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What are the religious views in this book?


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Showing 1-9 of 9 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Oct 29, 2008 1:34:36 PM PDT
Billy Swift says:
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In reply to an earlier post on Nov 13, 2008 2:20:52 PM PST
Dmc says:
Eli,
Most of the references to religion in "Nation" relate to a culture that is non-Christian but you can see the similarities of the two religions. It takes place in an alternate version of the earth in the 1700s. The central religious theme is that Mau is facing the "Why does God (his god is Imo) let bad things happen to good people?" question, among many other questions. He questions his religion the way many people question their own faith.
The best part of the "Why does God let bad things happen to good people?" question is I learned the answer over the last year and the message in this book only reinforces my beliefs.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 21, 2008 3:21:56 PM PST
E. Walton says:
My experience with Pratchett's books, including Nation, is that he's generally pro-religion and pro-faith (provided it's not being abused), but doesn't come down in favor of any one. That said, the religion at the forefront of Nation is not Christianity, some of that religion's gods and spirits are quite real in the novel, and the English character decides early on to let these people go about their business rather than try to convert them. If you think those things would make you uncomfortable, I suggest passing on it. However, once you get past the specifics, Nation is about losing faith and hope, and finding them anew, and that's something I think a person of any religion can appreciate.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 22, 2008 12:56:29 AM PST
[Deleted by the author on Nov 22, 2008 12:56:46 AM PST]

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 30, 2008 3:13:54 PM PST
I would rather say, based especially on Small Gods, Feet of Clay and other Discworld books, that Pratchett is strongly in favor of rational spirituality and personal religious beliefs but deeply suspicious of the notion of organized religion. This is not so much an atheist view as a Unitarian kind of one. On the other hand, this isn't a Discworld book, and thus exists in a different cosmology where different rules may apply.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 30, 2008 3:13:55 PM PST
I would rather say, based especially on Small Gods, Feet of Clay and other Discworld books, that Pratchett is strongly in favor of rational spirituality and personal religious beliefs but deeply suspicious of the notion of organized religion. This is not so much an atheist view as a Unitarian kind of one. On the other hand, this isn't a Discworld book, and thus exists in a different cosmology where different rules may apply.

Posted on Apr 24, 2009 4:57:49 PM PDT
ernest says:
Terry Pratchett He describes himself as a humanist and is a Distinguished Supporter of the British Humanist Association. Next question.

Posted on Aug 8, 2009 5:21:12 PM PDT
Yes, thank you, my question is "Why does the caged bird sing?" ;)

Posted on Sep 23, 2009 12:21:56 PM PDT
Athiest? I'm not sure how you are defining that. If you mean "godless", then no, I don't think so. Instead he usually gives us a plethora of gods and religions and shows us both the best and the worst that they represent.

The one thing Pratchett does especially well, perhaps better than any other author I've read, is to turn a subject (any subject, he doesn't discriminate) upside down and make you look at it differently. Sometimes he does this with several subjects at once. His genius is in poking fun at the foibles of man but always with humor and affection, never animosity. If you have a sense of humor about yourself, if you enjoy thinking outside of the box, if you like to stretch your mind, a Pratchett book is perfect. That said, not everybody enjoys having their preconceived ideas served topsy-turvy.
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Discussion in:  Nation forum
Participants:  8
Total posts:  9
Initial post:  Oct 29, 2008
Latest post:  Sep 23, 2009

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Nation by Terry Pratchett (Roughcut - September 30, 2008)
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