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Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Pages are clean; Cover edges show some minor wear from reading and storage. Text is free from writing/highlighting/underlining.
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What's It All About, Charlie Brown? Peanuts Kids Look at America Today Hardcover – June, 1968

4 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Henry Holt; 1st edition (June 1968)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0030684250
  • ISBN-13: 978-0030684258
  • Product Dimensions: 8.1 x 5.4 x 1.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,432,642 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By A Customer on December 16, 1999
Format: Hardcover
Take a 1950's era fundamentalist "hawk" a la Rush Limbaugh seeing liberals and communists in every shadow, ask him to do a semiotic dissection of a comic strip, and the results are mind-bending.
I never realised that Snoopy lying on the doghouse was actually a church, that Linus was a Christ figure, etc. holding the bastion of redneck Baptist morals high. I just thought it was a somewhat charming in a kitchy Bil Keane kind of way comic strip.
Add some anti-hippie and anti-liberal rants about how the kids play baseball and go to church like normal American kids, instead of smoking banana peels and tripping out to "Mellow Yellow", etc. and you have one of the most inadvertently hysterical books I've ever read.
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Format: Hardcover
Another in a long line of Peanuts books, by the cartoonist Charles Schulz. The cover alone is enchanting, featuring a fire in Snoopy's doghouse. His response? "My books! My records! My pool table! My Van Gogh! Sob!"

One intersting aspect of this book is the inclusion of some brief essays serving as scaffolding for cartoons. One segment discusses how the Peants' characters responds to problems. They illustrate with Linus' theory of "runism." Linus observes that "I don't like to face problems head on." He continues two panels later--"This is a distinct philosophy of mine." Final panel: "No problem is so big or so complicated that it can't be run away from!"

A clever volume, with brief essays illustrrated by a specific cartoon from the Peanuts' comic strips. Thoroughly enjoyable.
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By A Customer on February 14, 2000
Format: Hardcover
I bought this book when I was a child w/o realizing it wasn't the typical collection of Charlie Brown reprints, but an good-natured attempt to examine how Peanuts reflected American culture. The writing seems dated now, but the examples of Peanuts that Loria chose to illustrate his observations are some of the best Peanuts panels ever. Of course, the panels are all from the 50s and 60s, i.e., well before Schultz lost his muse.
We've had spaghetti at our house three times this month.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Jeffrey Loria is an INSANE person!
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