Mar 14, 2010 3:08:27 PM PDT
Love to read says:
The whole point of buying a kindle for several hundred dollars is that in the long run you save paper and you save money because the books are cheaper (for the publisher to distribute and for the buyer). I have bought almost one hundred kindle books and I am very dismayed that they have started to raise the price of some books to $15 instead of $10. Don't buy these books!!

Posted on Mar 19, 2010 9:30:28 AM PDT
S. Schacher says:
The only thing left using the Kindle is saving shelf space at home. There's the convenience thing of immediately receiving the book you ordered, but you know what? Buy the hardcover for a few bucks more and then pass it on to friends or bring it to a used bookstore and get some money back. Paying a comparable price for a product that takes no extra work to package, print, and deliver makes no sense for the consumer and until this message is fully received by the publishing industry, don't buy into their increased profit margin for e-books.

Posted on Apr 4, 2010 4:16:32 PM PDT
Justin Meith says:
Nothing to Envy: Ordinary Lives in North Korea

The brand new paperback sells for 4 dollars less than the $14.30 kindle ebook price. That is not market-rational pricing. That is a publisher trying to kill the ebook market.
‹ Previous 1 2 3 4 Next ›
[Add comment]
Add your own message to the discussion
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Prompts for sign-in
 


 

This discussion

Participants:  63
Total posts:  82
Initial post:  Mar 9, 2009
Latest post:  Jul 15, 2013

New! Receive e-mail when new posts are made.
Tracked by 12 customers

Search Customer Discussions
This discussion is about
House of Cards: A Tale of Hubris and Wretched Excess on Wall Street
House of Cards: A Tale of Hubris and Wretched Excess on Wall Street by William D. Cohan (Hardcover - March 10, 2009)
3.4 out of 5 stars   (109)